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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

ta. 4t*r- 10 







MEMORIAL HALL 
LIBRARY 

Andover, Massachusetts 
475-6960 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




**«iuinnm«* tf 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1914 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1915 






■>\s 



ii 



jV 



CONTENTS 



Almshouse Expenses, 

Personal Property at, 
Relief out of, 
Repairs on, 



55 

57 
59 
58 









Superintendent's Report, 60 

Aiding Mothers, 59 

Animal Inspector, 75 

Appropriations, 1914, 16 

Art Gallery, 129 

Assessors' Report, 61 

Assets, 83 

Auditors' Report, 92 

Board of Health, 53 

Board of Public Works, Appendix 

Sewer Maintenance, 52 

Sewer Sinking Funds, 52 

Water Maintenance, 51 

Water Construction, 52 

Water Sinking Funds, 52 

Bonds, Redemption of, 50 

Collector's Account, 79 

Combination Pump Truck, 41 

Cornell Fund, 78 

County Tax, 44 

Dog Tax, 45 

Dump, care of, 47 

Fire Department, 38, 62 

Fire Alarm Boxes, 41 

Finance Committee, 93 

G. A. R. Post, 99, 45 

Hay Scales, 46 

High School Plans, 30 

Industrial School, 28 

Insurance, 37 

Interest on Notes and Funds, 48 



Liabilities, 


83 


Librarian's Report, 


107 


Memorial Day, 


45 


Memorial Hall, 


46, 103 


Miscellaneous, 


35 



Moth Superintendent's Report 72 

Moth Suppression, 73 

North School Addition, 31 

Notes Given, 47 

Notes Paid, 47 

Overseers of the Poor, 54 
Police, 41, 65 

Printing and Stationery, 44 

Punchard Free School, Report 

of Trustees, 100 

Schedule of Town Property, 67 

Schoolhouses, 29 

Schools, 23 

School Books and Supplies, 32 

Selectmen's Report, 23 

Soldiers' Relief, 58 

Spring Grove Cemetery, 45, 76 

Report, 77 

State Aid, 59 

State Tax, 44 

Street Lighting, 37 
Summary Collector's Cash Acct., 82 

Town House, 43 

Town Meeting, 7 
Town Officers, 4, 34 

Town Warrant, 96 

Treasurer's Account, 83 

Tree Warden, 35 

Report, 71 



& J b O J 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1914 



Selectmen, Assessors and Overseers of the Poor 

HARRY M. EAMES, Chairman Term-expires 1917 

CHARLES BOWMAN ". " 1915 

WALTER S. DONALD, Secretary " " 1916 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
JOHN W. BELL 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 



School Committee 






ALFRED E. STEARNS 


Term expires 


1917 


GEORGE A. CHRISTIE 


it tt 


1917 


LILIAN BREWSTER 


It It 


1917 


BARTLETT H. HAYES 


tt tt 


1915 


HENRY A. BODWELL 


It It 


1915 


JOHN C. ANGUS 


it it 


1915 


THOMAS E. RHODES 


It it 


1916 


FREDERIC G. MOORE 


tt It 


1916 


PHILIP F. RIPLEY 


It It 


1916 



Superintendent of Schools 
J. FRANCIS ALLISON 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 

THOMAS E. RHODES Term expires 1917 

WILLIS B. HODGKINS " " 1915 

ANDREW McTERNEN " " 1915 

LEWIS T. HARDY " " 1916 

BARNETT ROGERS " " 1916 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 

FRANK L. COLE 



Engineers of Fire Department 

LEWIS T. HARDY, Chief WALTER I. MORSE, Clerk 

ALLAN SIMPSON 



Board of Health 

BANCROFT T. HAYNES 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. 



Term expires 1917 
1915 
1916 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Constables 






JOHN H. CLINTON 


Term 


expires 1915 


GEORGE W. MEARS 


<< 


1915 


LLEWELLYN D. POMEROY 


n 


1915 


FRANK M. SMITH 


a 


1915 


WILLIAM L. FRYE 


ti 


1915 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 



CHARLES C. CARPENTER 


Term expires 1921 


GEORGE F. SMITH 


" " 1915 


ALFRED E. STEARNS 


1916 


BURTON S. FLAGG 


1917 


E. KENDALL JENKINS 


1918 


JOHN ALDEN 


1919 


FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 


1920 



Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1916 

SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL HARRY H. NOYES 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY M. EAMES 

FRANK T. CARLTON 

Auditors 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

NESBIT G. GLEASON 

Trustee of Cornell Fund 

JOHN C. ANGUS Term expires 1917 

ALLAN SIMPSON " " 1916 

*FRANK E. GLEASON " " 1915 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER " " 1915 

*Deceased. 

Superintendent of Moth Department 

JOHN H. PLAYDON 

Tree Warden 
JOHN H. BAKER 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Annual Town Meeting, March 2, 1914 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ESSEX, SS.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover. * Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth yoti are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, March 2nd, 1914, at 6 o'clock a.m., 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for 
one year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, 
one member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three 
members of the School Committee for three years, one member 
of the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of 
the Board of Health for three years, one member of the Board 
of Health for one year, three Auditors of Accounts for one year, 
three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial Hall 
Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year, one 
Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, Pound Keeper, Fence 
Viewers, Surveyors of Lumber, and any other officers the town 
may determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, "Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town?" 



Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Widows and Destitute Children, Board 
of Health, Fire Department, Hay Scales, Highway Department, 
Water for Street Sprinkling, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 
Library, Memorial Day, Miscellaneous, Parks and Playstead, 
Police, Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, Redemption of 
Water Bonds, School House Bonds and Andover Loan Bonds, 
Schools, School Houses, School Books and Supplies, Sewer 
Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Snow, Soldiers' Relief, 
Spring Grove Cemetery, State Aid, Sidewalks, Street Lighting, 
Town Officers, Town Hall, Tree Warden, Moth Department, 
Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking Funds, and other 
town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$8900 for the purchase of a Combination Hose and Pump Motor 
Truck, operating and maintaining the same, to replace the hose 
wagon and fire engine now in use and dispose of two pair of 
horses, on petition of the Board of Fire Engineers. 

Article 5. — To see if the town will vote to build an addition 
to the North School and appropriate $2500 therefor, on petition 
of the School Committee. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will instruct the School Com- 
mittee to secure the services of a competent architect to prepare 
floor plans and elevations of a new high school building, and 
to obtain approximate estimates of the cost of same. These 
plans and estimates to be submitted to the town at the annual 
meeting in March, 1915, and appropriate the sum of five hundred 
($500) dollars therefor, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will vote to extend the water 
line to the residence of Charles C. Stickney on Woburn Street, 
on petition of Daniel H. Poor and others. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will appropriate two hundred 
($200) dollars for the improvement and care of "The Boulders" 
to be expended under the care of the Andover Village Improve- 
ment Society. 

8 



Article 9. — To see if the town will instruct the Selectmen to 
ascertain whether the town owns any of the land now fenced 
in, adjoining Elm Square, on petition of the Andover Village 
Improvement Society. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
four hundred ($400) dollars for the purpose of giving a series 
of band concerts in the summer of 1914, on petition of Thomas 
E. Rhodes and others. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
two hundred fifty ($250) dollars for the purpose of installing 
a Universal Box in the Central Fire Station, on petition of Louis 
A. Dane and others. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will appropriate money for a 
fire alarm box at the upper end of Morton Street, on petition 
of Daniel J. Haggerty and others. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will appropriate money for 
two fire alarm boxes, one at the junction of Andover and High 
Streets and another at the corner of Centre and Tewksbury 
Streets, Ballard Vale, on petition of Willis B. Hodgkins and 
others. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will instruct the Board of 
Public Works to extend the sewer system from its present ter- 
minus on Summer Street as far as the residence of H. F. Chase, 
authorize its construction and assess betterments upon the 
estates benefited, on petition of John Franklin and others. 

Article 15. — To see if the town will vote to lay aside the sum 
of thirty thousand ($30,000) dollars for the purpose of laying 
out and macadamizing Lowell Street from Broadway, Frye 
Village, to the Tewksbury line, on petition of Joseph S. Chambers 
and others. 

Article 16. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
three hundred ($300) dollars for the construction of a drain 
to carry off the surface water in front of 88 Central Street, on 
petition of L. F. Hitchcock and others. 

Article 17. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the issue 
of ten thousand ($10,000) dollars of water Loan Bonds, the 
proceeds to be used for the extension and improvements of the 
water system, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 



Article 18. — To see if the town will vote to discontinue that 
part of Prospect Hill Road beginning at a point near the house 
owned by W. H. Higgins to the North And over line, on petition 
of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 19. — To see if the town will vote to discontinue that 
part of Poor Street between North Main and Union Streets, on 
petition of George L. Stott and others. 

Article 20. — To see what action the town will take in improv- 
ing Elm Square according to plans made by the Superintendent 
of Streets, G. W. Wood, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 21. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
one thousand ($1000) dollars for the erection of a sidewalk on 
the south side of Haverhill Street, beginning at the boundary 
line of the late Frank Barton to the boundary line of Geo. C. H. 
Dufton/on petition of Hugo E. Dick and others. 

Article 22. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for an extension of the sidewalk on the northerly side 
of Haverhill Street about 275 feet east of the Filter Bed Road, 
on petition of Thomas T. Clark and others. 

Article 23. — To see what action the town will take in regard 
to the removal of the Brick Pumping Station on Bancroft Road, 
and the installation of a pumping station to take its place in a 
vault made for the purpose near the so-called Holt farm reservoir, 
said pumping station to be run by electricity instead of oil, and 
the appropriation of a sufficient sum of money for this purpose, 
on petition of Fred M. Temple and others. 

Article 24. — To see if the town will petition the Director of 
the Bureau of Statistics for an audit of its accounts in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 598, Acts of 1910, and amend- 
ments thereof. 

Article 25. — To see if the town will grant permission to the 
"Syrian Public Cemetery Corporation" to use for cemetery pur- 
poses the following described land, to wit: Westerly by Corbett 
Street 125 feet; Southerly by land owned by the United Syrian 
Society Cemetery Corporation 250 feet; Easterly by land now 
or formerly of Hanna Skeirik 125 feet; Northerly by land now 

10 



or formerly of Hannah Skeirik 250 feet, the whole being a part 
of the land formerly granted to the United Syrian Society Ceme- 
tery Corporation, on petition of The Syrian Public Cemetery 
Corporation. 

Article 26. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 27. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 28. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 29. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 30. — To act upon the Report of the Town Ofhcers. 

Article 31. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 32. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls may be closed at 2 o'clock p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands at Andover this seventeenth day of 
February in the year one thousand nine hundred and fourteen. 

HARRY M. EAMES, 
WALTER S. DONALD, 
CHARLES BOWMAN, 

Selectmen of Andover. 



Andover, March 2, 1914 
Essex SS. 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the in- 
habitants of said town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and 
in not less than five other public places where bills and notices 
are usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, 

Constable. 
11 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 2, 1914 

At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs, convened in the Town House 
in said Andover on Monday, the second day of March, 1914, 
at six o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the requirements of 
the foregoing warrant, Moderator Harry A. Ramsdell presided, 
and after reading a part of the warrant it was 

Voted, To dispense with the further reading of the warrant. 

Voted, That the polls be closed at 2 o'clock P. M. 

Took up Articles 1 and 2 and proceeded to vote for Town 
Officers and on the Liquor License question by the Australian 
Ballot System. 

The ballot box was found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at 6 o'clock A. M. Whole number of ballots 
cast, 914, forty-one (41) of which were female ballots for School 
Committee only. 

The result of the balloting was as follows: 

Moderator — One year: 

Harry A. Ramsdell 382 

Alfred L. Ripley 462 

Henry Provo 1 

Blanks 69 

Town Clerk — One year: 

George A. Higgins 763 

David Burns 1 

P. J. Scott 1 

Henry Provo 1 

Blanks 148 

Town Treasurer — One year : 

George A. Higgins 743 

Martin Doherty 1 

E. R. Shaw 1 

Henry Provo 1 

Blanks 168 

12 



Selectman — Three years: 

Harry M. Eames 702 

Chester Harnden 1 

Tom Conners 1 

Tom Rhodes 1 

Henry Provo 1 

J. Trainor 1 

. Blanks 207 

Assessor — Three years: 

Harry M. Eames 685 

Henry Provo 1 

John Trainor 1 

Blanks 227 

Collector of Taxes — One year: 

John W. Bell 749 

T. J. Mahoney • 1 

Reuben Eastwood 1 

Henry Provo 1 

Blanks 162 

School Committee — Three years: 

Lilian Brewster 535 

George A. Christie 609 

Edward C. Conroy 453 

Alfred E. Stearns 678 

Blanks 590 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund 
Commission — Three years : 

Thomas E. Rhodes 515 

George F. Smith 303 

John Sweeney 70 

Blanks 26 

Board of Health — Three years: 

Bancroft T. Haynes 655 

Blanks 259 

13 



Board of Health — One year: 

Franklin H. Stacey 663 

Henry Provo 1 

Blanks 250 

Auditors of Accounts — One year : 

Walter H. Coleman 645 

Nesbit G. Gleason 637 

John S. Robertson 691 

Joseph Lynch 1 

Henry Provo 1 

Blanks 767 

Constables — One year: 

John H. Clinton 724 

George W. Mears 634 

Frank M. Smith 707 

George T. Abbotf 1 

William Frye , 1 

Blanks 675 

Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — Seven years: 

Charles C. Carpenter 644 

Blanks 270 

Tree Warden — One year : 

John H. Baker 670 

Blanks 244 

Shall Licenses be granted for the Sale of Intoxicating 
Liquors in this town? 

Yes 268 

No 531 

Blanks 115 

"Shall this town accept the provisions of Section forty- two 

of Chapter five hundred and fourteen of the acts of the year 

nineteen hundred and nine, as affected by Chapter four hundred 

and ninety-four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 

14 



eleven, which provides that eight hours shall constitute a day's 
work for city or town employees?" 

Yes 366 

No 216 

Blanks 332 



<<< 



'Shall Chapter eight hundred and seven of the acts of nineteen 
hundred and thirteen, being an act to provide for compensating 
laborers, workmen and mechanics for injuries sustained in public 
employment and to exempt from legal liability counties and 
municipal corporations which pay such compensation, be ac- 
cepted by the inhabitants of this town?" 

Yes 393 

No 135 

Blanks 386 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted on by 
ballot and the check lists were used. 

PRECINCT CLERK'S REPORT 

The Moderator declared — 

Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Treasurer for one year. 

Harry M. Eames elected Selectman for three years. 

Harry M. Eames elected Assessor for three years. 

John W. Bell elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 

Lilian Brewster elected School Committee for three years. 

George A. Christie elected School Committee for three years. 

Alfred E. Stearns elected School Committee for three years. 

Thomas E. Rhodes elected Board of Public Works for three 
years. 

Bancroft T. Haynes elected Board of Health for three years. 
Franklin H. Stacey elected Board of Health for one year. 

15 



Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor for one year. 

Nesbit G. Gleason elected Auditor for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor for one year. 

John H. Clinton elected Constable for one year. 

George W. Mears elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

Charles C. Carpenter elected Trustee of Memorial Hall 
Library for seven years. 

John H. Baker elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund — John C. Angus for three years. 

Chose Surveyors of Lumber for one year — Frank E. Gleason, 
William H. Carter. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee for one year — Barnett 
Rogers, Walter H. Coleman, Colver J. Stone, Charles B. Baldwin, 
Henry J. Gardner. 

Chose Finance Committee for one year — Bernard M. Allen, 
George L. Averill, Samuel H. Bailey, Albert W. Lowe, Joseph 
L. Burns, John H. Campion. 

Town Pound — Voted, That the Town Barn and Barnyard be 
the Town Pound. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted, To appropriate the following stated sums of money: 

Almshouse Expenses 

Repairs on Almshouse 

Relief out of Almshouse 

Aiding widows and destitute children 

Board of Health 

Fire Department, running expenses, purchase of new 

hose and necessary repairs 
Use of hydrants and water used in Engine House 
Hay Scales 
Highway Department 

Amount carried forward, 

16 



$4000 00 


800 


00 


4,500 


00 


500 


00 


1,000 

r 


00 


7,700 00 


550 


00 


100 


00 


25,000 


00 


$44150 00 



Amount brought forward, $44150 00 

Also amounts received from Street sprinkling 
and Street Railway Excise and Franchise Taxes 



Water for Street Sprinkling 


300 00 


Insurance 


850 00 


Interest 


14,000 00 


Memorial Hall Library 


2,300 00 


Memorial Day 


350 00 


Post 99, G. A. R., Chapter 62, Acts of 1913 


50 00 


Miscellaneous 


2,800 00 


Parks and PI ay stead 


1,700 00 


Police 


4,200 00 


Printing and Stationery 


1,250 00 


Public Dump 


75 00 


Redemption of Water Bonds 


10,000 00 


Redemption of School House Bonds 


4,000 00 


Redemption of Andover Loan Act Bonds 


5,000 00 


Schools 




Maintenance 


39,000 00 


Books and Supplies 


2,400 00 


School Houses 


2,500 00 


Industrial School 


500 00 


Sewer Department 




Maintenance 


1,500 00 


Sinking Funds 


1,000 00 


Snow 


2,500 00 


Soldiers' Relief 


1,000 00 


Spring Grove Cemetery and receipts from Sale of lots 


1,000 00 


State Aid 


1,500 00 


Sidewalks ($250 to be spent under Betterment Act, but 




no applications are received before September 1, 




it shall be at the disposal of the Board of Public 




Works) 


1,500 00 


Street Lighting 


6,000 00 


Town Officers 


6,500 00 


Town Hall 


2,300 00 



Amount carried forward, $160,225 00 

17 



Amount brought forward, 


$160,225 00 


Tree Warden 


250 00 


Gypsy and Brown tail Moth Department 


3,250 00 


Water Department 




Maintenance 


10,000 00 


Construction 


1,500 00 


Sinking Funds 


750 00 


Motor Truck 


8,900 00 


Addition to North School 


2,500 00 


Plans for High School 


500 00 


Fire Alarm Boxes 


600 00 


Total 


$188,475 00 


Estimated County Tax 


13,400 00 


Estimated State Tax 


23,000 00 



$224,875 00 

Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 3.09 P. M., That the town appropriate the sum of 
$8,900 for the purchase of a Combination Hose and Pump Motor 
Truck, operating and maintaining the same, to replace the hose 
wagon and fire engine now in use and to dispose of two pairs of 
horses. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 3.12 P. M., That the School Committee be authorized 
to build an addition to the North School and that the t6wn 
appropriate $2,500 therefor. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 3.18 P. M., That the town instruct the School Com- 
mittee to secure the services of a competent architect to prepare 
floor plans and elevations of a new high school building, and to 
obtain approximate estimates of the cost of same, also to look 
into the matter of remodelling the present building. These 
plans and estimates to be submitted to the town at the annual 
meeting in March, 1915, and that the sum of $500 be appro- 
priated therefor. 

Took up Article 7. 

18 



Voted, at 3.37 P.M., To refer the matter to the Board of Public 
Works. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 3.39 P.M., That the Article be laid on the table and 
that Article 3 be reconsidered and the appropriation for Parks 
and Playstead be increased from $1,500 to $1,700, the additional 
$200 to be spent on "The Boulders" and that the Board of 
Public Works invite the co-operation of the Andover Village 
Improvement Society in its expenditure. 

Voted, at 3.40 P.M., That Article 8 be taken from the table 
and indefinitely postponed. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 3.50 P.M., That the Board of Selectmen be requested 
to ascertain and to determine the limits of the town's land in and 
adjoining Elm Square. 

Took up Article 10. 
Voted, Sit 3.56 P.M., To lay on the table. 

Took up Article 11. 
Voted, Sit 4.03 P.M., To lay on the table. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, Sit 4.04 P.M., To take up Articles 12 and 13 in con- 
junction. 

Voted, at 4.09 P.M., To appropriate the sum of $600 for two 
fire alarm boxes, one at the upper end of Morton Street, and one 
at the junction of Andover and High Streets, Ballard Vale. 

Took up Article 14. 
Voted, at 4.10 P.M., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 15. 
Voted, at 4.11 P.M., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 16. 
Voted, Sit 4.12 P.M., To refer to the Board of Public Works. 

Took up Article 17. 
Voted, Sit 4.26 P.M., That by virtue and in pursuance of 
Chapter 363 of the Acts of 1908, for the purpose mentioned in 

19 



Section 5 of Chapter 439 of the Acts of 1887, the Town Treasurer 
is hereby authorized to issue bonds of the Town in the aggregate 
principal amount of $10,000 to be dated May 1, 1914, and pay- 
able $1,000 thereof on the first day of May of each of the years 
1915 to 1924 inclusive, bearing interest at a rate not exceeding 
4 per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually May 1 and Nov- 
ember 1. 

The said bonds shall be denominated on the face thereof 
"Andover Water Loan Act of 1908", shall be signed by the 
Board of Public Works and countersigned by the Town Treas- 
urer and be in such form and contain such statements not incon- 
sistent with this vote, as the Town Treasurer may determine. 
The vote stood, affirmative 228, negative 3. 

Took up Article 18. 

Voted, at 4.32 P.M., That the town discontinue that part of 
Prospect Hill Road beginning at a point near the house owned 
by W. H. Higgins to the North Andover line. 

Took up Article 19. 
Voted, at 4.40 P.M., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 20. 
Voted, at 4.41 P.M., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 21. 
Voted, at 4.43 P.M., To refer to the Board of Public Works. 

Took up Article 22. 
Voted, at 4.44 P.M., to refer to the Board of Public Works. 

Took up Article 23. 

Voted, at 4.53 P.M., To refer to the Board of Public Works to 
report at the next annual Town Meeting. 

Took up Article 24. 

Voted, at 4.54 P.M., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 25. 

Voted, at 4.55 p.m., To grant permission to the "Syrian Public 
Cemetery Corporation" to use for cemetery purposes the follow- 
ing described land, to wit: Westerly by Corbett Street, 125 feet; 

20 



southerly by land owned by the "United Syrian Society Ceme- 
tery Corporation", 250 feet; easterly by land now or fromerly 
of Hanna Skeirik 125 feet; northerly by land now or formerly of 
Hanna Skeirik 250 feet; the whole being a part of the land 
formerly granted to the "United Syrian Society Cemetery Cor- 
poration". 

Took up Article 26. 

Voted, at 4.56 p.m., That the pay of the firemen be the same 
as last year, viz., $50.00 per year. 

Took up Article 27. 

Voted, at 4.57 p.m., That the taxes be collected by the Col- 
lector, and that he recieve one per cent of all moneys collected. 

Took up Article 28. 

Voted, at 4.58 p.m., That the Town Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1914, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts 
incurred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. 

Took up Article 29. 

Voted, at 4.59 p.m., That all unexpended balances be turned 
into the treasury. 

Took up Article 30. 

Voted, at 5.00 p.m., That the report of the Town Officers be 
accepted and adopted. 

Took up Article 31. 
Voted, at 5.01 p.m., To raise by taxation SI 16,000 and also 
an amount sufficient to pay the State and County Taxes. 

Took up Article 32. 
Voted, at 5.12 p.m., To dissolve. 



21 



The foregoing is a true copy of the Warrant and of the Officer's 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meet- 
ing. 

Attest : 

(Signed) GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Town Clerk 



RECORDS OF PRECINCT CLERK 

Andover, Mass., March 2, 1914. 

Polls open at 6 A.M. Ballot box registered 0000. Whole 
number of male ballots received, 2000. Whole number of female 
ballots received 150. Polls closed at 2 P.M. Ballot box regis- 
tered at close, 961, having failed to work correctly. Number 
of ballots cast, 955, of which 914 were male voters and 41 female. 
The check lists tallied with the votes cast. Number of male 
ballots returned to Town Clerk, 1,086, female ballots returned, 
109. 

DANIEL A. COLLINS, 

Precinct Clerk. 



22 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 
Received from tuition, 
Received from tickets, 



George M. Bemis, Superintendent, 
J. Francis Allison, Superintendent, 
Nathan C. Hamblin, Acting Supt., 
Eugene V. Lovely, teaching, 
Harriet A. Foss, teaching, 
Mary L. Smith, teaching, 
Elizabeth M. Loftus, teaching, 
Ruth K. Whiting, teaching, 
James H. Morss, teaching, 
Margaret C. Kimball, teaching, 
Bernice B. Abbott, teaching, 
Eleanor N. Irving, teaching, 
Bernice G. Stimpson, teaching, 
Eliza Spaulding, teaching, 
Carolyn A. Dean, teaching, 
Annie M. Downes, teaching, 
Joanna P. Simmons, teaching, 
Katherine T. Hannon, teaching, 
Margaret S. Hoyt, teaching, 
E. Mae Chase, teaching, 
Frances Hobbs, teaching, 



Amount carried forward, 







$39000 00 






691 10 






219 95 




S39911 05 


S 435 


00 




1249 


95 




110 


52 




1200 


01 




510 


01 




315 


78 




738 


15 




236 


83 




1116 


73 




398 


43 




544 


72 




619 


75 




593 


92 




594 


74 




594 


74 




849 


98 




584 


85 




582 


88 




584 


85 




559 


89 




559 


89 




$12981 


62 





23 



Appropriation and Receipts, 

Amount brought forward, 

Florence I. Abbott, teaching, 
Adele H. Duval, teaching, 
Florance M. Prevost, teaching, 
Sarah A. Hill, teaching, 
Helen L. Dickinson, teaching, 
Jessie P. Brown, teaching, 
Etta M. Dodge, teaching, 
Helen E. Hartford, teaching, 
Mary Moriarty, teaching, 
Sarah G. Cummings, teaching, 
Lena M. Clark, teaching, 
Mary E. G. Riley, teaching, 
Gertrude Farrington, teaching, 
Grace Hill, teaching, 
Cynthia E. Flint, teaching, 
Cecilia A. Derrah, teaching, 
Ruby S. Copeland, teaching, 
Carrie R. French, teaching, 
Helen W. Battles, teaching, 
Emma L. Ward, teaching, 
Emily F. Carleton, teaching, 
Mildred B. Morris, teaching, 
Mary Bridge, teaching, 
Edith H. Johnson, teaching, 
Ella S. Morrill, teaching, 
Hallie M. Stimpson, teaching, 
Nathan C. Hamblin, teaching, 
Mabel Brown, teaching, 
Helen R. Roberts, teaching, 
Daisy I. Barrett, teaching, 
Mabel I. Brigham. teaching; 
Helen J. Brown, teaching, 
Winfield W. Lunt, teaching, 
Pauline A. Meyer, teaching, 

Amount carried forward. 





$39911 


05 


$12981 


62 




584 


85 




494 


75 




609 


89 




121 


05 




226 


97 




217 


08 




759 


83 




559 


89 




408 


58 




131 


57 




584 


85 




399 


32 




147 


76 




734 


87 




580 32 




584 


85 




584 


85 




584 


85 




684 


84 




559 


89 




656 


36 




197 


36 




197 


36 




509 


84 




559 


89 




204 47 




1239 


46 




166 


00 




298 


66 




157 


92 




302 


61 




409 


88 




600 


00 




157 


92 




S28200 21 





24 



Appropriation and Receipts, 

Amount brought forward, 

RuthB. Mitchell, teaching, 

Elsie B. Cheever, teaching, 

Mrs. Charles F. Copp, teaching, 

Alice S. Coutts, teaching, 

Mary Donovan, teaching, 

Gladys Kennedy, teaching, 

Mrs. Grace Thomas, teaching, 

Minnie Hayes, teaching, 

Helena Dooley, teaching, 

Lena A. Dodson, teaching, 

Mary Calnan, teaching, 

Annie Mcintosh, matron, 

Ethel M. Eaton, clerk, 

Granville K. Cutler, janitor, 

John Crowley, janitor, 

James A. Eaton, janitor, 

William McEwan, janitor, 

James McGhie, janitor, 

Alfred Melanson, janitor, 

George Flint, janitor, 

George Spickler, janitor, 

Herbert L. White, janitor, 

J. H. Campion & Co., supplies, 

B. & M. Railroad, transportation, 

Hardy & Cole, labor and lumber, 

Bay State St. Ry., transportation, 

T. A. Holt Co., supplies, 

New England Telephone Co., 

Scott Paper Co., supplies, 

Smith & Dove Mfg. Co., supplies, 

W. I. Morse, supplies, 

Lawrence Lumber Co., lumber, 

Herbert L. White, labor, 

Arthur R. Lewis, work on school census, 

Amount carried forward, 





$39911 C 


$28200 21 


302 


61 


80 


00 


2 


50 


41 


25 


41 


75 


2 


50 


12 


50 


2 


50 


5 


00 


35 


00 


5 


00 


220 


80 


465 


00 


159 


00 


124 


00 


360 


00 


180 


00 


385 


00 


88 


00 


12 


00 


96 


00 


1199 


64 


29 


24 


667 


94 


170 


79 


810 


00 


62 


45 


82 


43 


82 


61 


11 


10 


109 


22 


22 


40 


1 


00 


15 


00 


S34084 


44 



25 



Appropriation and Receipts, 
Amount brought forward, 

County of Essex, tuition, 

West Disinfection Co., supplies, 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, team hire, 

Andover Press, printing and supplies, 

Chandler & Barber, supplies, 

James A. Eaton, labor, 

Am. Rattan Reed Co., supplies, 

Frank H. Hardy, agent, brushes, 

New England Reed Co., supplies, 

Cross Coal Co., coal, 

Wakefield Chemical Co., supplies, 

Lawrence Gas Co., lighting, 

American Express Co., 

Alvah Wright, transportation, 

C. H. Newton, transportation, 

New England Pub. Co., supplies, 

Alfred Melanson, labor, 

S. K. Ames, supplies, 

Wright's Express, 

Geo. M. Bemis, sundries, 

Remington Typewriter Co., supplies, 

Ira Buxton, supplies, 

John Crowley, labor, 

Valpey Bros., supplies, 

George E. Flint, wood, 

Robert Hutcheson, supplies, 

C. F. Emerson, teaming, 

Franklin H. Stacey, supplies, 

Anderson & Bowman, repairs, 

Macey, Stetson & Morris Co., supplies, 

W. H. Sylvester, tuning pianos, 

Excelsior Stamp Works, 

John W. Goodhue, 

Buchan & McNally, supplies, 

Amount carried forward, 

26 





$39911 05 


$34084 44 


207 


00 


60 


50 


123 


50 


337 


09 


11 


80 


6 


00 


8 


50 


28 


50 


29 


38 


1903 


93 


11 


00 


187 


85 


8 


26 


585 


00 


468 


00 


2 


50 


1 


50 


35 


94 


49 


19 


6 


79 


20 


94 


16 


40 


2 


00 


1 


96 


7 


00 


2 


29 


36 


38 


26 


25 


12 


45 




40 


4 


50 


3 


85 


2 


00 


5 


63 


$38298 


72 



Appropriation and Receipts, 

Amount brought forward, 

Hiller & Co., supplies, 

E. McCabe & Co., supplies, 
Pyrene Co., supplies, 
James Napier, truant officer, 
Neostyle Co., supplies, 

J. E. Whiting, cleaning clocks, 
Andover Coal Co., coal, 
Charlotte A. Baker, wood, 
Albert W. Lowe, supplies, 
H. I. Dallman Co., supplies, 
N. C. Hamblin, sundries, 

F. G. Moore, traveling expenses, 
H. A. Bodwell, traveling expenses, 
Philip L. Ripley, traveling expenses, 
W. D. Walker, M.D., school physician, 
O. P. Chase, supplies, 

James J. Abbott, wood, 
C. A. Hill & Co., supplies, 
Milton Bradley Co., supplies, 
Tyer Rubber Co., supplies, 
A. J. Wilkinson Co., supplies, 
Emerson & Co.» supplies, 
Winthrop S. Boutwell, labor, 
Fred H. Shattuck, teaming, 
E. E. Gray, supplies, 
Katherine Berry, teaching, 
J. Francis Allison, sundries, 
Diamond Stamp Co., supplies, 
W. H. Coleman & Co., 
Board Public Works, water, 
Morrison & O'Connell, labor, 
Mabel Brown, teaching, 

G. F. Gurney Co., supplies, 
J. L. Hammett Co., supplies, 

Amount carried forward, 





$39911 05 


S38298 


72 


3 


79 




50 


31 


60 


93 


24 


15 


66 


7 


90 


495 


38 


10 


00 


1 


40 


11 


75 


2 


47 


13 


14 


14 


54 


16 


76 


190 


00 




98 


44 


00 




60 


6 


40 




31 


8 


40 


1 


75 


4 


00 


4 


00 


19 


78 


5 


00 


29 


92 




70 


14 


00 


278 


75 




95 


6 


00 


6 


25 


9 


50 


$39648 


14 



27 



Appropriation and Receipts, 
Amount brought forward, 

H. R. Guild, supplies, 
C. S. Chase & Co., supplies, 
J. H. Playdon, plants, 
Buchan & McNally, supplies, 
Smith & Manning, supplies, 
Theo Muise, repairs, 
S. T. Shattuck, teaming, 
Treat Hardware Co., supplies, 
Allen F. Abbott, repairs, 
W. S. Holt & Son, supplies, 
Edward E. Babb & Co., supplies, 
William Knipe & Co., supplies, 
Poor & Riley, supplies, 
Gordon C. Cannon, diplomas, 
Joseph Chambers, labor, 
Nathan R. Bailey, wood, 
Parker & Co., supplies, 
Benjamin Jaques, wood, 

Total expenditure, 
Transferred to Schoolhouses, 





$39911 05 


$39648 


14 


15 


00 


35 


00 


12 


75 




35 




88 


2 


00 




75 


27 


00 


4 05 


11 


75 


2 


63 


1 


98 


1 


24 


2 


75 


7 


50 


17 


00 




20 


8 


00 


$39798 97 


112 


08 



$39911 05 $39911 05 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $500 00 

City of Lawrence, $ 62 51 

Balance unexpended, 437 49 



$500 00 $500 00 
28 



SCHOOLHOUSES 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914 
Received from Insurance, 
Received from sales,. 
Transferred from Schools, 
Transferred from Books and Supplies, 



Buchan & McNally, supplies and repairs, 

Allen F. Abbott, repairs, 

New England Grate Co., supplies, 

H. C. Mason, repairs, 

American Seating Co., supplies, 

James S. May, painting, 

William Knipe & Co., supplies, 

W. H. Coleman & Co., repairs, 

Thomas O'Brine & Co., supplies, 

D. Donovan & Son, repairs and painting, 

Buchan & Francis, supplies, 

Ira Buxton, supplies, 

J. W. Richardson, repairs, 

M. T. Walsh, repairs, 

C. A. Hill & Co., repairs, 

John M. Derrah, labor, 

Alfred Melanson, labor, 

Frank E. Dodge, mason work, 

James C. Souter, repairs, 

H. Nettle & Co., supplies, 

Andrew Wilson Co., repairs, 

Edward C. Moody, labor, 

Joseph Bourdelais, grading, 

J. E. Pitman, repairs, 

Amount carried forward, 





S2500 00 




202 66 




1 25 




112 08 




94 87 




S2910 86 


S 142 05 




41 70 




42 00 




6 75 




199 01 




306 00 




149 36 




18 20 




13 50 




46 05 




98 43 




9 70 




358 70 




123 85 




11 92 




3 50 




1 00 




40 45 




57 01 




15 00 




13 38 




2 00 




7 00 




584 88 




$2291 44 





29 



Appropriation and Receipts, 
Amount brought forward, 

Smith & Dove Mfg. Co., supplies, 

W. H. Pearce, painting, 

Merrimac Boiler Works, repairs, 

C. L. Alexander & Son, supplies, 

Samuel Smith Co., repairs, 

B. & M. Railroad, freight, 

Joseph Melanson, labor, 

Lawrence Electrical Supply Co., supplies, 

Chandler & Barber, supplies, 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, team hire, 

James B. Craik, labor, 

Mrs. Joseph Melanson, labor, 

Hardy & Cole, repairs on Bailey School, 

John Riley, labor, 

Herbert L. White, labor, 

Total expenditure, 

Transferred to North Schoolhouse, 

Balance unexpended, 



$2910 86 



$2291 


44 


27 


18 


11 


10 


19 


17 


1 


50 


20 


00 


9 


39 


2 


00 


59 


65 


5 


05 


2 


50 


4 


00 


1 


50 


202 


66 


3 


50 


6 


00 


$2666 64 


243 


40 




82 . 



$2910 86 $2910 86 



HIGH SCHOOL PLANS 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 

Myerscough & Buchan, 

Perley F. Gilbert, 

E. W. Pitman Co., 

N. C. Hamblin, 

J. F. Allison, 

H. A. Bodwell, 

Total expenditure, 
Balance unexpended, 



$500 00 



$ 35 00 
100 00 
75 00 
13 16 
13 16 
13 16 

$249 48 

250 52 



$500 00 $500 00 



30 



NORTH DISTRICT SCHOOLHOUSE ADDITION 



.Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 


$2500 00 


Transferred from Schoolhouses, 


243 40 


Hardy & Cole, 


$2009 00 


Buchan & McNally, 


485 00 


Addison B. LeBoutillier, 


249 40 



$2743 40 $2743 40 



:^j 



SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 




$2400 00 


Receipts, 




13 54 




$2413 54 


Edward E. Babb & Co., 


$ 789 60 


Milton Bradley Co., 


198 


37 


J. L. Hammett Co., 


257 


20 


Ginn & Co., 


234 


41 


Educational Pub. Co., 


5 


30 


Tyer Rubber Co., 


9 


50 


American Book Co., 


218 


16 


C. F. Winchester, 


12 


22 


D. C. Heath & Co., 


138 


06 


Remington Typewriter Co., 


10 


75 


Houghton Mifflin Co., 


43 


56 


Adams, Cushing & Foster, 


80 


32 


Kenney Bros., & Wolkins, 


24 


75 


Allyn & Bacon, 


66 


00 


Little, Brown & Co., 


37 


83 


D. H. Knowlton & Co., 


6 


75 


Boston Pencil Pointer Co., 


10 


00 


Silver Burdett & Co., 


57 


14 


Albert W. Lowe, 


13 


55 


E. V. Lovely, 


1 


50 


American Humane Society, 


2 


21 


A. S. Barnes & Co., 


1 


28 


A. N. Palmer & Co., 


14 


13 


D. C. Mcintosh, 


7 


79 


Benjamin H. Sanborn, 


17 


50 


E. W. A. Rowles, 


9 


55 


David Farquhar, 


18 


90 



Amount carried forward, $2286 33 

32 • 



Appropriation and Receipts, 


$2413 54 


Amount brought forward, 


$2286 33 


D. Appleton & Co., 


12 50 


The Andover Press, 


7 95 


L. E. Knott Co., 


11 89 



Total expenditure, $2318 67 

Transferred to Schoolhouses, 94 87 



$2413 54 $2413 54 



33 



MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENTS 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914 $6500 00 

Geo. A. Higgins, treasurer, $ 600 00 

Geo. A. Higgins, town clerk and clerk of 

selectmen, 900 00 

Walter S. Donald, selectman, assessor and 

overseer of poor, 600 00 

Charles Bowman, selectman, assessor and 

overseer of poor, 600 00 

Harry M. Eames, chairman selectmen, as- 
sessor and overseer of poor, 

Walter H. Coleman, auditor, 

John S. Robertson, auditor, 

Nesbit G. Gleason, auditor, 

Harry A. Ramsdell, moderator, 

Election officers, town meeting, 

Election officers, primaries, Precinct 1, 

Election officers, primaries, Precinct 2, 

Election officers, State election, Precinct 1, 

Election officers, State election, Precinct 2, 

Registrars of voters, 

John W. Bell, collector, 

Dr. J. J. Daly, town physician, 

Daniel J. Murphy, town counsel, 

Total expenditures, 
Balance 

$6500 00 $6500 00 



34 



700 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


10 


00 


75 


00 


55 


00 


40 


00 


75 


00 


40 


00 


98 


00 


1596 


37 


200 


00 


352 


49 


$6091 


86 


408 


14 



TREE WARDEN 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $250 00 

Transferred from Gypsy and Browntail Moth Dept., 89 53 

Michael O'Connor, labor, $ 2 25 

Patrick Tucker, labor, 2 25 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, use of teams 4 00 

Walter I. Morse, supplies, 2 35 

S. T. Shattuck, teaming, 4 03 

J. H. Playdon, arsenate lead, 108 22 

J. H. Baker, labor, 55 97 

Frank Mealey, labor, 70 17 

William Broderick, labor, 70 17 

Ira Buxton, repairs and supplies, 1 70 

Charles Spalding, labor, 7 50 

Fire Department, use of horses, 10 92 



Total expenditures, $339 53 $339 53 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914 $2800 00 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co. 

H. M. Larrabee, return of births, 

W. & L. E. Gurley, testing weights, 

James Saunders, retired veteran, 

Arthur Bliss, rent P. O. Box, 

J. H. McDonald, rent P. O. Box, 

Lilla D. Scott, transfers real estate, 

Andover National Bank, safe deposit box 

John A. Riley, janitor, 

T. F. Morrissey, 

James H. Green, 

T. F. Morrissey, team for sealer, 

Selectmen, carfare and expenses attending 

hearings, etc., 
Geo. W. Foster, looking up titles and]deeds 

Amount carried forward , $485 66 

35 



$ 8 


63 




25 


4 


78 


300 


00 




60 


1 


80 


47 


65 


5 


00 


7 


70 


29 


50 


13 


00 


4 


00 


35 


75 


27 


00 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $2800 00 

Amount brought forward, 

American Express Co., 

Edith Sellars, jury list, 

John H. Clinton, 

The Fairbanks Co., repairing scales, 

Myerscough & Buchan, 

B. & M. R. R., trip tickets, 

Madeleine Hewes, copying records, 

Dr. J. P. Torrey, return of births, 

Dr. E. C. Conroy, return of births, 

Dr. C. W. Scott, return of births, 

Dr. J. J. Daly, return of births, 

Dr. John D. Clark, return of births, 

Dr. C. E. Abbott, return of births, 

Dr. W. D. Walker, return of births, 

Dr. E. D. Lane, return of births, 

E. M. Lundgren, return of deaths, 

M.J. Mahoney, return of deaths, 

Geo. A. Higgins, supplies, 

Banker & Tradesman, 

W. C. Crowley, sealer weights & measures 

Ira B. Hill, field driver, 

W. F. Gledhill, fish warden, 

E. W. Prescott, return of Corporation shares, 

Joseph Chambers, 

Horace S. Neal, et al, brush fires, 

J. H. Baker, et al, brush fires, 

Michael Brennan, et al, brush fires, 

Fred Collins, et al, brush fires, 

Fred Adams, et al, brush fires, 

William Baker, et al, brush fires, 

William Burke, et al, brush fires, 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, teams for brush fires, 

Arthur Bliss et al, brush fires, 

A. P. Wright et al, brush fires, 

Charles Shattuck et al, brush fires, 

Amount carried forward, $1733 64 

36 



$485 66 


1 


09 


1 


00 


10 


00 


7 


04 


23 


00 


51 


75 


48 


00 


8 


25 


1 


00 




75 


6 


75 


4 


25 


2 


25 


4 


25 


3 


50 


22 


25 


15 


50 


2 


50 


5 


00 


169 


07 


25 


00 


10 


00 


is, 88 


34 


18 


00 


147 


00 


475 


19 


5 


00 


5 


00 


8 


50 


4 


50 


12 


00 


22 


00 


16 


75 


18 


00 


5 


50 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $2800 00 

Amount brought forward, $1733 64 

Charles Emerson, brush fires, 1 00 

Charles Buchan et al, brush fires, 3 50 

L. E. Chase, brush fires, 60 

Geo. W. Kane et al, brush fires, 64 50 

A. E. Curtis, et al, brush fires, 4 00 
Joseph Dumont et al, brush fires, 215 50 

Walter I. Morse et al, brush fires, 5 00 

Edward Daley et al, brush fires, 6 50 

Fire Department, supplies, brush fires, 18 38 

S. T. Shattuck, teams, brush fires, 10 50 

P. Donovan et al, brush fires, 37 25 

J. P. West, coffee, brush fires, 20 

C. W. Flanders, brush fires, 1 80 
W. H. Coleman & Co., chemicals, brush fires 14 55 

C. A. Hill et al, brush fires, 7 50 

George Carter et al, brush fires, 15 00 

Total expenditure, 
Transferred to Insurance, 
Balance 



STREET LIGHTING 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 
Lawrence Gas Co., 
Balance, 



$2139 42 

41 91 

618 67 


$2800 00 

$5805 82 
194 18 


$2800 00 
$6000 00 



$6000 00 $6000 00 



INSURANCE 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914 . $850 00 

Oct. 26 Dividends, 97 24 

Oct. 29 Dividends, 96 

Dec. 31 Transferred from Miscellaneous, 41 91 

Smart & Flagg, $990 11 



Total expenditure, $990 11 $990 11 

37 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 
Received from use of horses, 
Received from sale of manure, 
Received from sale of harnesses, 



RUNNING EXPENSES 

Lester Hilton, chauffeur, $ 902 00 

Charles C. Serra, chauffeur, 

Hamblett Machine Co., supplies, 

William H. Knipe, labor and supplies, 

Andover Press, printing, 

Lawrence Gas Co., gas and electricity, 

W. H. Gibson, laundry, 

E. H. Shattuck, labor, 

George Ash, labor, 

Charles F. Emerson, 

C. A. Hill & Co., labor and supplies, 

State Inspector of Boilers, 

T. F. Morrissey, horses, etc., 

American Express Co., express, 

Wright's Express, express, 

Gamewell Fire Alarm & Tel. Co., supplies, 

Niagara Searchlight Co., supplies, 

S. T. Shattuck, teaming, etc., 

Payroll, Engine Co. No. 1, 

Payroll, Engine Co. No. 2, 

Horace Neal, janitor No. 2, 

Allan Simpson, engineer, 

Lewis T. Hardy, chief, 

Benjamin Brown, rubber boots, 

Ira Buxton, labor and supplies, 

Ira Buxton, engineman, 

Myerscough & Buchan, supplies, 

Haynes & Juhlmann, grain, 

Amount brought forward, $4464 17 

38 



1055 


00 


3 


00 


121 


77 


33 


65 


107 


78 


39 


91 


4 


00 


3 


00 


9 


00 


58 


23 


10 


00 


66 


64 


2 


83 




70 


85 


68 


11 


08 


46 


88 


814 


58 


485 


00 


90 


00 


75 


00 


150 


00 


15 


00 


89 


03 


72 42 


8 


24 


103 


75 



$8250 00 


3366 


13 


20 


00 


33 


60 



1669 73 



Appropriation and Receipts, 

Amount brought forward, 

Dayton Tire Co., tires, 

E. McCabe & Co., repairs, 
R. E. Hardy, labor, 

Fred Adams, labor, 

John Haggerty, driver, 

John Haggerty, telephone, 

Fred Collins, labor, 

Walter I. Morse, supplies, 

Walter I. Morse, engineer, 

Hardy & Cole, labor and supplies, 

American LaFrance Engine Co., supplies, 

Somerville Brush Co., supplies, 

Allen F. Abbott labor, 

F. H. Stacey, medicine for horses, 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone, 
Fred A. Gould, hay, 

J. E. Whiting, repairs, 

Dr. C. H. Playdon, veterinary services, 

W. H. Coleman & Co., labor and supplies, 

Andover Coal Co., coal, 

Buchan & McNally, labor and supplies, 

Buchan & Francis, supplies, 

Tyer Rubber Co., blowing whistle, 

Tyer Rubber Co., repairs on fire whistle, 

E. W. Boutwell, hay, 

S. E. Walker, repairs on engine house, No. 

T. A. Holt Co., grain and supplies, 

Smith & Manning, grain and supplies, 

J. H. Campion, grain and supplies, 

John Collins, driver, 

William Collins, driver, 

Daniel P. Webster, driver, 

William Baker, driver, 

Harry Hay ward, driver, 

Amount carried forward, 





$11669 73 


$4464 


17 


298 


83 


2 


10 


5 


00 


10 


00 


780 


00 


29 


68 


1 


50 


242 


17 


75 


00 


896 


60 


42 


56 


9 


21 


1 


50 


7 


40 


44 


67 


45 


25 


6 


00 


18 


00 


195 


87 


278 42 


81 


08 


13 


50 


50 


00 


79 


93 


25 


25 


I .51 


28 


127 


98 


173 


77 


57 


08 


766 


00 m 


565 


00 


195 


00 


56 


00 


312 


00 


$10007 


80 



39 



Appropriation and Receipts, 




$11669 73 


Amount brought forward. 


$10207 80 


0. P. Chase, supplies, 


4 


20 


F. E. Morse, labor, 


3 


00 


Frank Carse, labor, 


34 


19 


John Shevlin, labor, 


3 


00 


Combination Ladder Co., coats, 


87 


00 


Charles A. Jameson, hay, 


32 


48 


George Dufton, hay, 


34 


50 


James J. Abbott, hay, 


35 


25 


Samuel Thomes, hay, 


31 


87 


Walter S. Donald, hay, 


79 


06 


Anderson & Bowman, shoeing, etc., 


125 


45 


A. M. Colby, painting, etc., 


47 


25 


M. T. Walsh, supplies, 




60 


Ralph A. Bailey, hay, 


95 


88 


Morrison & O'Connell, shoeing & repairs, 


103 


60 


P. J. Daly, grain, etc., 


170 


27 


Poor & Riley, grain, etc., 


105 


34 


George D. Ward, hay, 


96 


57 


Benjamin Jaques, wood, 


4 


00 


Parker & Co., medicine, 




50 


Louis W. Bills, labor, 


16 


90 


J. F. Morse, labor, 


4 


00 


Crowley & Co., medicine, 


1 


20 


Albert W. Lowe, medicine, 


3 


00 


J. F. Winchester, veterinary services, 


21 


50 


Newton Holt, labor, 


2 


00 


M. O'Connor, labor, 


4 


00 


Board of Public Works, water, 


550 


00 


Total expenditure, 


$11704 41 


Overdrawn, 




34 68 



1704 41 $11704 41 



40 



COMBINATION HOSE AND MOTOR PUMP TRUCK 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 
Received from sale of apparatus, 
American LaFrance Fire Engine Co., 
W. H. Coleman & Son, supplies, 
J. E. Steadman, chauffeur, 

Total expenditure, 
Overdrawn, 

S9400 05 $9400 05 





S8900 


00 




500 


00 


$9000 00 






22 05 






378 00 






S9400 05 








05 



FIRE ALARM BOXES 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 

Gamewell Fire Alarm & Tel. Co., 2 boxes, 

W. H. Coleman & Co., labor and supplies, 

Fred Adams, labor, 

F. E. Morse, labor, 

S. T. Shattuck, teaming, 

Hardy & Cole, lumber, 

Total expenditure 
Balance, 



$600 00 



POLICE 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 
Received from County, 
Frank M. Smith, chief, 
Frank M. Smith, carfare and food for pris- 
oners, 
James Napier, night watch, 
William L. Frye, night watch, 
Daniel P. Webster, 
Henry W. Piatt, police duty, 

Amount carried forward, 



487 50 




94 65 




5 00 




1 00 




50 




6 35 




S595 00 




5 00 




S600 00 


$600 00 




S4200 00 




41 00 


$1100 00 




30 14 




861 28 




859 28 




645 35 




72 00 




$3568 05 





41 



Appropriation and Receipts, $4241 00 

Amount brought forward, 

Thomas F. Dailey, police duty, 
T. F. Morrissey & Son, teams, 
Myerscough & Buchan, 
M. T. Welch, police duty, 
David M. May, police duty, 
John A. Riley, police duty, 

E. F. Conkey, police duty, 
Edwin L. Brown, police duty, 
Frank Carse, police duty, 
Wright's Express, 
American Express, 
Andover Press, printing, 
Smith & Manning, supplies, 
Leonard Saunders, police duty, 
Leonard Saunders, killing dogs, 

F. H. Stacey, supplies, 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., 
Walter I. Morse, supplies, 
C. A. Hill & Co., supplies, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Dr. J. D. Clark, 
Frank L. Cole, uniforms, 
C. M. Newton, police duty, 
Chester H. Lawrence, police duty, 
C. N. Boutwell, police duty, 
Ira Buxton, 

J. W. Mooar, police duty, 
B. & M. R. R., trip ticket, 
Thomas Peters, police duty, 
Geo. C. Dunnells, police duty, 
W. H. Coleman & Co., 
F. E. Morse, police duty, 

Total expenditure, 
Balance, 



$3568 


05 


72 


42 


21 


75 


104 


00 


9 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


11 


00 


2 


00 


13 


25 


3 


00 




21 


12 


76 


1 


40 


57 


50 


41 


00 


3 


40 


87 


58 


7 


60 


7 


95 


4 


00 


3 


00 


62 


64 


6 


00 


8 


75 


9 


00 




25 


7 


50 


17 


25 , 


3 


00 


34 


10 


1 


00 


1 


00 


$4193 36 


47 


64 



$4241 00 $4241 00 



42 



TOWN HOUSE 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 2300 00 
Lawrence Gas Co., gas and electricity, $ 219 47 
George W. Mears, janitor, 724 25 
Frank H. Hardy, supplies, 19 25 
Anderson & Bowman, repairs, 65 
Somerville Brush Co., supplies, 3 74 
J. W. Richardson, labor, 5 40 
W. H. Gibson, laundry, 1 98 
Ira Buxton, labor and supplies, 9 70 
Frank M. Foster, repairing settees, 10 45 
Andover Ice Co., ice, 6 00 
T. A. Holt Co., supplies, 7 73 
J. E. Whiting, repairing clock, 1 00 
James S. May, janitor, 19 15 
Board Public Works, water, 8 62 
Buchan & Francis, supplies, 36 50 
Buchan & McNally, supplies, 50 
Walter I. Morse, supplies, 22 84 
Myerscough & Buchan, supplies, 1 00 
C. A. Hill & Co., labor and supplies, 31 66 
E. W. Pitman Co., repairs on hall, 205 45 
Andrew Wilson Co., 4 15 
H. I. Dallman Co., disinfectant, 3 25 
William Knipe, labor, 57 64 
American Express Co., repairs, 64 
W. H. Coleman & Co., renovating switch- 
board, 100 00 
Washburn Parizone Co., 8 33 
Sadie M. Hobbs, laundry, 5 70 
Andover Coal Co., coal, 240 00 



Total expenditure, $1755 46 

Balance, 544 54 



$2300 00 $2300 00 



43 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 

Hobbs & Warren, supplies, 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., supplies, 

George B. Graff Co., supplies, 

A. W. Brownell, printing, 

P. B. Murphy, printing, 

Andover Press, printing, 

A. Bliss, envelopes, 

John H. McDonald, envelopes, 

Johnson's Bookstore, supplies, 

R. & L. Gay, supplies, 

Henry M. Meek, printing, 

Auto List Publishing Co., auto lists, 

The Birmingham Pen Co., pens, 

Tyer Rubber Co., rubber bands, 

Wakefield Daily Item, printing, 



Total expenditure, 
Balance 





SI 


250 00 


$ 62 


78 




5 


36 




4 


38 




9 


75 




9 


40 




741 


65 




106 


48 




16 


12 




7 


50 

35 




2 


50 




15 


00 




8 


00 




1 


78 
80 


• 


S 991 


85 




258 


15 





S1250 00 $1250 00 



STATE TAX 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 

Nov. 16 Frederick W. Mansfield, State 

Treas., $20262 74 



$20262 74 



$20262 74 $20262 74 



COUNTY TAX 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 

Nov. 2 David I. Robinson, Co. Treas., 



$13279 22 



$13279 22 



$13279 22 $13279 22 



44 



DOG TAX 

Received from David I. Robinson, County Treas., 
Dec. F. S. Boutwell, Treas. Memorial 

Hall, S696 76 



S696 76 



S696 76 S696 76 



G. A. R. POST 99 



Appropriation for rent, Acts 1913 Chap. 62, 
June 8, Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster, 

Total expenditure, 



S50 00 



S50 00 



S50 00 $50 00 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 

June 1, Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster, S350 00 



S350 00 



Total expenditure, 



S350 00 S350 00 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 
Received from sale of Lots, 



John D. Newall, 

John Fraize, labor, 

Philip Allicon, labor, 

E. F. Conkey, labor, 

The D. W. Pingree Co., lumber, 

C. C. Stickney, labor, 

Dennis Sweeney, labor, 

John Franklin, surveying, 

Walter Stickney, labor, 

David O'Connell, labor, 





S1000 00 




447 00 




$1447 00 


S 30 00 




3 75 




330 38 




3 00 




11 24 




9 00 




2 04 


■ 


172 00 




223 25 




5 00 





Amount carried forward. 



S789 66 



45 



Appropriation and Receipts, 

Amount brought forward, 
Andover Press, printing, 
George Dumont, team and labor, 
Walter I. Morse, supplies, 
Charles Shaw, labor, 
J. H. Playdon, shrubs, 
T. F. Morrissey & Son, team, 
Joseph Dearanais, labor, 
Geo. W. Foster, making and recording 

deeds, 
Anderson & Bowman, supplies, 
O. W. Vennard, superintendent, 

Total expenditure, 
Balance, 



$1447 00 



$789 66 


23 


50 


145 


00 


- 30 


21 


32 


00 


15 


00 


2 


50 


181 


00 


15 


00 


2 


25 


200 


00 


$1436 


12 


10 


88 



$1447 00 $1447 00 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 

Dec. 31, F. S. Boutwell, Treas. Memorial 

Hall, $2300 00 



$2300 00 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 
Hardy & Cole, repairs, 
J. E. Pitman, repairs, 
Ira Buxton, town weigher, 

Total expenditure, 
Overdrawn, 



^ 


$2300 00 

$ 6 39 

2 88 

100 00 


$2300 00 


HAY SCALES 

, 1914, 

er, 


$100 00 




$109 27 


9 27 



$109 27 $109 27 



46 



NOTES GIVEN 

Mar. 23, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 21, 8 mos., $10000 00 

Mar. 23, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 22, 8 mos., 10000 00 

May 5, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 23, 6 mos., 15000 00 

June 18, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 24, 5 mos., 15000 00 

July 23, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 25, 4 mos., 20000 00 
Total amount borrowed, $70000 00 



NOTES PAID 



Nov. 7, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 23, $15000 00 

Nov. 18, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 24, 15000 00 

Nov. 24, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 21, 10000 00 

Nov. 24, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 22, 10000 00 

Nov. 27, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 25, 20000 00 



Total amount notes paid, S70000 00 



PUBLIC DUMP 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $75 00 

Olaf Benson, care dump, 75 00 



Total expenditure, $75 00 $75 00 

47 



INTEREST 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $14000 00 

Feb. 19, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 1 

Water coupon, $ 20 00 

Feb. 27, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 18 

Water coupons, 360 00 

Mar. 25, Bureau of Statistics, Notes No. 

21, 22, 4 00 

Mar. 28, Andover National Bank, Int. 

on Notes 21, 22, 474 67 

Mar. 30, Old Colony Trust Co., 27 

Water coupons, 540 00 

Mar. 30, Old Colony Trust Co., 3 Sewer 

coupons, 60 00 

Mar. 30, Free Christian Society, 2 Sewer 

coupons, 40 00 

April 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

19 Water coupons, 332 50 

April 28, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

35 Andover Loan Act coupons, 700 00 
May 7, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

33 Water coupons, 660 00 

May 8, Bureau Statistics, Note No. 23, 2 00 

May 11, Andover National Bank, Int. 

on Note No. 23, 258 75 

May 20, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

5 Water coupons, 100 00 

June 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

40 Water coupons, 17^, 700 00 

June 3, Geo A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

28 Water coupons, 20, 560 00 

June 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

9 Water coupons, 20, 180 00 

June 22, Bureau Statistics, Note No. 24, 2 00 

June 23, Andover National Bank, Int. 

on Note No. 24, 200 42 



Amount carried forward, $5194 34 

48 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $14000 00 

Amount brought forward, $5194 34 

June 23, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

15 Sewer coupons, 
June 23, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

5 Water coupons, 
June 24, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

7 Water coupons, 
July 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

4 Schoolhouse coupons, 
July 22, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

2 Water, 1 Sewer coupons, 
July 27, Bureau Statistics, Note No. 25, 
July 28, Andover National Bank, Int. 

on Note No. 25, 
Aug. 26, Old Colony Trust Co., 18 

Water coupons, 
Sept. 28, Old Colony Trust Co., 26 

Water coupons, 
Sept. 28, Old Colony Trust Co., 3 

Sewer coupons, 
Oct. 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

18 Water coupons, 17J/£, 
Oct. 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

2 Water coupons, 
Oct. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

35 Andover Loan Act coupons, 
Oct. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

10 Water coupons, 
Nov. 5, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

33 Water coupons, 
Nov. 21, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

7 Water coupons, 
Dec. 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

38 Water coupons, 173^ 
Dec. 5, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

18 Water coupons, 

Amount carried forward, 

49 



300 


00 


100 


00 


140 


00 


80 


00 


60 


00 


2 


00 


256 


67 


360 


00 


520 


00 


60 


00 


315 


00 


40 


00 


700 


00 


200 


00 


660 


00 


140 


00 


665 


00 


360 


00 


$10153 01 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $14000 00 

Amount brought forward, $10153 01 

Dec. 5, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

18 Sewer coupons, 360 00 

Dec. 9, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

2 Sewer coupons, 40 00 
Dec. 9, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

18 Water coupons, 360 00 • 

Dec. 24, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

3 Water coupons, 60 00 
Dec. 31, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Sewer coupon, 20 00 

1915 
Jan. 19, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Water coupon, 20 00 



Total expenditure, $11013 01 

Balance, 2986 99 



$14000 00 $14000 00 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, Water Bonds, $10000*00 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, School House Bonds, 4000^00 
Appropriation, March 2, 1914, Andover Loan Act 

Bonds, 5000 00 



$19000 0G 
Mar. 30, Old Colony Trust Co., Water 

Bond, No. 284, $1000 00 

April 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water Bond, No. 212, 1000 00 

June 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water Bond No. 23.6, 1000 00 

June 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water Bond No. 246, 1000 00 



Amount carried forward, $4000 00 

50 



Appropriations, March 2, 1914, $19000 00 

Amount brought forward, $4000 00 

July 3, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
School House Bonds No. 37, 
38, 39, 40, 4000 00 

Aug. 26, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water Bond No. 313, 1000 00 

Oct. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
Andover Loan Act Bond Bonds 
No. 6, 7, 8, 9. 10, 5000 00 

Nov. 5, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
Water Bonds No. 121, 122, 
123, 124, 125, 5000 00 



Total expenditure, $19000 00 $19000 00 



WATER DEPARTMENT MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $10000 00 

Feb. 9, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, $ 1000 00 

Mar. 9, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, 1500 00 

April 11, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, 1500 00 

Aug. 31, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, 2000 00 

Sept. 28, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, 1000 00 

Oct. 20, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, 2000 00 

Dec. 7, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, 500 00 

Dec. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, 500 00 



Total expenditure, $10000 00 $10000 00 

51 



WATER DEPARTMENT CONSTRUCTION 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $1500 00 

Dec. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, $1500 00 



$1500 00 $1500 00 



WATER DEPARTMENT SINKING FUND 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $750 00 

Dec. 15, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Willis B. Hodgkins, Treas. 

Sinking Funds, $750 00 



Total expenditure, $750 00 $750 00 



SEWER DEPARTMENT MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $1500 00 

Aug. 14, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, $500 00 

Oct. 26, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, 500 00 

Dec. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works, ■ 500 00 



Total expenditure, $1500 00 $1500 00 



SEWER DEPARTMENT SINKING FUND 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $1000 00 

Dec. 15, Willis B. Hodgkins, Treasurer 

Sinking Funds, $1000 00 



Total expenditure, $1000 00 $1000 00 

52 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 

Dr. C. E. Abbott, clerk, 

B. T. Haynes, salary, 

Franklin H. Stacey, salary, 

Dr. C. E. Abbott, fumigating, 

B. T. Haynes, expenses, 

F. H. Stacey, supplies, 

F. H. Stacey, milk inspector, 

Charles H. Newton, inspecting cattle, 

Charles H. Newton, inspecting meat, 

W. H. Merrill, consultation, 

F. E. Bailey & Co., supplies, 

Andover Press, printing, 

Dr. H. M. Larrabee, 

F. H. Thomas Co., 

Dr. W. D. Walker, fumigating, 

Board Public Works, labor, 

Mass. Experiment Station, supplies, 

Joseph P. Nolan, inspector plumbing, 

Total expenditure, 
Balance, 



$1000 00 



S 



75 00 

50 00 

50 00 

90 00 

3 20 

20 64 

75 00 

252 00 

232 00 

7 00 

3 45 
14 00 

10 00 

11 00 

4 00 
9 90 
3 00 

68 00 



S 978 19 
21 81 



S1000 00 $1000 00 



53 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The Overseers of the Poor submit the following report for the 
year ending December 31, 1914. 

During the past year, some much-needed repairs on the Alms- 
house have been made. The attic windows, the sills and sashes 
of many being decayed, have been thoroughly repaired and 
painted, together with sixty-nine pairs of blinds, also the outside 
woodwork painted, the brick walls pointed, the upper hall of 
the women's part painted, and the inmates' dining-room which 
formerly w T as in the basement is now on the first floor, making 
everything more compact and comfortable. The shed has been 
shingled, the barn painted, and externally and internally Ando- 
ver has a home for her poor that is second to none in the State, 
not only in its neatness and order, but also in the care, attention, 
and sympathy bestowed upon each and all of the inmates by 
our Superintendent and Matron, Mr. and Mrs. Swanton, who 
still remain with us. 

During the coming year quite a number of changes will have 
to be made, owing to orders given by State Inspector Carey. 
Fire escapes are to be extended, windows leading to same to 
open outward, as well as all doors of egress, and we recommend 
an appropriation of $800 for Almshouse repairs. 

Owing to the continued dull, stagnant condition of business, 
and the consequent lack of employment together with the 
continued increase in the price of mos; if not all the necessaries 
of life, the calls for relief out continue to increase day by day, 
and we ask that the sum of $4700 be appropriated. 

To meet the requirements of Chapter 763, Acts of 1913, an 
Act for suitably aiding mothers w r ith their dependent children, 
we would ask that the sum of $500 be appropriated. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Overseers of Poor 
54 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 
Receipts from Town Farm, 



N. L. Harvvood, supplies, 

H. Bruckmann, grain, 

Valpey Bros., provisions, 

F. C. Small Co., groceries, 

Robert Hutcheson, fish, 

H. J. Furneaux, provisions, 

George C. Dunnells, fish, 

T. A. Holt Co., groceries, 

Lawrence Gas Co., 

Smith & Manning, groceries, 

J. H. Campion & Co., groceries, 

L. E. Chase, supplies, 

Armour & Co., supplies, 

Treat Hardware Co., supplies, 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies, 

F. H. Stacey, drugs, 

A. M. Colby, supplies, 

Ira Buxton, supplies, 

F. M. Porter, clothing, 

Robertson & Sutherland Co., dry goods, 

Reid & Hughes, dry goods, 

Beach Soap Co., soap, 

O. W. Vennard, opening grave, 

J. P. Wyllie & Co., shoes, 

Walter I. Morse, hardware, 

Anderson & Bowman, blacksmith work, 

Seven Oils Co., ointment, 

Everett M. Lundgren, funeral expenses, 

Frank L. Cole, clothing, 

Albert W. Lowe, drugs, 

Charles A. Stone, sawing wood, 

Amount carried forward, 







$4000 00 






454 20 




S4454 20 


S 76 


34 




152 


52 




299 


40 




36 


58 




36 


39 




51 


38 




31 


93 




335 


06 




146 


20 




242 


S3 




101 


08 




75 


07 


• 


3 


75 




8 


57 




3 


55 




15 


00 




36 


20 




1 


85 
50 




7 


31 




94 


06 




7 


50 




5 


00 




7 


90 




23 


78 




54 


20 




9 


00 




35 


00 




18 


48 




30 


05 




9 


00 




S1955 


48 





55 



Appropriation and Receipts, 
Amount brought forward, 

R. J. Barrett, wood, 

F. W. Spinney, shrubs, 

O. P. Chase, papers and supplies, 

Buchan & Francis, supplies, 

Charles Robinovitz, shoes and repairing, 

Buchan & McNally, supplies, 

Hiller & Co., supplies, 

Board of Public Works, water, 

J. H. Playdon, plants, 

Walker Holden, plants, 

Fred Perry, labor, 

Edward Wilson, labor, 

John Barry, labor, 

George D. Millett, plants, 

J. P. Wakefield, provisions, 

Dr. George S. Fuller, services, 

D. W. Pingree Co., lumber, 

Benjamin Brown, shoes, 

J. E. Whiting, supplies, 

J. R. Poole, supplies, 

Andover Coal Co., coal, 

Dr. C. H. Playdon, services, 

F. C. Small & Co., groceries, 

A. Basso, supplies, 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, straw, 

Alvin Jenkins, pasturing heifer, 

Peoples Ice Co., ice, 

W. F. Chisholm, supplies, 

New England Produce Co., supplies, 

Walter C. Boyce, supplies, 

Frank H. Hardy, baskets, 

Smith & Dove Co., ashes, 

George L. Averill, fertilizer, 

Crowley & Co., drugs, 

Amount carried forward, 



$44 


t54 20 


$1955 48 




15 80 




8 75 




28 64 




71 80 




22 60 




28 29 




25 




110 19 




3 50 




3 00 




29 00 




3 00 




5 00 




3 20 




39 93 




11 00 




7 25 




17 10 




2 35 




9 60 




393 34 




4 00 




29 92 




11 17 




15 65 




5 00 




50 00 




2 40 




10 50 




15 00 




1 50 




30 




40 90 




90 





$2956 21 



56 



Appropriation and Receipts, 

A mount brought forward, 

Jaynes Drug Co., 

Bride, Grimes Co., tube cleaner, 

James E. McGovern, fertilizer, 

Samuel Newman, wheelbarrow, 

Thomas Neil, labor, 

Fire Department, manure, 

Fred A. Swanton, superintendent, 

Isabell Sinclair, labor, 

Bernard McCabe, labor, 

Bertha Jansson, labor, 

Frank L. Holt, labor, 

Marie Sparson, labor, 

Olive Taplin, labor, 

Ida Clark, labor, 

John Leasson, labor, 

Charlotte Hill, labor, 

Total expenditure, 
Balance unexpended, 



$4454 20 



$2956 21 
5 30 
1 00 



5 


25 


9 


00 


4 


00 


20 


00 


800 


00 


96 


67 


2 


25 


313 


00 


6 


75 


6 


00 


27 


50 


10 


00 


180 


50 


10 


20 


$4453 73 




47 



$4454 20 $4454 20 



PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMSHOUSE 



Household furniture, 

Clothing, 

Farm stock, 

Farm tools, 

Farm produce, 

Fuel, 

Provisions, 



$1225 


00 


375 


00 


840 


00 


400 


00 


303 


00 


310 


00 


75 


00 


$3528 00 



57 



ALMSHOUSE REPAIRS 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $800 00 

Walter I. Morse, hardware and paint, 

J. E. Pitman, lumber and labor, 

James C. Souter & Co., repairs, 

Hardy & Cole, lumber and labor, 

Arden Farm, gravel, 

J. Houghton Flint, labor, 

G. E. Davis, labor, 

D. J. McCarthy, labor, 

George D. Ward, handling logs, 

William Bowman, supplies and labor, 

D. W. Pingree Co., sawdust, 

James Craik, labor, 

Board of Public Works, pipe, 

Harry M. Eames, drainpipe, 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies, 

James S. May, labor, 

Frank E. Dodge, cement, 

Lawrence Lumber Co., 

Edward T. Ward, labor, 

S. W. Fellows, paper and mouldings, 

Total expenditure, 
Balance unexpended, 

$800 00 $800 00 



$117 22 




86 21 




4 00 




133 37 




2 50 




36 00 




44 92 




29 96 




14 40 




64 61 




14 01 




13 75 




25 98 




7 00 




16 08 




53 85 




82 27 




1 92 




27 50 




15 60 




$791 15 




8 85 





SOLDIERS' RELIEF 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $1000 00 

Amount expended, $ 656 75 

Amount unexpended, 343 25 



$1000 00 $1000 00 
58 



STATE AID 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $1500 00 

Amount expended, $1322 00 

Amount unexpended, 17*8 00 



$1500 00 $1500 00 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, $500 00 

Amount expended, SI 68 00 

Amount unexpended, 332 00 



$500 00 $500 00 



RELIEF OUT OF ALMSHOUSE 

Appropriation, March 2, 1914, S4500 00 

Paid out of Almshouse, 

Paid other cities and towns, 

Paid State, 

Paid on account other cities and towns, 

Paid on account State, 

Total expenditure, 

Due Town from other cities and 

towns, $289 45 

Due Town from. State, 85 35 $ 374 80 



S3621 


37 


423 


59 


414 


06 


289 


45 


116 


35 


S4864 82 



Net expenditure, $4490 02 

Unexpended, 9 98 



$4500 00 $4500 00 
59 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



Number of inmates, Jan. 1, 1914, 10 

Number admitted during the year. 5 

Number born, 1 

Number discharged, 1 

Number died, 1 

Number sent to Danvers, 1 

Number remaining Jan. 1, 1915, 13 

Number over seventy years of age, 7 

Number between sixty and seventy, 3 

Number between fifty and sixty, 1 

Number between twenty and thirty, 1 

Number of infants, 1 

Number of tramps put up. 4 

Number of tramps fed, 14 



SUPERINTENDENT'S FARM 


REPORT 




Dr. 








Cash received for 








Cows, 






S588 00 


Hay. 






70 00 


Boarding horse for Ira B. Hill, 






4 00 


Pigs and boarding pigs, 






89 25 


Calf, 


. 




3 00 


Milk. 






10 75 


Pears, 






4 00 


Apples. 






5 20 


Total receipts, 


S774 20 


Cr. 








Cash paid for 








Cows, 






S320 00 


Paid Town Treasurer to balance, 






454 20 




S774 20 


FRED A. SWANTON. 


Superintendent 


60 









ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual report. 
Number of male polls assessed, 



2006 



Real estate, 


$5932425 00 




Personal estate 


2660355 00 






oocnT7on nn 




oc 




Poll tax, 


$ 4012 00 




Tax on real estate, 


106783 65 




Tax on personal estate 


47886 39 






$ 


158682 04 


Rate of tax per SI 000, 


18 00 




Number of 






Horses assessed, 




648 


Cows assessed, 




1038 


Sheep assessed, 




20 


Cattle other than cows assessed, 




216 


Swine assessed, 




231 


Dwellings assessed, 




1530 


Acres of land assessed, 




18304 


Fowl assessed, 




11485 



HARRY M. EAMES, 
WALTER S. DONALD, 
CHARLES BOWMAN, 

Assessors of Andover 



61 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER 

To the Board of Selectmen, 

Gentlemen: — In compliance with the regulations of the Fire 
Department, I submit the following report from January 1, 1914, 
to January 1, 1915. 

During this time 54 bell alarms and 17 still alarms were 
answered. Apparatus at Central Station answered 46 bell and 
10 still alarms. Apparatus traveled 197 miles, raised 869 feet 
of ladders, laid 17,695 feet of hose and used 1260 gallons of 
chemicals. 

Value of buildings and contents where fire occurred $438930.00 
Loss on buildings and contents 22240.60 

Insurance on buildings and contents 270350.00 

The working force of the department consists of three engin- 
eers, three permanent men and twenty call men at the Central 
Station, and ten call men at Hose 2, Ballardvale. 

The apparatus in working order consists of one Auto Com- 
bination Chemical Truck, one Combination Pumping and Chem- 
*cal Truck, one fourth class Amoskeag Fire Engine, one two- 
horse Hose Wagon, one Hook and Ladder Truck, one two-horse 
Sled, and one two-horse Supply Wagon. 

There is about 4000 feet of hose in good condition and we need 
1000 feet more. Most of the hose that we have has been in use 
between fifteen and twenty years and should be replaced in the 
next five years. 

Combination Chemical No. 1 which went into service July 8, 
1912, twenty-nine months ago, has cost for repairs the small 
sum of $6.50, and $298.83 for tires to date. We will have to pur- 
chase two new tires this year. 

Combination Pumping Engine No. 2 was accepted and placed 
in Commission October 5, and has since demonstrated that it 

62 



can do good service, as shown at the Bartlet Hall fire, pumping 
for over six hours continuously an average of 900 gallons per 
minute. We feel that we have two of the best auto fire-fighting 
machines made, built for hard service and durability. These 
machines have never had an accident and have never failed to- 
start in responding to alarms, and if you will compare the cost 
of repairs made on other machines for the same length of service 
you will readily see that there is no comparison in the cost of 
maintenance. We think it pays to buy the best, and we have 
every reason to think that the Town of Andover has the best. 

During the past year a Universal Fire Alarm box has been 
installed in the Central Fire Station, and all alarms of fires 
telephoned to the station have been rung in on a duplicate 
wheel the same number as in the district from where the call 
has come, thus saving us from ringing Box 52 as we had to do 
formerly. 

The Fire Alarm System is in good condition and during the 
past year the permanent men have spent their spare time in 
improving the system and going over the lines of wire and 
making the necessary repairs. 

Owing to one of the floor timbers breaking and letting down 
the floor in the apparatus room, it was deemed necessary to 
strengthen the other timbers and floors by placing steel girders 
and iron plates underneath them in the vasement. Some of the 
horse-stalls have been removed and in their place a much-needed 
concrete washstand has been built. 

During the last year one pair of horses have been sold and 
one pair of horses together with harnesses and carts have been 
turned over to the Board of Public Works, leaving five horses 
in the Department. The earnings of the horses and drivers 
for the past year was $3386.13, and this year the earnings prob- 
ably will not be over SI 000 on account of dispensing with the 
two pairs, and one pair held within the fire limits. The earnings 
of the horses and drivers with the appropriation of $2000 was 
less than appropriated in 1913 for maintenance of same. 

I recommend that the 4-inch water mains on Chestnut and 
Florence Streets be replaced by 8-inch mains, as the 4-inch 
mains are not large enough to give good fire protection. 

63 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY 

Two houses and sheds $23000 00 

Two motor trucks 14300 00 

Fourth class fire engine 2800 00 

Three harnesses 200 00 

Two ladder trucks 1200 00 

One hose sled 60 00 

Fire alarm system , 4500 00 

4000 feet hose 2000 00 

Two hose wagons 1000 00 

I recommend the appropriation of $8000 for running ex- 
penses, and such other additions as seem necessary; also, $550 
for water and use of hydrants, $500 for the purchase of new 
hose. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEWIS T. HARDY 

Chief Engineer 



64 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



POLICE REPORT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: I hereby submit my report of the Police De- 
partment for the year ending December 31, 1914. 

ARRESTS 

Males, 133 

Females, 9 



Whole number of arrests, 


142 


OFFENCES FOR WHICH ARRESTS WERE MADE 




Adultery, 

Bastardy, 

Disorderly house, 

Rape, 

Truancy, 

Concealing stolen property, 

Evading board-bill, 


2 
1 
2 

1 
1 
3 

1 


Drunkenness, 


12 


Assault, 


16 


Assault and battery, 
Breaking and entering, 


1 
2 


Larceny, 

Illegal slaughtering, 

Disturbance, 


10 

2 

12 


Disorderly, 
Assault on, wife, 


1 
2 


Vagrancy, 

Breaking Highway Commission Laws, 

Peddling without license, 


4 
17 

5 


Malicious mischief, 


3 


Non-support, 
Defacing building, 


3 

1 



Amount carried forward, 102 

65 



Amount brought forward, 102 

Delinquency, 4 

Taking child from school, 1 

Trespass, 7 

Disturbing the peace, 16 

Common drunkard, 5 

Insane, 7 





142 


DISPOSITION OF CASES 




Discharged, 

/\ rir\£iO Ion 


10 

2 

17 


x^ppcdlcU, 

Continued, 


Committed to State Farm, 


8 


Committed to House of Correction, 


3 


Held for Grand Jury, 


4 


Arrested for out-of-town officers, 


8 


Paid Fines, 


53 


Committed to Danvers Insane Asylum, 


5 


Discharged for want of jurisdiction, 


2 


Discharged for want of evidence, 


2 


On file, 


14 


Probation Officers, 


3 


Lyman School, 


1 


On probation, 


10 



Total, 142 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Fines paid in lower court, $436.55 

Burglaries reported, * 9 

Dead bodies cared for, 4 

Doors found open and secured, 116 

Dogs killed, 47 

Value of property reported stolen, $1800.00 

Value of property recovered, 1000.00 

Complaints investigated, 267 

Value of equipments in Police Department, $300.00 

FRANK M. SMITH, 

Chief of Police 
66 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Town house, fixtures and furniture, 
Engine house, storehouse, and barn, 
25723 ft. land, 

Memorial Hall, 
22318 ft. land, 

Engine house, Ballardvale, 
New shed, 
1-3 acre land, 

Almshouse, 

Barn and other buildings, 

31 1-2 acres land, 

Punchard schoolhouse, 
4 acres land, 

Heating plant and 
John Dove schoolhouse, 
Stowe schoolhouse, 
3 3-4 acres land, 

Bradlee schoolhouse, Ballardvale, 
1 acre land, 

Richardson schoolhouse, 
1-2 acre land. 



Amount carried forward, 



$32000 00 




20000 


00 




16000 


00 


S68000 00 






25000 


00 




10000 


00 


35000 00 


3000 


00 


200 


00 




250 


00 


3450 00 


12000 


00 


1500 


00 




3500 


00 


17000 00 


28000 


00 


8000 00 








36000 00 


42000 


00 


24000 


00 




6000 


00 


72000 00 


14500 


00 


500 


00 


15000 00 


5000 


00 


400 


00 


5400 00 








S251850 00 



67 



Amount brought forward, 


$251850 00 


Indian Ridge schoolhouse, 


$9600 00 


1 acre land, 


800 00 




10400 00 



West Centre schoolhouse, 
1-2 acre land, 

North District schoolhouse, 
1-2 acre land, 

Abbott District schoolhouse, 
1-2 acre land, 

Bailey District schoolhouse, 
1-2 acre land, 

Osgood District schoolhouse, 
1-2 acre land, 

Old schoolhouse, Ballardvale, 
1-4 acre land, 



3500 


00 


150 


00 


3500 00 


50 


00 


500 


00 


25 


00 


1800 


00 


50 


00 


800 


00 


50 


00 


2500 


00 


500 


00 



3650 00 



3550 00 



525 00 



1850 00 



850 00 



9 acres, Indian Ridge (Gravel Pit), 




3000 00 
4000 00 


41 1-2 acres, Carmel Woods Reservation 


3600 00 


173,751 sq. ft. land, Central Park, 






(Richardson Field), 




10000 00 


6 1-2 acres Playstead, 




2000 00 


Band stand, 




1000 00 


Andover Board of Public Works — 






Pipe lines and fountains, 


$245497 00 




Pumping station and buildings, 


42500 00 




Coal shed, 


700 00 




3 acres land, 


800 00 




20 acres Boston Ice Co. land, 


2500 00 




2 reservoirs, 


$16000 00 




4 1-2 acres land, 


2350 00 


310347 00 






Amount carried forward, 


$606622 00 



68 



Amount brought forward, 

Sewer system, 
Work shop, 
New shed, Lewis St., 
47,467 ft. storage yard, 

Punchard School Fund,. 

Memorial Hall, Permanent Fund, 

Memorial Hall Library, John Cornell 
Fund, 

Memorial Hall Library, John Byers 
Fund, 

Memorial Hall Library, Edward Taylor 
Fund, 

Memorial Hall Library, Isaac E. Gid- 
dings Fund, 

Memorial Hall Library, and furniture, 

Memorial Hall Library, Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union, 

Memorial Hall Library, Phillips Fund, 

Personal Property at Town Farm, 

Motor Combination Chemical Truck, 

Motor Combination Pump and Truck, 

One Steam Fire Engine and apparatus, 

Two Hook and Ladder Trucks, 

Two Hose Wagons, 

Hose Sled, 

Five Horses, 

Stone Breaker and Engine, 

Carts, Harnesses, and Tools, 

Hay Scales, 

Safes in Town House, 

41 1-2 acres land, Spring Grove Cem'y 

Receiving Tomb and Tool House, 



$606622 00 



126000 00 

1000 00 

1200 00 

3000 00 



45000 00 



7700 00 



131200 00 

76454 28 



Amount carried forward, 



10000 00 




500 00 




3000 00 




10000 00 




100 00 




3200 00 






79500 00 
3528 00 






5800 00 




9000 00 




2800 00 




1200 00 




1000 00 




60 00 




1000 00 




2000 00 




200 00 




350 00 




800 00 


6500" 00 


• 


1500^00 






8000 00 






$929514 28 



69 



Amount brought forward, S929514 28 

Weights and Measures, 350 00 

Steam Road Roller, 1200 00 

One Sled, 75 00 

Fire Alarm apparatus, 4500 00 

4000 ft. Hose, 2000 00 



S937639 28 



70 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 



During the past year fifteen shade trees were planted in 
various sections of the town, and during the summer eight trees 
were removed from the streets: one on Maple Avenue, one on 
High Street, one on Pearson Street, one on North Main Street, 
two on Abbot Street, and two on Salem Street. Also removed 
the dead branches from the following streets: Salem Street, 
Abbot Street, Main Street, Morton Street, and Maple Avenue. 
I also removed the branches from trees which interfered with 
the electric lights throughout the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. BAKER 

Tree Warden 



71 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



During the past season there has been a noticeable decrease 
in the Browntail Moths which we hope will be permanent, and 
I am pleased to note that fruit trees which were affected with 
San Jose Scale and have been sprayed with lime sulphate solu- 
tion for the past two years, have been greatly improved, and it 
is to be hoped that this work will be continued in order that 
this can be stamped out. The best time to do this work is from 
March 1st to April 15th, before the foliage starts to grow. Dur- 
ing the past season all the shade trees have been sprayed and the 
roadsides have been sprayed in all the outlying districts, and 
this has greatly reduced the cost of the winter work this year. 
About twenty miles of roadside cutting has been done during 
the past season, which will add greatly to the convenience of 
travel and improve the condition of the highway, and I would 
recommend that the sum of thirty-five hundred ($3500) dollars 
be appropriated for the ensuing year for the suppression of 
moths and the care and maintenance of the trees. 

Respectfully submitted 

J. H. PLAYDON 

Local Moth Superintendent 



72 



SUPPRESSION OF BROWNTAIL AND GYPSY MOTHS 



Appropriation, March 2, 1914, 




$3250 00 


Private work 




2378 78 




S5628 78 


J. M. Derrah, labor 


S 148 


96 


Fred Brundrett, labor, 


322 


44 


Harry Hayward, labor, 


205 


49 


M. O'Connor, labor, 


218 


15 


John Shevlin, labor, 


80 


58 


Earl Powers, labor, 


212 


03 


Ernest Zecchini, labor, 


114 


20 


J. Howard Baker, labor, 


295 


05 


William Ross, labor, 


98 


62 


Patrick Tucker, labor, 


197 


52 


William Hatch, labor, 


90 47 


John Stewart, labor, 


151 


19 


Philip Allicon, labor, 


24 


00 


Walter Stickney, labor, 


27 


00 


Frank Mealy, labor, 


269 


03 


William Broderick, labor, 


287 


49 


Jonathan Hilton, labor, 


88 


45 


Clarence Harrington, labor, 


36 


67 


James Craik, labor, 


213 


21 


J. McDermott, labor, 


25 


65 


Henry Buckley, labor, 


35 


01 


Joseph Peters, labor, 


66 


75 


John Donovan, labor, 


74 


63 


Paul Haber, labor, 


37 


50 


Frank Connolley, labor, 


108 


00 


J. H. Play don, use of horse and labor, 


252 


80 


Ira Buxton, repairs and supplies, 


35 


79 


S. T. Shattuck, storing sprayer and use of 






team, 


180 


26 


Anderson & Bowman, repairs, 


2 


30 


American Express, express, 


2 


72 



Amount carried forward, 



S3901 96 



73 



Appropriation and Receipts, 

Amount brought forward, 

Grasseli Chemical Co., arsenate of lead, 

William F. Chisholm. 

A. M. Colby, supplies, 

Buchan & McXally, supplies, 

Freeman Abbott, use of horses, 

Hill Hardware & Paint Co., 

Boston Coupling Co., repairs, 

Walter I. Morse, supplies, 

Lawrence Rubber Co., 

W. D. Walker. 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies, 

Myerscough & Buchan, supplies, 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, 

F. W. Rane, State Forester, too , 

Total expenditure, 
Transferred to Tree Warden, 
Balance, 





S5628 78 


S3901 


96 


317 


57 


5 


45 


7 


50 


2 


80 


300 


00 


124 


60 




50 


29 


33 


4 


00 


4 


00 


41 


06 


3 


03 


102 


50 


205 


03 


S5056 


33 


89 


53 


482 


92 



S5628 78 S5628 78 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: I hereby submit my report for the year be- 
ginning November 15, 1913, and ending November 15, 1914. 

Number of cattle inspected, 1403 

Number of swine inspected, 530 

Number of cow stables inspected, 159 

Number of tubercular cattle quarantined and condemned, 43 
Interstate cattle held for test, and identified and released 

from quarantine, 44 

Number of cases of rabies, 2 

Dogs quarantined on account of rabies, 6 

Dogs killed on account of rabies, 3 

Stables cleansed and disinfected, 34 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. NEWTON 

Inspector of Animals 



75 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Your committee are of the unanimous opinion that a larger 
appropriation of money will be necessary in the near future to 
prepare the easterly half of the grounds for burial purposes, as 
the lots of land in the westerly side are mostly taken and it will 
be but a short time before they are all taken. Your committee 
have in contemplation a plan for the further development of 
the grounds and will submit the same to the town for action 
at a future meeting. For the coming year they ask for the usual 
appropriation of $1000 and proceeds from sale of lots. The 
present condition of the grounds is estimable and reflects much 
credit on the Superintendent. We should always remember 
that a burial-place is sacred ground and should not be neglected. 

"I like that ancient Saxon phrase which calls 
The burial ground God's acre; it is just, 
It consecrates each grave within its walls 
And breathes a benison o'er the sleeping dust." 

JOHN L. SMITH 
GEORGE W. FOSTER 
FELIX G. HAYNES 
OLIVER W. VENNARD 
GEORGE D. MILLETT 
JOHN W. BELL 
DANIEL H. POOR 

Cemetery Trustees 

Andover, Feb. 9, 1915 



76 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 



Lots sold as per last report, 423 

Lots sold this year, 13 



Total number of lots sold, 436 

Total number of single graves sold, 151 

Interments as per last report, 1110 

Interments this year, 58 



Total number of interments, 1168 

Respectfully submitted, 

O. W. VENNARD, Supt. 



77 



CORNELL FUND 



RECEIVED 

Amount of Fund, $5000 00 

Deposited in Savings Banks, 5000 00 

Balance from last year, $ 99 15 

Dividends, 228 72 

$ 327 87 



PAID 



Expended for coal and wood, $302 50 

Balance on hand, 25 37 



327 87 



JOHN C. ANGUS, 
ALLAN SIMPSON, 
W. D. WALKER, 

Trustees 



78 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of Assessors: — 

I herewith hand you my report as Collector of Taxes for the 
year ending' December 31, 1914. 



1908 



Amount as per Warrant, 
Interest, 
Collected Taxes, 
Collected Interest, 



$68 30 
8 20 


S68 30 
8 20 


$76 50 


$76 50 



1910 



Amount as per Warrant, 






$1228 47 


Error in Warrant, 






25 01 


Additional Assessments, 






3 19 


Street Sprinkling, 






5 04 


Moth Work, 






3 66 


Interest, 






122 68 


Collected Taxes, 


S 551 


25 




Collected Street Sprinkling, 


5 


04 




Collected Moth Work, 


3 


66 




Collected Interest, 


122 


68 


- 


Abated, 


396 


48 




Uncollected, 


308 


67 




■ 


S1388 


05 


S1388 05 



79 



1911 



Amount as per Warrant, 






S3855 32 


Additional Assessments, 






5 02 


Street Sprinkling, 






13 23 


Moth Work. 






179 02 


Interest, 






455 20 


Collected Taxes, 


S2730 


88 




Collected Street Sprinkling, 


13 


23 




Collected Moth Work, 


179 02 




Collected Interest, 


455 


20 




Abated, 


466 


99 




Uncollected, 


662 


47 






S4507 


79 


S4507 79 


1912 








Amount as per Warrant. 






S9119 06 


Additional Assessments, 






3 35 


Street Sprinkling. 






33 69 


Moth Work. 






123 57 


Interest, 






533 93 


Collected Taxes, 


5247 


08 




Collected Street Sprinkling, 


33 


69 




Collected Moth Work, 


123 


57 




Collected Interest, 


533 


93 




Abated, 


557 


96 




Uncollected, 


3317 


37 






S9813 


60 


S9813 60 


1913 








Amount as per Warrant, 






S17653 96 


Additional Assessments, 






23 30 


Street Sprinkling, 






65 28 


Moth Work, 






209 39 


Interest, 






339 45 


Amount carr led fo rwa rd , 


S18291 38 



80 



Amount brought forward, 




$18291 38 


Collected Taxes, 


$9301 00 




Collected Street Sprinkling, 


65 28 




Collected Moth Work, 


209 39 




Collected Interest, 


339 45 




Abated, 


258 64 




Uncollected, 


8117 62 






$18291 38 


18291 38 


1914 






Amount as per Warrant, 




$158682 04 


Additional Assessments, 




5366 18 


Bay State St. R. R. Excise Tax, 




2049 41 


Street Sprinkling, 




1348 79 


Moth Work, 




1863 14 


Interest, 




54 32 


Collected Taxes, 


$136848 74 




Collected Bay State St. R. R. Excise 






Tax, 


2049 41 




Collected Street Sprinkling, 


1348 79 




Collected Moth Work, 


1863 14 




Collected Interest, 


54 32 




Abated, 


129 55 




Uncollected, 


27069 93 






$169363 88 $169363 88 



81 



SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 











B.S. St. R. R. 


Interest 






Taxes 


Street 


Moth 


Excise 


on 


Totals 






Sprinkling 


Work 


Tax 


Taxes 




1908 


$ 68 30 






$ 8 20 


S 76 50 


1910 


551 52 


5 04 


3 66 




122 68 


682 90 


1911 


2730 88 


13 23 


179 02 




455 20 


3378 33 


1912 


5247 08 


33 69 


123 57 




533 93 


5938 27 


1913 


9301 00 


65 28 


209 39 




339 45 


9915 12 


1914 


136848 74 


1466 03 


2378 78 


2049 41 


54 32 


142164 40 




S154747 52 


$1466 03 


S2378 78 


S2049 41 


$1513 78 


S162155 52 



JOHN W. BELL, 

Collector of Taxes 



8> 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Liabilities 



Water Bonds, 4% (8000 due 1915) $128000 00 

Water Bonds, 3Y 2 % (3000 due 1915), 56000 00 

Sewer Bonds, 4%, 33000 00 

And'rLoan Bonds 4% (5000 due 1915), 30000 00 



$247000 00 



Assets 



Cash, General Fund, 


$ 8927 48 




Cash, Water Department, 


1814 67 


$10742 15 


Uncollected Taxes, 


$39476 06 




Street Sprinkling, 


272 53 




Moth Work, 


871 08 


$40619 67 






Commonwealth, State Aid, 


$1322 00 




Commonwealth, Pauper Account, 


85 35 




Commonwealth, Burial Soldiers, 


50 00 




Cities and Towns, Pauper Account, 


289 45 




Sewer Assessments, 


802 33 




Unpaid Water Rates of January 1, 


5675 45 




Sinking Funds, 


43157 10 


$51381 68 






Balance against Town, 


} 


144256 50 




£247000 00 



83 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 



Balance, January 12, 1914, 

Commonwealth, Corporation Tax, 

Commonwealth, Bank Tax, 

Commonwealth, State Aid, 

Commonwealth, St. R. R. Tax, 

Commonwealth, School Tuition, 

Commonwealth, Industrial School, 

Commonwealth, Pauper Account, 

Commonwealth, Highway Commission, Moth Work, 

Commonwealth, Aid to Mothers with Dependent 

Children, 
County of Essex, Dog Tax, 
Andover Nat'l Bank, Notes, 
John W. Bell, Collector, Taxes, 
John W. Bell, Collector, Interest on Taxes, 
John W. Bell, Collector, St. Ry. Excise Tax, 
John W. Bell, Collector, Street Sprinkling, 
John W. Bell, Moth Work, 
John W. Bell, Collector, Interest on Deposits, 
John W. Bell, Collector, One Tax Certificate, 
Water Rates, 

C. J. Stone, Trial Justice, Fines, 
Almshouse, F. A. Swanton, Supt., 
Spring Grove Cemetery, Lots sold, 
Town Hall, Rents, 

School Department, Tuition and Supplies, 
Cities and Towns, Pauper account, 
Hay Scales, 

G. A. Higgins, Town Clerk, Fees, 
Andover Nat'l Bank, Interest on Deposits, 
Smart & Flagg, Agts., Insurance Dividends, 
Smart & Flagg, Agts., Insurance on Bailey School, 
Ballard Vale Stores, Rent, 

Amount carried forward, 



S 16026 


00 


24183 


45 


6143 


34 


1316 


00 


2560 


37 


241 


00 


400 


00 


112 


79 


87 


33 


54 


83 


696 


76 


70000 


00 


154747 


52 


1513 


78 


2049 


41 


1466 


03 


2378 


78 


68 


31 


1 


00 


19614 


00 


153 


00 


454 


20 


447 


00 


278 


50 


684 


84 


200 


92 


110 


00 


129 


00 


226 


04 


98 


20 


202 


66 


230 


00 


S306875 06 



84 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 

Orders Paid, 
Schools, 
School Houses, 
Books and Supplies, 
North School, 

Lawrence Industrial School, 
High School Plans, 
Highways and Bridges, 
Sidewalks, 
Snow, 
Parks, 

Street Lighting, 
Police, 

Printing and Stationery, 
Insurance, 
Miscellaneous, 
Town House, 
Town Officers, 
Fire Department, 
Fire Alarm Boxes, 
Spring Grove Cemetery, 
Board of Health, 
Moth Work, 
Tree Warden, 
Public Dump, 
Hay Scales, 

Interest on Notes and Bonds, 
Redemption 10 Water Bonds, 
Redemption 4 School House Bonds, 
Redemption 5 Andover Loan Act Bonds, 
Maintenance Water Department, 
Construction, Water Department, 
Maintenance, Sewer Department, 
Sewer Sinking Funds, 



Amount carried forward, 



$ 39798 97 


2666 


64 


2318 


67 


2743 


40 


62 


51 


249 


48 


31786 


64 


1648 


41 


2684 


37 


1677 


17 


5805 


82 


4193 


36 


991 


85 


990 


11 


2139 


42 


1755 


46 


6091 


86 


20604 


46 


595 


00 


1436 


12 


978 


19 


5056 


33 


339 


53 


75 


00 


109 


27 


11013 


01 


10000 


00 


4000 


00 


5000 


00 


10000 


00 


1500 


00 


1500 


00 


1000 


00 


$180811 05 



85 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 

Dr. 



Amount brought forward, 

F. H. Stacey, Milk Licenses, 

W. C. Crowley, Sealer's Fees, 

Board of Public Works, Highway Department, 

Labor and Supplies, 
Sidewalk Assessment, 
J. H. Playdon, Moth Dept., Supplies, 
Liquor Licenses, 

County of Essex, refund Killing Dogs, 
Board of Public Works, use of Horses, 
A. V. I. S., use of Horses, 
Tree Warden, use of Horses, 
Forest Warden, use of Horses, 
Fire Department, sale of Manure, 
Abbot Academy, Labor by Fire Dept., 
Boston & Maine R. R., Refund, 
C. R. Forsythe, Horse, 
C. H. Playdon, Horse, 
Fire Department, sale of Junk, 
Fire Department, sale of Harnesses, 
Fireworks Licenses, 
F. A. Swan ton, Supt., Board at Almshouse, 



$306875 06 


10 


50 


44 


07 


897 


98 


10 


00 


5 


55 


3 


00 


41 


00 


3319 


67 


17 


19 


10 


92 


18 


35 


20 


00 


12 


00 


1 


00 


200 


00 


100 


00 


1 


60 


32 


00 


1 


00 


15 


75 


$311636 64 



86 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward, 


$180811 05 


Water Sinking Funds, 


750 00 


Memorial Day, 


350 00 


Special G. A. R. Appropriation, 


50 00 


Memorial Hall Library, 


2300 00 


Memorial Hall Library, Dog Tax, 


696 76 


Almshouse Expenses, 


4453 73 


Almshouse Repairs, 


791 15 


Relief Out, 


4864 82 


Soldiers' Relief, 


656 75 


State Aid, 


1322 00 


Mothers with Dependent Children, 


168 00 


Commonwealth, State Tax, 


19862 50 


Commonwealth, Bank Tax, 


1952 94 


Commonwealth, State Highway, 


400 24 


County Tax, 


13279 22 


Andover Nat'l Bank, Notes, 


70000 00 


Total Expenditure, 


S302709 16 


Cash to Balance, 


8927 48 




S311636 64 



87 



Water Department 

Dr. 

Balance, Jan. 12, 1914, $ 481 17 

Maintenance, 10000 00 

Construction, 1500 00 

Service Pipe, 2436 94 

Bonds 331-340, 10000 00 

Premium and Interest on Bonds, 182 60 

Andover Nat'l Bank, Int. on Deposits, 37 87 



$24638 58 



Cr. 



Orders Paid, 

Balance on hand, Jan. 1, 1915, 



S22823 91 
1814 67 



Sewer Department 




Dr. 




Balance Jan. 12, 1914, 


S 638 69 


Maintenance, 


1500 00 


House Connections, 


573 42 


Miscellaneous, 


15 21 


Sewer Assessments, 


614 34 


Sewer Assessments Interest, 


28 91 



$24638 58 



$3370 57 



Cr. 

Orders Paid, 

W. B. Hodgkins, Treas. Sinking Fund, 

House Connections, 



S2711 


89 


633 


54 


25 


14 



$3370 57 



88 



Richardson Fund — Frye Village School 

Dr. 



Balance, January, 1914, 
Andover Savings Bank, Interest, 



S1130 38 
45 64 



S1176 02 



Cr. 



W. I. Morse, 


S 1 64 


David Farquhar, 


9 00 


Deposit, Andover Savings Bank Jan. 1, 




1915, 


1165 38 




$1176 02 



Draper Fund 
Dr. 



Balance, January, 1914, 
Andover Savings Bank, Interest, 



S1078 98 
43 56 



S1122 54 



Cr. 



Smith & Manning, 


s 


1 10 




H. L. White, 




3 00 




Herbert Lewis, 




4 00 




Edna R. Thayer, 




3 10 




W. I. Morse, 




7 91 




E. F. Conkey, 




9 50 




Helen W. Battles, 




75 


- 


Chas. Sayles, 




2 25 




Geo. E. Flint, 




4 00 




Emily F. Carleton, 




1 00 




Deposit, Andover Savings Bank, Jan 1, 








1915, 


102 


15 93 


S1122 54 



89 



Edward Taylor Fund 
Dr. 

Balance, January, 1914, $211 93 

Andover Savings Bank, Interest, 8 54 



$220 47 



. Cr. 

Deposit Andover Savings Bank, Jan. 1, 

1915, $220 47 



S220 47 



Varnum Lincoln Spelling Fund 

DR. 

Balance, January, 1914, $520 80 

Andover Savings Bank, Interest, 20 20 



S541 00 



Cr. 

G. M. Bemis, Supt. of Schools, S 20 00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank, Jan. 1, 

1915, 521 00 



$541 00 



Isaac E. Giddings Burial Ground Fund 

Dr. 

Balance, January, 1914, S1000 00 

Andover Savings Bank, Interest, 40 40 

$1040 40 

Cr. 

Philip R. French, Treas. South Cem'y, $ 40 40 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank, Jan. 1, 

1915, S1000 00 

S1040 40 

90 



Cemetery Funds 

Dr. 

Balance, Jan., 1914, And. Sav. Bank, S13547 54 

Interest, Andover Savings Bank, 551 06 

Deposits for Perpetual Care, 1275 00 

Andover Nat'l Bank Stock, 200 00 

Andover Nat'l Bank Dividends, 12 00 

Cash, 44 00 



$15629 60 



Cr. 

Paid for Care of Lots, S 529 50 

Deposits Andover Savings Bank, 14852 10 

Andover Nat'l Bank Stock, 200 00 

Cash, 48 00 



$15629 60 



91 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several Town Officers 
and find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all 
payments. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in the Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand, $8,927.48. 

Also, to the credit of the Water Department, $1814.67. 

NESBIT G. GLEASON 
WALTER H. COLEMAN 
JOHN S. ROBERTSON 

Auditors 



92 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 

COMMITTEE 



The following is a list of appropriations recommended by the 
Finance Committee for 1915. 



Almshouse Expenses, 


S 4200 00 


Repairs on Almshouse, 


800 00 


Relief out of Almshouse, 


4700 00 


Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 


500 00 


Board of Health, 


1000 00 


Brush Fires, 


800 00 


Fire Department, 


8000 00 


New Hose 


500 00 


Hay Scales, 


125 00 


Highway Department, 


25000 00 


Also Street Railway Tax and Street 




Sprinkling (amounting last year to $6075 81) 




Insurance, 


950 00 


Insurance under Workmen's Compensation Act, 


500 00 


Interest, 


15000 00 


Memorial Hall Library, 


1800 00 


Memorial Day, 


350 00 


Post 99, G. A. R. 


50 00 


Miscellaneous, 


1700 00 


Parks and Play steads, 


1500 00 


Police, 


4500 00 


Printing and Stationery, 


1250 00 


Public Dump, 


75 00 


Retirement of Veterans Acts 1912, 


300 00 


Redemption of Water Bonds, 


11000 00 


Redemption Andover Loan Act Bonds, 


5000 00 



93 



Schools 




Unexpended Balance for Plans, 


250 00 


Maintenance, 


40500 00 


Books and Supplies, 


2400 00 


School Houses, 


3600 00 


Industrial School, 


200 00 


Sewer Department, 




Maintenance, 


1800 00 


Sinking Funds, 


1000 00 


Snow, 


1500 00 


Soldiers' Relief, 


900 00 


Spring Grove Cemetery, 


1000 00 


and receipts from sale of lots 




State Aid, 


* 1500 00 


Sidewalks, 


1500 00 


($250 to be spent under Betterment Act) 




Street Lighting, 


6000 00 


Town Officers, 


6500 00 


Town House, 


2000 00 


Tree Warden, 


250 00 


Gypsy and Browntail Moth Department, 


3250 00 


Water Department, 




Maintenance, 


10000 00 


Construction, 


3000 00 


Sinking Funds, 


750 00 


Total, 


$177500 00 


Estimated County Tax, 


14000 00 


Estimated State Tax, • 


23000 00 




$214500 00 



Article 4. Voted to recommend the sum of $200 for this pur- 
pose. 

Art. 5. Removal of pumping station not approved, but voted 
to recommend the sum of $250 be appropriated to abate 
nuisance arising from noise and smoke. 



94 



Art. 6. Approved. 

Art. 7. Referred to Board of Public Works. 

Art. 8. Approved, and voted to recommend the appropriation 
of $225 to install same. 

Art. 9. Approved. 

Art. 10. Approved. 

Art. 11. Voted that this be referred to the Board of Public 

Works. 
Art. 12. Not approved. 

Art. 13. Not approved. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
HENRY A. BODWELL 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
BERNARD M. ALLEN 
SAMUEL H. BAILEY 
GEORGE L. AVERILL 
ALBERT W. LOWE 
JOSEPH L. BURNS 
JOHN H. CAMPION 

Finance Committee 



9 b 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ESSEX, SS. : To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the first day of March, 1915, at 
6 o'clock a.m., to act on the following Articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three mem- 
bers of the School Committee for three years, two members of 
the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the 
Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for 
one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Me- 
morial Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one 
year, one Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, Pound Keeper, 
Fence Viewers, and any other officers the town may determine 
to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 
Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, 
Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 
Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, 

96 



Parks and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public 
Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Acts of 1912, Redemption 
of Water Bonds and Andover Loan Bonds, Schools, School 
Houses, School Books and Supplies, Industrial School, Sewer 
Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Snow, Soldiers' Relief, 
Spring Grove Cemetery, Sidewalks, State Aid, Street Lighting, 
Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, Moth Department, 
Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking Funds, and other 
town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$500 for repairs on the old schoolhouse at Ballard Vale, on recom- 
mendation of the Selectmen. 

Article 5. — To see what action the town will take in regard 
to the removal of the Brick Pumping Station on Bancroft Road 
and the installation of a pumping station to take its place in a 
vault made for the purpose, said pumping station to be run 
by electricity instead of oil, and the appropriation of a sufficient 
sum of money for this purpose, on petition of Fred M. Temple 
and others. 

Article 6. — To hear the report of the School Committee on 
High School plans, and to see if "the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred thousand ($100,000) dollars 
for the purpose of building and equipping a new high school 
building, and making the necessary changes in the Central 
Heating Plant, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will vote to extend the sewerage 
system to Abbott and Marland Villages, and appropriate a sum 
of money therefor, on petition of Daniel Hart and others. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will appropriate money for a 
fire alarm box to be located near the residence of John E. Hutche- 
son on Summer Street, on petition of John J. Cady and others. 

Article 9. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$1500 to erect a barn and shed for the purpose of housing the 

97 



horses, carts, plows, wagons, watering carts, and other properties 
under the care of the Board of Public Works, on petition of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$200 to be spent for band concerts, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will vote to extend the water 
system from its present terminal at the residence of Horace E. 
Dyer on Rocky Hill Road, to the residence of Samuel Thomes, 
a distance of about 1400 feet, on petition of Samuel Thomes and 
others. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will vote to assume the care 
of the Rogers Brook, so-called, from Main Street to Morton 
Street, and to see what sum of money the town will appropriate 
to pay the cost of the same, to provide adequate drainage, on 
petition of W. E. Lombard and others. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will provide for the removal 
of dump and ashes, under the care of the Board of Public Works, 
and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of the 
Andover Village Improvement Society. 

Article 14. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year. 

Article 15. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 16. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 17. — To act upon the Report of the Town Officers. 

Article 18. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

98 



Article 19. — To determine what disposition shall be made 
of unexpended appropriations. 

Article 20. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock a.m., and may be closed at 
2 o'clock p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least, before the 
time of said meeting, as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this thirteenth day of February, 
A.D. 1915. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of Andover 



99 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Rev. E. VICTOR BIGELOW Rev. C. W. HENRY 
Rev. NEWMAN MATTHEWS S. H. BOUTWELL 
FRANK T. CARLTON HARRY M. EAMES 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY H. NOYES 

Trustees 



100 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



PRINCIPAL FUND 




1914 






January 1st 






Cash in Bank, 


$ 1805 53 




Real Estate Mortgages, 


74648 75 


$76454 28 






December 31st 






Real Estate Mortgages and Bonds 


$75988 75 




Cash in Bank, 


465 53 


$76454 28 






January 1st 






Cash on hand, 


$1805 53 




Mortgages paid during year, 


8110 00 


$9915 53 


* 




December 31st 






Invested in New Mortgages 


$9450 00 




Cash on hand, 


465 53 


$9915 53 


INCOME 






January 1st 






Cash on hand, 


$1248 42 




Interest on Mortgages and Bonds, 


3576 22 








$4824 64 


EXPENDITURES 






N. C. Hamblin, Principal, 


$ 800 00 




Edna G. Chapin, Instructor, 


850 00 




Louise M. Farnsworth, Instructor, 


595 00 




Helen M. Dunn, Instructor, 


240 00 




Caroline M. Davis, Instructor, 


800 00 




Insurance, 


41 00 


- 


Andover Nat'l Bank, Security Box, 


5 00 




Harry H. Noyes, Treasurer, 


200 00 




Expense, 


12 45 




Henry Wardwell, Legal Services, 


50 00 




Cash on hand, 


1231 19 


<kAZOA «A 



101 



BARNARD FUND 




January 1st 




Cash on hand, 


25 50 


Dividends, 


40 00 


Prizes awarded, 




1st prize, Arthur Rand Lewis, 


20 00 


2nd prize, Katherine Annette Berry, 


12 00 


3rd prize, Hector Newman, 


8 00 


Cash on hand, 


25 50 



$65 50 



$65 50 

DRAPER FUND 

January 1st 

Cash on hand, $1257 94 

Interest, 50 80 

$1308 74 

Balance, $1308 74 

GOLDSMITH FUND 

January 1st 

Cash on hand, $251 72 

Interest, 10 14 

$261 86 



Prizes awarded, 

Girls' Prize, Ada Brewster, '15, 5 00 

Boys' Prize, Eldred Wilson Larkin, '16, 5 00 

Cash on hand, 251 86 

$261 86 

HARRY H. NOYES, 

Treasurer 
Examined and found correct, 

FRANK T. CARLTON 

Auditor 
February 5, 1915 



102 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The Trustees hereby submit to the Town their annual Report 
for 1914, together with the complete Report of the Librarian. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
C. C. CARPENTER 
JOHN ALDEN 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
GEORGE F. SMITH 
BURTON S. FLAGG 

Trustees 
Andover, Feb. 16, 1915 



103 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
In account with the Town of ANDOVER, MASS. 



RECEIPTS 



Balance from last year, 

Income from Investments 

Town Appropriation 

Dog Tax 

Fines 

Gifts 



EXPENDITURES 

Salaries 

Lighting and heating 

Books, periodicals, etc. 

Bookbinding 

Repairs, etc. 

Pictures repaired 

Cash on hand 



$3188 


20 


3214 


79 


2300 


00 


696 


76 


142 


57 


8 


75 



$9551 07 



$3057 


13 


512 


01 


887 


93 


314 


34 


315 


79 


16 


08 


4447 


79 



$9551 07 



In the above statement of expenditures is included the cost 
of maintaining the Ballardvale Branch Library, which, itemized, 
is as follows: — 

Running expenses, salaries, etc. 
Lighting and heating 
Repairs and supplies 
Books purchased 

$416 93 
104 



$219 00 


19 


80 


62 


88 


115 


25 



Statement of Income and Expenses of the Trustees of Memorial 
Hall Library for the Year Ending January 20, 1915 



Income from investments 

Town appropriation 

Dog Tax 

Gifts 

Fines 

Total 



Maint. 


Books 


Cornell 


Total 


$2117 13 


$743 48 


$354 18 


$3214 79 


2300 00 






2300 00 


696 76 






696 76 


3 75 


5 00 




8 75 


141 57 


1 00 




142 57 


S5259 21 


749 48 


354 18 


S6362 87 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 


$2953 45 




103 68 


3057 13 


Lighting and heating 


398 46 




113 55 


512 01 


Books, periodicals, etc. 


159 90 


728 03 




887 93 


Bookbinding 


314 34 






314 34 


Repairs, etc. 


315 79 






315 79 


Pictures repaired 






16 08 


16 08 


Total 


$4141 94 


728 03 


233 31 


5103 28 


Unexpended reserve 


*$1117 27 


21 45 


120 87 


1259 59 



*This reserve is held for 

(a) Fire Escape — ordered by State Inspector of Buildings. 

(b) New Heating Plant. 



Condition of Funds and Unexpended Income on hand Jan. 20, 1915 



Maintenance Fund 
Book Funds, General 
Book Funds, Special 
Cornell Fund, Permanent 
Cornell Fund, Purchase 
Special 

Total 



Funds 


Unex. Inc. 


$46600 00 


$2319 22 


13600 00 


255 09 


3200 00 


341 34 


5000 00 


. 241 20 


2700 00 


1084 85 




64 94 


$71100 00 


$4306 64 



105 



INVESTMENTS 

Bangor & Aroostook R. R., 4s 

Boston Elevated Co., 4s 

Chicago Railways Co., 5s 

Montreal Tramways Co., 5s 

Michigan State Tel. Co., 5s 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 

Boston Elevated Co., 43^s 

Boston & Maine R. R., 4s 

Boston & Albany R. R. Co., 4^s, Equip. Trust 

Savings Banks 

Mortgage on Real Estate, 5% 

Am. Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 shs. 

Principal, Cash 

Total 

Income cash on hand 
Principal cash on hand 

Total cash on hand 



$11000 00 

10000 00 

9962 50 

9962 50 

4981 25 

1000 00 

1000 00 

2000 00 

2981 10 

13500 00 

4000 00 

571 50 

141 15 

$71100 00 

$4306 64 
141 15 

$4447 79 



FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL, Treas. 



We certify that we have examined and found correct the 
above statements as of January 20, 1915, whereby all securities 
held against the several funds have been examined and the 
income accruing from same accounted for. 

All disbursements are supported by receipts in proper form 
and the cash on deposit as shown has been verified and found 
correct. 

BURTON S. FLAGG 
GEORGE F. SMITH 

Auditors 



106 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the library for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1914. 

The circulation for the year is 41130 volumes as opposed to 
35737 last year. Of this number, 33138 books were issued at the 
main library and 7992 at Ballardvale. This record for a town 
of 7300 people shows a very satisfactory average per person and 
considering the branch alone, a truly remarkable use. 

The constant development of the work at Ballardvale and the 
evident satisfaction and pride taken by the village in its library 
is proof that a wise step was taken in establishing it. The 
branch now has 837 volumes belonging to it and 143 loaned from 
the main library. These loans are now less frequently exchanged. 
Some new books are furnished each month and so far as possible 
the requests of readers are met. The juvenile books are con- 
stantly in demand, and one year has proved that the children of 
Ballardvale are more careful in the treatment of the library 
books than the children of Andover. Of two copies of the same 
book, that sent to the branch circulates more times before having 
to be rebound and is then in cleaner condition, than the one 
provided for the Memorial Hall Library. 

The plan when starting this branch was to let it gradually 
become a reading-room, if the desires of the community de- 
veloped in that direction. This fall, with the coming of colder 
weather, the branch librarian reported a decided tendency in 
people to linger and read. To meet this need, another table 
and more chairs were provided. An electric light was also 
placed at the top of the steep side steps that form its chief ap- 
proach. 

There seems no doubt that the Ballardvale branch is now an 
established and vital part of our library and no reason why it 
should not continue to do good work for years. The circulation 
may not always remain at the height reached during its first 
popularity; it will probably drop somewhat and find its fixed 

107 



normal, as is the case with all libraries. A few Ballardvale 
people still prefer to take their books from the main library 
and these are mostly families having children who come up 
daily to the High School, or men who want technical and scholarly 
works that a branch naturally would not have. The percentage 
of fiction borrowed is much larger than in Andover, but as the 
collection of books increases, they will doubtless be used for 
other purposes than recreative reading alone. But in furnishing 
the village with good and wholesome fiction only, we may con- 
sider the establishment of this branch more than justified. 

Another plan outlined in last year's report has been carried 
out. This was to provide more adequate service for the three outly- 
ing district schools. Four traveling libraries have been purchased, 
each containing twenty-five books, with no duplicates. With 
the co-operation of the School Department, these libraries are 
to be loaned for stated periods to these distant schools. The 
sloyd classes are to provide shelves for their accommodation 
and the School Department will attend to their transportation. 
These libraries were ready for use on November first, but will 
not be placed in use until the winter term. With each library 
were provided some books especially for the use of the teacher. 
These collections will be valued by the school children who are 
prevented by distance from ready use of the library. The 
selection was carefully made, and while helpful and instructive, 
the books are all those that have been proved by actual experi- 
ence to be liked and enjoyed by children. 

The gifts of the year include several hundred volumes left 
us by the will of Miss Margaret Gray. Most of these books 
duplicated works already on our shelves, but were of use for 
Ballardvale. The most valuable among them was an unbound 
file of the International Studio. These have been bound and 
placed in the Memorial Hall Library. At Ballardvale, four 
little girls, the "October Club", contributed two dollars with 
the request that four books be purchased for the children's 
shelves. Other gifts have been made, books, money, and many 
plants and flowers, — always appreciated. Pansies that blos- 
somed out of doors in December were our last garden flowers for 
the season. 

108 



In the report for 1913, attention was called to the difficulty 
of protecting our young people from harmful literature, both 
books and periodicals. Our periodical list contains only such 
publications as are above criticism on the score of sensationalism 
or questionable fiction or pictures. Practically all appear upon 
the "White List of Periodicals" approved by the Massachusetts 
Library Club. 

Our juvenile books are chosen with the greatest care. The 
parents of Andover may feel absolutely sure that their children 
will obtain from the library no questionable story, for a book 
has to pass searching tests of material, style, ethics and good 
taste before it is admitted to our juvenile shelves. This collection 
now numbers about two thousand and it is our purpose to keep 
it small but select. The children are growing up all the time 
and new books, that is, new titles, are not so much in demand 
in this department, because the old favorites remain and the 
children themselves are always new, every year. We have 
constantly to replace standard juvenile authors, and we buy the 
best of the new stories, and books showing how to make and do 
things. Our teachers' fund also permits us to purchase books 
that are helpful along the lines of school studies, history, science, 
etc. We have withdrawn from the shelves this year a number 
of juvenile books. This is partly from lack of room, but largely 
because these children's books of an older generation, often 
otherwise unobjectionable, are not accurate in the scientific or 
historical information they convey. The use of this department 
is satisfactory; the proportion of children's books circulated 
being about one-third of the total number. The reference use 
of the library is large, particularly with the High School. 

It is probable that the European war, expected to clear away 
so many difficulties and to adjust so many delicate balances, is 
going to have a pronounced influence upon the character of the 
fiction published. People are now occupying their brains with 
other problems than debatable stories or unpleasant discussions. 
English writers have been the chief offenders in this respect but 
American ones have not been far behind. The whole tone of 
the English-speaking press has changed during the last four 
months. With something really big to attract attention, with 

109 



pressing economic questions to adjust, there has been less " muck- 
raking". Moreover, at a time when no state or individual will 
spend money without forethought, it will be less easy for ques- 
tionable fiction to get on the market. There has already been 
an improvement in our press publications and it seems likely 
that this change will continue. 

To meet the marked and natural interest in a contest in- 
volving so much of the so-called civilized world, we have pur- 
chased a dozen or more books bearing on international relations. 
These have received steady use and there is a wide-spread 
revival of interest in European history and geography. 

It is hoped another year to replace in the reference room 
some works that are out-dated and past their helpfulness. 

On x^pril first, Mr. Ballard Holt, who had served the town 
for practically forty years, first as librarian of the Memorial Hall, 
and after the re-organization of the library, as caretaker, resigned 
his position. The faithful service of Mr. Holt was appreciated 
by the many Andover people who knew him during his long 
period of public work. 

We have now, only to present our annual story of over- 
crowded shelves and a reading-room too small for the number 
of people who use it. Not only that, but of a heating-apparatus 
inadequate through age and wear to the needs of the building. 
During the cold weather last February, we were obliged to close 
one day because the best efforts of the janitor failed to get the 
library thermometer above thirty-nine degrees. During even 
a moderately cold snap, a temperature of around fifty is not 
uncommon, and under such conditions people complain because 
we cannot keep the reading-room properly ventilated. 

By weeding out all little-used or out-dated books, by ceasing 
to bind periodicals of which we have always kept a file, and by 
relegating to an already packed attic, sets that ought to be more 
accessible, we can still purchase the new books that the com- 
munity has a right to expect from us. But the question is, how 
long can we keep on buying books when we sometimes have to 
move three hundred in order to put one in its proper place on 
the shelf? 

Not long ago, a member of the school committee said to us: 

110 



"I have always found the town of Andover ready to respond 
to any reasonable request. When we asked for more money to 
pay our teachers, we got it. The trouble with you is, that you 
have never asked the town for the funds you need." 

It is true that we have not, and it is also true that the town 
meeting of Andover is made up of reasonable citizens. They 
are taxpayers to be sure, but let them consider what they are 
getting for the money invested in the library. There are 7300 
people in Andover. This year, the town contributed for our 
support S2300, — about thirty-four cents per capita for twelve 
months! In return for this absurdly small sum, each individual 
had the free use of about 20000 volumes, 1000 of which were 
new during the year, with over fifty current periodicals and 
papers, to say nothing of expert service in finding information 
upon any desired subject. 

Has any tax-payer in Andover invested thirty-four cents — 
for the year — in any other method that brings in returns in 
like proportion, to him and to his children? Is it unreasonable 
to think that our town would respond to a request that, once 
answered, would not be repeated for a generation to come? 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDNA A. BROWN 

Librarian 



111 



STATISTICS OF THE LIBRARY 

Number of books issued for home use at Memorial Hall, 33138 

Number issued at Ballardvale 7992 

Total. 41130 

Books sent to the districts, 1668 

Percentage of fiction circulated, 70 

Percentage of non-fiction circulated, 30 

New borrowers registered, 1914, 359 

Actual number of cards in use, 2285 

Books added by purchase, 805 

Books added by gift, 234 

Total accessions, 1039 

Books withdrawn, worn out, lost and paid for, 191 

Total number of books in library, 21817 

Volumes rebound, 423 

Volumes, bound . periodicals, etc. 128 

BALLARDVALE 

Number of books issued for home use, 7992 

Percentage of fiction circulated, 84 

Percentage of non-fiction circulated, 16 

Number of cards in use, 308 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

Gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from state 
and government departments, from other libraries, from so- 
cieties, the Andover Village Improvement Society, Phillips 
Academy Library, the October Club, and from the following 
individuals: 

Mrs. J. R. Ash ton; Miss G. H. Averill; Miss E. F. Brown; 
S. T. Byington; Miss J. B. Carpenter; E. W. Chapin; F. J. 
Firth; Miss M. E. Gray; David Hewes; Prof. E. Y. Hincks; Mrs. 
H. E. Kendall; Dr. G. H. McCollum; W. A. Mowry; Alfred Rip- 
ley; George Ripley; William Shaw; Mrs. J. H. Smith; Mrs. J. P. 
Taylor; Miss J. E. Twichell. 

112 



LIST OF PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS TAKEN FOR THE 

READING ROOM 

American monthly review of reviews. 

Atlantic monthly. 

Blackwood's magazine. 

Bookman. 

Book review digest. 

Catholic world. 

Century. 

Country gentleman. 

Christian Endeavor world, (gift). 

Congressional world, (gift). 

Country life in America. 

Craftsman. 

Cumulative book index. 

Education. 

Elementary school journal. 

Forum. 

Garden magazine, (gift). 

Guide to nature, (gift). 

Harper's magazine. 

House beautiful, (gift). 

Independent. 

International studio, (gift). 

Ladies' home journal. 

Library journal. 

Life. 

Literary digest. 

Littell's living age. 

London weekly Times. 

Missionary review of the world. 

Modern mechanics and Popular electricity. 

Nation. 

National geographic magazine. 

Nineteenth century. 

North American review. 

Outing. 

Outlook. 

113 



Popular mechanics. 

Popular science monthly. 

Practical engineer. 

Public libraries. 

Punch, (gift). 

Readers' guide to periodical literature. 

St. Nicholas. 

School arts magazine. 

Scientific American. 

Scribner's magazine. 

Survey. 

Technology review, (gift). 

Official gazette, (gift). 

Woman's Home Companion. 

World's work. 

Youth's companion. 

Andover Townsman. 

Boston Advertiser. 

Boston Herald. 

Boston Transcript. 

Christian Science Monitor, (gift). 

Lawrence Telegram. 

New York Times. 



114 



INFORMATION FOR USERS OF THE LIBRARY 

The Memorial Hall Library is open every day except Sundays 
and legal holidays from 9 to 12.30 in the morning, and from 3 to 
9 in the afternoon and evening. 

Any resident of Andover over ten years of age may have a 
library card upon filling out an application blank. Children in 
grades below the Punchard School, are required to have their 
applications endorsed by both parent and teacher. 

All grown people are allowed to take two books, provided 
that one only is fiction. This privilege is also given to the 
Punchard pupils. Teachers are permitted to draw ten books 
strictly for school use. These books are subject to the ordinary 
rules of the library. 

Books are issued for fourteen days, the date upon which the 
book is due being stamped plainly on the "date due" slip at the 
time of issue. A book kept overtime incurs a fine of two cents 
for every day overdue. A few of the books most in demand are 
issued for seven days only. All these are labeled upon the book 
pocket, "Seven day book". Books lost or damaged must be 
paid for. 

Seven day books are not renewed or reserved for anyone. 
Other books may be renewed if no one else has asked for them, 
and if a work not fiction, is specially desired for any serious 
purpose, notice of its return to the library will be sent on request. 
The shelves of the whole library are open to all grown people. 
The books are arranged according to subjects, and it is often 
much more satisfactory to go to the shelves and examine the 
books than to depend upon the catalogue. 

The only complete index of the contents of the library is the 
card catalogue. The printed catalogue of the books was issued 
ten years ago, and is out-of-date, besides containing the names 
of many books which are no longer in the library. The new books 
are listed at intervals in the weekly paper, and cumulated in the 
yearly library report, but the only complete record is the card 
catalogue. This catalogue is arranged alphabetically like a 
dictionary. To find whether any given book is in the library, 
look for it under the surname of the author, or under its title. 
The right hand drawers of the case contain a second arrange- 

115 



ment of cards where the books are entered according to the 
subjects of which they treat. 

The new books purchased each month are placed for some 
weeks in a special case on the north side of the reading room, 
so that the most recent additions to the library may be found 
there. The library buys only a limited amount of new fiction, 
but it tries to fill the wants of the community in regard to other 
books desired. People are invited to suggest for purchase the 
titles of books they wish. 

The library staff is always glad to answer questions or in any 
way to help visitors find what they want. 



116 



NEW BOOKS ADDED IN 1914 



State and government documents such as the Massachusetts Acts and Re- 
solves, Manual of the General Court, etc., and annual reports regularly 
received and kept on file in the library for reference are not listed. Duplicates 
purchased for Ballardvale or for the traveling school libraries are also not 
included. 

GENERAL REFERENCE BOOKS 

040 A51 American Library Association. Index to general litera- 
ture, supplement 1900-1910. 

917.446 B67d Boston, Mass. Directory, 1914. 

345.42 M38o *Mass.-Attorney general. Official opinions, 1905-12. 

423 S785 New Standard Dictionary. 

920.07 W62 Who's who in America, 1914-15. 

317 W89 World almanac, 1914. 

PERIODICALS 

051 A881 Atlantic monthly, v. 112. 

052 B56 Blackwood's Edinburgh magazine, v. 194. 

051 C33 Century, v. 87, 88. 

052 C76 Contemporary review, v. 104. 
705 C84 Craftsman, v. 25, 26. 

052 E21 Edinburgh review, v. 217, 218. 

051 F77 Forum, v. 50. 

716 G16 *Garden magazine, v. 18, 19. 

051 H23 Harper's magazine, v. 127-129. 

705 H81 *House. beautiful, v. 34, 35. 

705 161 international studio, v. 51-53. 

020.5 L61 Library journal, v. 38. 

051 L71 Littell's living age, v. 279-281. 
071 N21 Nation, v. 97. 

910.5 N21 National geographical magazine, v. 24, pt. 2, 25, pt. 1. 

052 N62 Nineteenth century, v. 75. 

051 N81 North American review, v. 198. 

799.5 094 Outing, v. 63, 64. 

051 094 Outlook, v. 105-107. 

621 P81 Popular mechanics, v. 20, 21. 

505 P81 Popular science monthly, v. 83. 

020.5 P96 Public libraries, v. 18. 



Gifts 



117 



051 R23 Review of reviews, v. 48. 

051 S 147 St. Nicholas, v. 41. 

605 S416 Scientific American, v. 109. 

051 S434 Scribner's magazine, v. 54. 

305 S96 Survey, v. 30, 31. 

051 W89 World's work, v. 27, 28. 

ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS BOOKS 
(Purchased chiefly from the Phillips Fund) 

172.4 A58 Angell, Norman. The great illusion. 
220.9 B22 Banks, E. J. Bible and the spade. 
252 B81q Brown, C. R. Quest of life. 

131 CI 1 Cabot, R. C. What men live by. 

225.5 F91 *Firth, F. J. ed. Holy gospel; a comparison of the Prot- 

estant and Roman Catholic versions. 

173 G92 Gruenberg, S. M. Your child to-day and to-morrow. 
266 H55 Hill, J. L. The immortal seven. 

612 H76 Hood, M. G. For girls and the mothers of girls. 

193 K13 Kant, Immanuel. Critique of pure reason. 

268 S63g *Slattery, Margaret. Girl in her teens. 

267.6 W46 * Wells, A. R. Expert endeavor. 

GENERAL ECONOMICS 

174 A42 Allen, F. J. The law as a vocation. 

325 A63 Antin, Mary. They who knock at our gates. 

362 C16 Cannon, I. M. Social work in hospitals. 

320 D68 Dole, C. F. The American citizen. 

658 D97 Dwyer, I. E. The business letter. 

396 L36 Laughlin, C. E. The workaday girl. 

396 N27 Nearing, Scott. Woman and social progress. 

374 R25w Reely, M. K. comp. Selected articles on world peace. 

328 R541 Roberts, K. L. comp. Club woman's handybook. 

194.4 R76 Rousseau, J. J. Social contract. 

396 S95 Sumner, H. L. Equal suffrage. 

320 W15 Wallas, Graham. Human nature in politics. 

396 W37 Weaver, E. W. Vocations for girls. 

331.4 W86 Woods, R. A. Young working girls. 

BOOKS ON EDUCATION 

(Purchased from the Phillips Fund for Books for Teachers) 

371.9 A97 Ayres, L. P. Laggards in our schools. 

372.5 B153 Bailey, H. T. Art education. 

371 B46 Betts, G. H. New ideas in rural schools. 

371 B46r Betts, G. H. The recitation. 

118 



370.1 B62 Bloomfield, Meyer. Vocational guidance of youth. 

372.6 C15 Campagnac, E. T. Teaching of composition. 

371.4 C67 Cole, P. R. Industrial education in the elementary 

school. 

372.6 C77 Cooley, A. W. Language teaching in the grades. 

370 C89 Cubberley, E. P. Changing conceptions of education. 

371 C89 Cubberley, E. P. Improvement of rural schools. 
370 D51i Dewey, John. Interest and effort in education. 
370 E42e Eliot, C. W. Education for efficiency. 

370 E42t Eliot, C. W. Tendency to the concrete and the practical 

in modern education. 

370 E53 Emerson, R. W. Education. 

373 E92 Evans, G. W. Teaching of high school mathematics. 

370 H38 Henderson, C. H. What is it to be educated? 
371.9 H87 Huey, E. B. Backward and feeble-minded children. 
371.1 H99 Hyde, W. DeW. Teacher's philosophy. 

372 K55 Kilpatrick, W. H. The Montessori system examined. 

373 L58 Lewis, W. D. Democracy's high school. 
371.9 M27 Maennel, B. Auxiliary education. 

377 P18 Palmer, G. H. Ethical and moral instruction in schools. 

371.1 P18 Palmer, G. H. Ideal teacher. 

371.1 P42 Perry, A. C. Status of the teacher. 

371.1 P94 Prosser, C. A. Teacher and old age. 

371 S664e Smith, W. H. Evolution of Dodd. 

370.1 S77 Snedden, David. Problem of vocational education. 

372.7 S96 Suzzallo, Henry. Teaching of primary arithmetic. 
372.4 S96 Suzzallo, Henry. Teaching of spelling. 

371.1 T27 Terman, L. M. The teacher's health. 

370 T39 Thorndike, E. L. Individuality. 

371.4 T75 Trowbridge, A. W. The home school. 

370.1 W40 Weeks, R. M. The people's school. 

BOOKS FOR THE HOME AND FARM 

646 A43 Allington, S. M. Practical sewing and dressmaking. 

635 B63 Bolte, J. W. Backyard farmer. 

643 C43 Child, G. B. The efficient kitchen. 

635 C81 Corbett, L. C. Garden farming. 

649 D37 Delano and Mclsaac. American Red Cross textbook on 

hygiene and home care of the sick. 

595.7 Fll Fabre, J. H. C. Life of the fly. 

710 F25 *Farwell, P. T. Village improvement. 

646 G36 Gifford, M. K. Needlework. 

395 H14g Hall, F. H. Good form for all occasions. 

636.7 H33 Haynes, William. Practical dog keeping. 

645 H91 Hunter, G. L. Home furnishing. 

746 K68f Klickmann, Flora, ed. Home art book of fancy stitchery. 

119 



796 L72 


636.5 M22 


684 M13 


641 N31 


745 P931 


636.5 R56o 


749 S52 


634.9 C42 


613.7 B63 


793 C27 


790 C94 


796 H19 


391 H74 


796 P22 


796 T21 


793 T79 


716 A21 


716 A95 


728 B631 


792 B81 


759.4 B81 


781 D27 


621 H16 


745 H52 


740 K81 


750M78 


694 N87 


751 P79 


579 P89 


927.3 S42g 


537 S52 


740 S74 


750 S93 


627.9 T14 


654 V61 


745 W58m 


809 A56 


822 B17 


843 B43o 



Little, R. D. Tennis tactics. 
Macleod, Alice. Pigeon raising. 
McClure, Abbot. Making built-in furniture. 
Neil, M. H. Canning, preserving and pickling. 
Priscilla fancy work instruction books. 4v. 
Robinson, J. H. Our domestic birds. 
Shackleton, Robert. Charm of the antique. 
Cheyney and Wentling. Farm woodlot. 

GAMES AND AMUSEMENTS 

Bolton, Florence. Exercises for women. 

Castle, Vernon. Modern dancing. 

Curtis, H. S. Play and recreation for the open country. 

*Hanks, C. S. Hint's to golfers. 

Holt, Ardern. Fancy dresses described. 

*Park, William. Game of golf. 

Taylor, J. H. Golf; impressions, etc. 

Tucker and Ryan. Historical plays of colonial days. 

BOOKS ON MECHANICAL AND FINE ARTS 

Adams, H. S. Flower gardening. 

Averill, Mary. Japanese flower arrangement. 

Book of little houses. 

Browne, Van Dyke. Secrets of scene painting and stage 

effects. 

*Brownell, W. C. French art. 

Davenport, F. Elements of harmony and counterpoint. 

Halsey, F. A. Methods of machine shop work. 

Hicks, A. M. Craft of handmade rugs. 

Koch, G. W. Pencil sketching. 

*Moore, George. Modern painting. 

Noyes, William. Design and construction in wood. 

Poore, H. R. Pictorial composition. 

Pray, L. L. Taxidermy. 

*Scott, Leader. Ghiberti and Donatello. 

Shafer, D. C. Harper's beginning electricity, 

*Speed, Harold. Practice and science of drawing. 

*Sturgis, Russell. Appreciation of pictures. 

Talbot, F. A. Lightships and lighthouses. 

Verrill, A. H. Harper's wireless book. 

White, Mary. More baskets and how to make them. 

LITERATURE, ESSAYS AND POETRY 

Andrews, Charlton. The drama to-day. 
Barker, Granville. Three plays. 
*Bazin, Rene. Les Oberle. 

120 



808 B43 
843 C36f 
822.33 C36 
809.2 C54 

821.08 C85 
843 F27 
808 F82 
822 G13m 
822 G13s 
822 G35 

821 G35f 
818 G79r 
809.2 H13 

822 K38s 
822 K38t 
822 K42 

810.9 L85 
822 M19s 
822 M19t 
822 M22 
421 M31 
821 M37e 
821 M37s 
817 M38 
809.2 M85 
809.2 N38 

821 N87w 
655 064 

822 P31w 

821 R45n 
824 R51f 
824 S19 
821.08 S53 

822 S53mi 
821 S748b 
830.7 W61 



Bennett, E. A. The author's craft. 
*Chantepleure, Guy. La folle histoire de Fridoline. 
*Chapin, E. W. Evenings with Shakespeare. 
Clark, B. H. Continental drama of to-day. 
*Crandall, C. H. Representative sonnets. 
*Favre de Coulevain. Sur la branche. 
Fowler, N. C. Stories and toasts for after dinner. 
Galsworthy, John. The mob. 
Galsworthy, John. Plays. 
Gibson, W. W. Daily bread. 

Fires. 
Friendly road. 

Dramatists of to-day. 

Servant in the house. 

The terrible meek. 
Kindling. 



Gibson, W. W. 
Grayson, David. 
Hale, E. E., Jr. 
Kennedy, C. R. 
Kennedy, C. R. 
Kenyon, Charles. 



Long, W. J. American literature. 

Mackaye, Percy. Sanctuary. 

Mackaye, Percy. Thousand years ago. 

MacMillan, Mary. Short plays. 

Manly and Powell. Manual for writers. 

Masefield, John. Everlasting mercy, etc. 

Masefield, John. Story of a round-house, etc. 

Masson, T. L. comp. Best stories in the world. 

Moses, M. J. American dramatist. 

Nettleton, G. H. English drama of the restoration. 

Noyes, Alfred. The wine-press. 

Author's desk book. 
Wolf of Gubbio. 

Neighborly poems. 
From the porch. 



Orcutt, W. D. 
Peabody, J. P. 
*Riley, J. W. 
Ritchie, A. I. T. 



Sampson, Alden. Studies in Milton. 
*Sharp, William, ed. Sonnets of the century. 
Shaw, G. B. Misalliance, etc. 
*Spenser, Edmund. Britomart. 
*Whitney, W. D. Brief German grammar. 



914.53 A42 
917.3 B14 
915.32 B95 

916.6 G65 
917.3 H89 
914.5 H97r 
914.14 L25 



DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

*Allen, Grant. Venice. 2v. 

Baedeker, Karl, comp. The United States. 

Burton, Sir R. F. Personal narrative of a pilgrimage to 

Al-Madinah and Meccah. 2v. 

Gordon, H. C. Woman in the Sahara. 

Hungerford, Edward. Personality of American cities. 

Hutton, Edward. Cities of Romagna and the marches. 

Lang, Andrew. Highways and byways in the border. 



121 



915.4 M92 
914.2 081a 
918.1 R67 

914.5 S55 
917.94 W85 



Munson, Arley. Jungle days. 

Osborne, A. B. As it is in England. 

Roosevelt, Theodore. Through the Brazilian wilderness. 

Sherrill, C. H. Stained glass tour in Italy. 

Wood, R. K. The tourist's California. 



BIOGRAPHY 



92 W213 
92 V285h 
92 H362 
92 S527h 
92 B813 
92 J233n 
92 R54 
92 M872 

929.2 H492 

92 P984 

927.3 S42r 
92 S822 
92 S851 
92 W591 



Durand, G. H. Joseph Ward of Dakota. 
♦Head, P. R. Van Dyck. 

Hegermann-Lindencrone, L. de. In the courts of memory. 
*Hudson, H. N. Shakespeare. 2v. 
*Hueffer, F. M. Ford Madox Brown. 
James, Henry. Notes of a son and brother. 
Mackie, R. L. Robert the Bruce. 

*Mowry, W. A. Recollections of a New England edu- 
cator. 

*Putnam, Eben, comp. Lieutenant Joshua Hewes and 
his descendants. 

Putnam, G. H. Memories of my youth, 1844-1865. 
*Scott, Leader. Luca della Robbia. 
Steiner, E. A. From alien to citizen. 
Stewart, E. P. Letters of a woman homesteader. 
Whitlock, Brand. Forty years of it. 
*Vital records of Abington, Brockton, Dunstable, Kings- 
ton, Reading, Tewksbury, Wakefield, West Bridgewater. 



HISTORY 



904 A88 
973 B38 
940.9 C84 
972 D37 
940 G76 
940.9 G78 
940.9 H25 
917.445 J13 
972 M83s 
973.74 R62th 
949.6 S39 
945 S44 
940.9 S63 
944 T17 
943 T65 
943 U85 
940.9 W89 



Atteridge, A. H. Famous modern battles. 

Beard, C. A. Contemporary American history, 1877-1913 

Cramb, J. A. Germany and England. 

De Lara and Pinchon. The Mexican people. 

Grant, A. J. History of Europe. 

Graves, A. K. Secrets of the German war office. 

Hart, A. B. The war in Europe. 

Jackson, S. E. Reminiscences of Andover. 

Morris, Charles. Story of Mexico. 

*Roe, A. S. Thirty-ninth regiment, M. V. I. 1862-65. 

Schurman, J. G. The Balkan wars, 1912-13. 

Sedgwick, H. D. Short history of Italy. 

Sladen, Douglas. Real "Truth about Germany". 

Tardieu, Andre. France and the alliances. 

Tower, Charles. Germany of to-day. 

Usher, R. G. Pan-Germanism. 

World's work. War manual. 



122 



FICTION 
Adams, S. H. The Clarion. 
Altsheler, J. A. Herald of the west. 
Andrews, M. R. S. Eternal masculine. 
Arnim, M. A. B. Pastor's wife. 
Austin, Mary. The lovely lady. 
*Barclay, F. L. C. The broken halo. 
Bennett, E. A. Price of love. 
Benson, E. F. Thorley weir. 
Benson, R. H. An average man. 
Benson, R. H. Mirror of Shalott. 
Bindloss, Harold. Prescott of Saskatchewan. 
Booth, E. C. The doctor's lass. 
Booth, E. C. The post-girl. 
Bosher, K. L. House of happiness. 
Brady, C. T. Island of the stairs. 
Brown, Alice. Paradise. 
Brown, Alice. Robin Hood's barn. 
Brown, H. D. Mr. Tuckerman's nieces. 
Bryant, Marguerite. Dominant passion. 
Buckrose, Mrs. J. E. Gay morning. ■ 
Burnham, C. L. The right track. 
Butler, E. P. Jack-knife man. 
Caine, Hall. Eternal City. 
Caine, William. Irresistible intruder. 
Conrad, Joseph. Chance. 
*Coppee, Francois. Days of my youth. 
Couch, A. T. Q. Hocken and Hunken. 
Crockett, S. R. Sandy. 
Crockett, S. R. Silver sand. 
Curtis, I. G. The congresswoman. 
Dawson, Coningsby. The raft. 
Dean, M. M. Bars between. 
De Morgan, William. W 7 hen ghost meets ghost. 
Doubleday, Roman. The Saintsbury affair. 
Doyle, Sir A. C. Poison belt. 
Duncan, Frances. My garden doctor. 
Erskine, Payne. Eye of dread. 
Ferber, Edna. Buttered side down. 
Ferber, Edna. Personality plus. 
Findlater, Mary. Crossriggs. 
Findlater, Mary. A narrow way. 
Fuller, C. M. Across the campus. 
Gordon, C. W. Patrol of the Sun dance trail. 
Grimshaw, Beatrice. Guinea gold. 
Hagedorn, Hermann. Faces in the dawn. 

123 



Hall, Holworthy. Henry of Navarre, Ohio. 

Hannay, J. O. General J6hn Regan. 

Hannay, J. O. Lost tribes. 

Hannay, J. O. Priscilla's spies. 

Hannay, J. O. The Simpkins plot. 

Harrison, Herbert. Lad of Kent. 

Harrison, H. S. Captivating Mary Carstairs. 

Hartman, L. F. The white sapphire. 

Hawkins, A. H. Phroso. 

Hay, Ian. Knight on wheels. 

Henry, O. Whirligigs. 

Hillis, N. D. Story of Phaedrus. 

Hinkson, K. T. A mesalliance. 

Hopkins, W. J. Burbury Stoke. 

*Hutchinson, E. S. Pair of little patent leather boots. 

Jacobs, W. W. Captains all. 

Jokai, Maurus. Hungarian nabob. 

Jokai, Maurus. The nameless castle. 

Jordan, Humfrey. Carmen and Mr. Dryasdust. 

Kirkland, Winifred. Boy editor. 

Lagerlof, Selma. Liliecrona's home. 

Lee, Jennette. Happy island. 

Lee, Jennette. Woman in the alcove. 

Lewis, Sinclair. Our Mr. Wrenn. 

Lincoln, J. C. Cap'n Dan's daughter. 

Lincoln, J. C. Woman-haters. 

Lincoln, N. S. Man inside. 

Locke, W. J. Fortunate youth. 

London, Jack. John Barley-corn. 

Lynde, Francis. Honorable Senator Sagebrush. 

Lynn, Margaret. Stepdaughter of the prairies. 

McCutcheon, G. B. Xedra. 

McCutcheon, G. B. Prince of Graustark. 

MacHarg and Balmer. The Surakarta. 

Marshall, Archibald. Honour of the Clintons. 

Martin, G. M. Selina. 

Martin, H. R. Barnabetta. 

Mason, A. E. W. Witness for the defence. 

Mitchell, J. A. Pines of Lory. 

Moffatt, Cleveland. Land of mystery. 

Murfree, M. N. Story of Duciehurst. 

Newlin, Katherine. Penelope intrudes. 

Norris, Kathleen. Saturday's child. 

Norris, Kathleen. The treasure. 

O'Brien, H. V. New men for old. 

Oppenheim, E. P. The vanished messenger. 

124 



Overland Red. 

♦Paine, A. B. "Peanut". 

Palmer, Frederick. The last shot. 

Peattie, E. W. The precipice. 

Peel, D. C. The hat shop. 

Phillpotts, Eden. Faith Tresilion. 

Phillpotts, Eden. The human boy. 

Pool, M. L. The Red-bridge neighborhood. 

Pratt, Lucy. Ezekiel expands. 

Reynolds, Mrs. B. Doubtful character. 

Rice, A. H. The Honorable Percival. 

Richards, Grant. Valentine. 

Richmond, G. L. S. Twenty-fourth of June. 

Ridge, W. P. Remington sentence. 

Rinehart, M. R. The afterhouse. 

Rinehart, M. R. Amazing adventures of Letitia Carberfy. 

Rinehart, M. R. Street of seven stars. 

Roberts, H. C. A free hand. 

Sidgwick, Ethel. Lady of desire. 

Sienkiewicz, Henryk. In desert and wilderness. 

Snedeker, C. D. The Spartan. 

Stanley, C. A. Keeper of the vineyard. 

Sterrett, F. R. The jam girl. 

Tarkington, Booth. Penrod. 

Turnbull, Margaret. Looking after Sandy. 

Van Schaick, George. Sweetapple Cove. 

Walpole, Hugh. Duchess of Wrexe. 

Ward, M. A. A. Delia Blanchflower. 

Warner, A. F. Sunshine Jane. 

Watts, M. S. Rise of Jennie Cushing. 

Webster, H. K. The butterfly. 

Wells, Carolyn. Anybody but Anne. 

Wells, H. G. History of Mr. Polly. 

Wells, H. G. Tono-Bungay. 

Wells, H. G. War of the worlds. 

Yeats, W. B. Stories of Red Hanrahan. 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS — NON-FICTION 

600 A42e Allen, N. B. Industrial studies; Europe. 

793 B15 Bailey, C. S. Children's book of games and parties. 

973 B29 Bass, Florence. Stories of pioneer life. 

796 B37s Beard, D. C. Shelters, shacks and shanties. 

790 B381 Beard, Patten. Jolly book of boxcraft. 

92 F854b Brooks, E. S. True story of Benjamin Franklin. 

92 G766br Brooks, E. S. True story of U. S. Grant. 

914.94 C15 Campbell, H. L. Story of little Konrad the Swiss boy. 

125 



796 C31c 
796 C31 
915 C35 
92 C967b 
927 C98 

595.7 D55 
620 D74 
973.3 D91 
940 E49 
973 E49s 
550 F15 
973.3 F54i 
914.56 G28 
92 L767g 
914.55 G87 
92 S431g 
938 G93g 
937 G93r 
914.92 H14 
680 H 14 
355 H18 
92 X161h 
929.9 H71 
927 H78 

917.3 H79 

398.4 J 15i 
904 J66 

915.6 K12 
92 A6681a 
292 L25t 
92 C7761 
398.2 L291 
398.4 L29t 
92 B6461 
398.2 L66 

821.08 L96b 
914.4 M14 
973 M227p 
398.4 M26 
598.2 M61f 
598.2 M61s 
533.6 M61 
92 L633mo 
970.1 M79 
926 P42 



Cave, Edward. Boy's camp book. 

Cave, Edward. Boy scout's hike book. 

Chamberlain, J. F. Asia. 

Custer, E. B. The boy general, George A. Custer. 

Cyr, E. M. Story of three great artists. 

Dickerson, M. C. Moths and butterflies. 

Doubleday, Russell. Stories of inventors. 

Duncan, R. B. Brave deeds of Revolutionary soldiers. 

Elson and MacMullan. Story of the Old world. 

Elson and MacMullan. Story of our country. 

Fairbanks, H. W. Stories of rocks and minerals. 

Fiske, John. War of Independence. 

Genn, C. T. Rome. 

Golding, Vautier. Story of David Livingstone. 

Grierson, Elizabeth. Florence. 

Grierson, Elizabeth. Sir Walter Scott. 

Guerber, H. A. Story of the Greeks. 

Guerber, H. A. Story of the Romans. 

Hall, M. E. Dutch days. 

Hall, A. N. The handy boy. 

Hammond, Harold. West Point. 

Hathaway, E. V. Napoleon, the little Corsican. 

Holden, E. S. Our country's flag. 

Home and Scobey. Stories of great artists. 

Hotchkiss, C. W. Representative cities of the United 

States. 

Jacobs, Joseph. Indian fairy tales. 

Johonnot, James. Stories of heroic deeds. 

Kaleel, M.J. When I was a boy in Palestine. 

Lang, Andrew. Story- of Joan of Arc. 

Lang, Andrew. Tales of Troy and Greece. 

Lang, John. Story of Captain Cook. 

Lansing, M. F. ed. Life in the greenwood. 

Lansing, M. F. comp. Tales of Old England. 

Lindsay, C. H. Forbes- Daniel Boone, backwoodsman. 

Lippincott, Mrs. S. J. C. Stories from famous ballads. 

Lucas, E. Y. Book of verses for children. 

McDonald, E. B. Colette in France. 

McMaster, J. B. Primary history of the United States. 

Maeterlinck, Maurice. The bluebird for children. 

Miller, O. T. First book of birds. 

Miller, O. T. Second book of birds. 

Miller, C. M. Kitecraft and kite tournaments. 

Moores, C. W. Life of Abraham Lincoln. 

Moran, G. N. Kwahu the Hopi Indian boy. 

Perry, F. M. Four American inventors. 



126 



793 P42 Perry, S. G. S. When Mother lets us act. 

353 R27 Reinsch, P. S. Young citizen's reader. 

92 N564r Richards, L. E. Florence Nightingale. 

92 C967 Sabin, E. L. On the plains with Custer. 

372 S62 Skinner and Lawrence. Little dramas for primary grades. 

338 T61 Toothaker, C. R. Commercial raw materials. 

970.1 W56 Wheeler, F. R. Boy with the United States Indians. 

810.9 W58 Whitcomb, I. P. Young people's story of American litera- 
ture. 

821.08 W61 Whittier, J. G. ed. Child life, a collection of poems. 

914.436 W67 Williams, Margery. Paris. 

904 W85 Wood, Eric. Boy's book of battles. 

STORIES FOR CHILDREN 

Altsheler, J. A. Apache gold. 

Altsheler, J. A. Guns of Bull Run. 

Altsheler, J. A. Guns of Shiloh. 

Altsheler, J. A. Scouts of Stonewall. 

Altsheler, J. A. Sword of Antietam. 

Altsheler, J. A. Texan triumph. 

Barbour, R. H. Around the end. 

Baylor, E. M. H. Little prospector. 

Brown, A. F. Lucky stone. 

Brown, E. A. When Max came. 

Bunyan, John. John Bunyan's dream story. 

Comstock, H. T. Camp* Brave Pine. 

Dudley, A. T. Following the ball. 

Dudley, A. T. A full-back afloat. 

Eaton, W. P. Boy scouts of Berkshire. 

Eaton, W. P. Boy scouts in the Dismal Swamp. 

Eaton, W. P. Boy scouts in the White Mountains. 

Forbes, C. B. Elizabeth's charm string. 

Forrester, I. Z. Those Preston twins. 

French, Allen. The runaway. 

Gilchrist, B. B. Helen and the Find-out club. 

Gilchrist, B. B. Helen and the uninvited guests. 

Gilchrist, B. B. Helen over-the-wall. 

Hough, Emerson. Young Alaskans in the Rockies. 

Jacobs and Richards. Blue Bonnet in Boston. 

Knipe, A. A. Captain of the eleven. 

Knipe, A. A. The last lap. 

Lothrop, H. M. S. Five little Peppers in the little brown house. 

Mason, A. B. Tom Strong, boy-captain. 

Mason, A. B. Tom Strong, Washington's scout. 

Paine, R. D. The steam-shovel man. 

Pearson, E. L. Voyage of the Hoppergrass. 

127 



Perkins, L. F. Irish twins. 

Pier, A. S. Grannis of the fifth. 

Quirk, L. W. Freshman eight. 

Remick, G. M. Glenlock girls at Camp West. 

Remick, G. M. Jane Stuart's chum. 

Richards, L. E. Quicksilver Sue. 

Smith, M. P. W. Two in a bungalow. 

Thurston, I. T. The torch bearer. 

Wallace, Dillon. Wilderness castaways. 

Wheeler, F. R. Boy with the United States explorers. 

Zollinger, Gulielma. Maggie McLanehan. 



128 



REPORT OF CUSTODIAN 
JOHN CORNELL ART GALLERY 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library : 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the report of the gallery for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1914. 

The attendance for the year has been 824. Of this number 
265 were adults and 559 children. The majority of the adult 
visitors have either been persons passing through the town, or 
tarrying here for a short time. All have expressed much interest 
in the collection, frequently asking if the townspeople came 
often to the gallery. 

Some of the children have been sent by their teachers for 
picture study. This is most encouraging and should be kept 
up. The children should feel that their visit to the gallery is for 
a definite purpose, and not an aimless one. They have an 
object in going to the library. It should be the same in regard 
to the gallery. 

The gallery has been greatly enriched by eight large steel 
engravings of Raphael's wonderful frescoes in the Stanze of the 
Vatican. These pictures are the gift of Mrs. Susan C. Dove, 
and should be much prized both for their value and as a me- 
mento of one who was keenly interested in art. It is most 
gratifying to see the interest shown in these fine reproductions, 
not only by many of the adults, but by some of the children. 

It is hoped that during the coming year many of the towns- 
people will visit the gallery for the express purpose of closely 
studying these great works of Raphael, thereby realizing as 
never before, his right to be called a master in space composition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABBIE S. DAVIS 

Custodian 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



FIFTEENTH 
ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD of PUBLIC WORKS 



EMBRACING THE TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 

WATER COMMISSIONERS AND EIGHTEENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SEWER 

COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1914 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1915 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

1889—1899 

JOHN H. FLINT *JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 

FELIX G. HAYNES 

SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

1893—1894 1894—1899 

*WM. S. JENKINS *WM. S. JENKINS 

JOHN L. SMITH JOHN L. SMITH 

CHAS. E. ABBOTT JOHN E. SMITH 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

1899—1902 1903—1906 

JOHN H. FLINT JOHN L. SMITH 

*WM. S. JENKINS FELIX G. HAYNES 

JOHN L. SMITH JOHN W. BELL 

♦JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD LEWIS T. HARDY 

FELIX G. HAYNES JAMES C. SAWYER 

1906—1907 

FELIX G. HAYNES JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy. 

JOHN W. BELL, Treas. LEWIS T. HARDY 

HARRY M. EAMES 

1907—1908 

FELIX G. HAYNES JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy. 

JOHN W. BELL, Treas. LEWIS T. HARDY 

ANDREW McTERNEN 

1908—1912 

LEWIS T. HARDY JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy. 

JOHN W. BELL, Treas. ANDREW McTERNEN 

WILLIS B. HODGKINS 

1913—1915 1913—1916 

ANDREW McTERNEN, Sec'y, '14 LEWIS T. HARDY 

WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas., '14 BARNETT ROGERS 

1913—1917 

THOMAS E. RHODES, Chairman, '14 

SUPERINTENDENT 

FRANK L. COLE 



♦Deceased. 



REPORT OF 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



To the Citizens of the Town of Andover: 

Your Board of Public Works submit their second annual report 
(actual service from May 5, 1913), which is also the twenty-sixth 
of the Water System, and the eighteenth of the Sewer System, 
for the year ending December 31, 1914. This is the new date 
for the fiscal year ending, and which brings two fiscal year endings 
in one calendar year. This is also the second annual report of 
the Highway and Park departments under the Board of Public 
Works. 

Organization 

On the re-election of T. E. Rhodes for three years, the per- 
sonnel of the Board of Public Works remain the same as last 
year, viz: Barnett Rogers, Lewis T. Hardy, Willis B. Hodgkins, 
Andrew McTernen, and Thomas E. Rhodes. The organization 
of the present Board of Public Works occurred March 10, 1914, 
with the following rank, viz: Chairman, Thomas E. Rhodes; 
Secretary, Andrew McTernen; Treasurer, Willis B. Hodgkins. 
On the resignation of Mr. F. L. Cole from the Water and Sewer 
departments these departments were supervised by Arthur R. 
Morse, clerk of the Board, until April 27, 1914, when there 
occured a vacancy in the Highway and Park departments by the 
dismissal of Mr. G. W. Wood. The Board then re-appointed 
Mr. F. L. Cole as Superintendent of all the departments under 
the control of the Board of Public Works. Mr. F. L. Cole was 
appointed for the ensuing political year, at a salary of $2000.00 
per year. On account of the impossibility for the Superintendent 
to efficiently supervise all the departments under his care, with 
a horse and carriage, the Board considered it wise to purchase a 
Ford truck for his use. The experiment proves a success. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

For a detailed account of the Water Department see the report 
of the Superintendent and the Comparative Statistics. There has 
been a decided increase of water main extension this year, nearly 
two miles. Our present milage is 49.64 miles a gain of 1.94 miles 
for the year 1914. With this increase of milage there has been an 
increase of hydrants, meters, service pipes in use, gallons pumped, 
net maintenance, net maintenance per million gallons, a decrease 
in pumping cost per million gallons, and a decrease in revenue 
from water rates and per million gallons. The unit cost per 
million gallons in 1913 was $56.42, the unit revenue per million 
gallons was $99.58, leaving a margin per million gallons of $43.16. 
In 1914 the unit cost per million gallons was $62.72, the unit 
revenue per million gallons was $83.47, a margin of only $21.35, 
a decrease of $21.81 in comparison to 1913. This great decrease 
in the relation of cost and revenue is accounted for, in part, by 
the change in the fiscal year ending from January 12, 1914, to 
December 31, 1914. This change deprives the year 1914 of a 
large part of the revenue from water rates due January 1, 1915. 
Another factor in affecting the relation between cost and revenue 
is the fluctuation of the cost of maintenance, which in the past 
has reached as high as 40%. The tendency of the cost of main- 
tenance to increase in the future is apparent from the fact that 
there must be a diminishing stability in the whole water system. 
We recommend that the sum of $10,000.00 be appropriated for 
maintenance, $6,000.00 for construction, and $750.00 for sinking 
fund. 

The Removal of the High Pressure Pumping Plant 

At the annual meeting of 1914, the question of the removal 
of the high pressure pumping plant was "referred back to the 
Board of Public Works to be reported at our next annual meet- 
ing." Your Board has considered the advisability and the merits 
of the request of those interested in the removal of this plant, 
and made some investigation related to this removal which will 
be given when necessary. The attitude of the Board is not 
unanimous as to the necessity of the removal of this plant, 
therefore, we would recommend that the voters give the question 



an impartial consideration and dispose of it according to their 
best judgment. 

The Water Bonded Debt. 

The bonded debt of the Water System is SI 84,000.00, the same 
as last year. In 1914 the balance of bonds authorized by the 
Town. S10, 000.00, were sold and S10, 000.00 of bonds formerly 
issued, were retired by the annual appropriation. Of the above 
amount of indebtedness, S50,000.00 is redeemable by sinking 
funds, which now amount to $29,984.13, and an appropriation of 
$750.00 is asked for the Sinking Funds Account. 

The money which comprises this fund has been distributed in 
eleven different savings banks at an average of 4% interest rate. 
In January of the current year The Andover National Bank 
made an offer to pay 4% interest, compounded semi-annually, 
on the total amount of money held by the Board with the 
exception of that in The Andover Savings Bank. As this offer 
included over SI 1,000.00 of Sewer Loans Funds then in the An- 
dover National Bank, drawing a nominal interest, the proposi- 
tion was accepted by your Board and the transfer of funds in 
various banks is being accomplished without loss of interest. 

THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 

For a detailed account of the Sewer Department see the report 
of the Superintendent. The chief feature to report in this de- 
partment is the repair and upkeep of the filter beds which have 
been excellent and satisfactory to the State Board of Health. 
There is one condition in our sewer department which is a source 
of expense and annoyance, this is the sewer pump on Phillips 
street. There are two ways to remedy this evil. One way is to 
install a new r pump of the centrifugal type with electric motive 
power, the other, and we believe, the most effective, is to con- 
tinue the sewer main down Central street to the Shawsheen 
river and empty therein. This plan would be along the lines 
proposed by the Abbott Milage sewer pian. This, of course, 
could only be done on the authority of the State Board of Health. 
We recommend that the sum of SI, 800. 00 be appropriated for 
maintenance. 



The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The sinking fund is $13,172.97, $3,000.00 of bonds mature in 
1919 and $30,000.00 in 1928, leaving net bonded debt of $19,- 
827.03. An appropriation of $1,000.00 is asked for. The Sewer 
Sinking Fund is now drawing interest at same rate as the water 
sinking fund. 

THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 
Highway Conditions 

Our highway conditions show marked improvement over last 
year, and we believe for the following causes, viz: 1 — A larger 
sum was appropriated ; 2 — a definite policy was pursued as to the 
character and direction of the improvement needed ; 3 — By 
efficient management which reflected in the quality, cost, and 
time results, and which compares favorably with contract work. 

We take this opportunity to thank the public for the many 
expressions of satisfaction for the work done this year. But our 
highways are far from being up to the standard that is required 
of a town of Andover's wealth. 

Because of the hilly character of Andover, highway construc- 
tion and maintenance presents some difhcults more accentuated 
than most towns. While a road can be built almost dustless and 
acceptable to automobiles travel it is very dangerous for the horse, 
and many complaints are made. We have tried to lessen the 
danger by putting sand on the road, but this is only a temporary 
remedy unless continuous and is objected, to on account of the 
dust. This phase of the problem is the most difficult to over- 
come. Observation suggests three propositions for experiment, 
viz: 1 — Divide the roadway in two parts, one part tarvia bound 
macadam for automobiles, the other part gravel surfaced for 
horse drawn vehicles. This would conflict with the laws of the 
road, a serious obstacle; 2 — Divide the road into trackways or 
wheel ways and horse-ways. The objection to this is that it is 
only practical with one horse drawn vehicles; 3 — Build a com- 
bination of tarvia bound macadam with a gravel surface and a 
light oil dressing. This construction consists of a one course 
tarvia bound macadam of sufficient depth covered with a coat 
of tarvia X and one to two inches of screened gravel rolled in the 

8 



tarvia and then loosen the surface with rakes and then cover 
with a coat of light dust oil. 

Main street is a source of expense and annoyance caused by 
the street railway company putting sand on their rails, and 
which creates dust in dry weather and mud in wet weather. 
This is a condition that our Superintendent has protested, and 
hope that in the future it will bear results. Immediately after the 
dust has been laid with oil or tarvia the street railway company 
begins to put sand on their rails, in a short time conditions are 
as bad as ever, more complaints, and another coat of oil, and so 
on indefinitely. 

Because of the transfer of horses and carts and other properties 
to the Board of Public Works there is an overcrowding of condi- 
tions for housing these properties, and which are inadequate and 
unsuitable. A great amount of town property is exposed to the 
weather and consequently wasted. A barn and shed is needed 
for the horses and carts, while the old barn can be used for storing 
property that is now unprotected. 

By petition of your Board the County Commissioners have 
made surveys of Walnut avenue, High street north of Walnut 
avenue, and Elm from Pine to the Square, but a report has not 
been made at present writing. The County Commissioners have 
informed your Board that they have petitioned the State High- 
way Commissioners for the taking over of Lowell street as a State 
Highway, but at present writing results are not known. 

Brook Street 

Your Board had planned the re-construction of Brook street, 
but when work had begun, to clear the way, the abutters at the 
easterly corner of Brook and Central streets raised the question 
of ownership of two large trees which obstructed the plan of re- 
construction. Work was suspended, and your Board petitioned 
the Board of Selectmen to take such action as was necessary to 
determine ownership and give to the Town a safe and suitable 
"layout". 

Highway Construction 

For a detailed account of highway work see the Superinten- 
dent's report. The first object of the Board was to save all the 

9 



macadam roads as far as possible before re-construction was 
begun. Several miles of macadam roads were saved by blanket- 
ing them with Tarvia B and sand, and which acted as a dust 
layer also. The most important work of re-construction was on 
Main, Park, Essex, and part of Harding streets. Park street 
was thoroughly drained by pulling up the old culverts and laying 
pipes in there place and by adding four catch-basins, and a two 
course Tarvia bound macadam. Essex street was under-drained 
and a one course Tarvia bound with a pea stone coat. This 
method of construction was tried as an experiment for the pur- 
pose of diminishing the smoothness that is characteristic of the 
two course Tarvia bound macadam. On Harding street above 
the bridge curbing was laid on each side of the street and a one 
course Tarvia bound macadam built from curbing to curbing 
and drain pipes laid from High street to the catchbasins on 
Harding street. With two new catchbasins and drain pipes laid 
on High street near the home of George Saunders to Harding 
street, the possibility of a washout on Harding street is very much 
diminished. Main street from Porter Road to Stimson Bridge 
received much attention and the greater part re-constructed with 
a two course Tarvia bound macadam. 

It must be evident to the citizens of And over that money is 
an important factor in road maintenance from the character and 
quantity of work done this year. It will take many years with an 
appropriation the same as this year to bring our highways up to 
the condition required of a town like Andover. Therefore, we 
should not appropriate less money for the coming year, but, if 
possible, more. 

A concise comparison of the work of like character accom- 
plished in 1913, with that of 1914, will accentuate the difference 
in managerial efficiency of the two years. With an increased 
expenditure of about 58% for mere roadway work we have the 
following difference in results. 

1914 Construction, 24612 sq. yds.; Resurfacing, 52020 sq. yds. 
1913 Construction, 9469 sq. yds.; Resurfacing, 20000 sq. yds. 



1914 Increase 15143 Increase 32020 

% 160. % 160. 

10 



1913, Drains and catchbasins, Pipe 1416 ft., Catchbasins 7 — 
cost, $1,928.00. 

1914, Drains and catchbasins, Pipe 1416 ft., Catchbasins, 7 — 
cost, $1,292.24. 

This difference in efficiency has been accomplished at a cost of 
about $1500.00 less than last year, and which affected results in 
all the departments. 

The Dust Laying Problem 

Because of the method of laying the dust this year there are 
some who question the validity of taxing for it. To disperse any 
doubt on this matter we will quote the law on this subject. 

Chapter 289 of the Acts and Resolves of 1909. — An Act 

Relative to the Sprinkling of Streets with 

Water and Other Liquid and Materials 

Section 1. "Any city or town may sprinkle or spread on its 
public ways, or parts thereof, water or any -liquid or material 
suitable for laying or preventing dust and preserving the surface 
thereof, and for sanitary purpose, and all statutes providing for 
watering such public ways shall apply to the use of such liquid 
and material, including the appropriation of money, the expendi- 
ture thereof at the expense of the city or town or of the abutters, 
the assessment upon abutting estates, and the collecting of such 
assessments and proceedings thereof." 

The foregoing statute is very clear on this point, and includes 
all that is necessary in road improvement and assessment. But 
our present method of taxing for dust laying is objectionable 
because of its inequality of assessing. Benefits are not in pro- 
portion to cost borne by the abutters. While benefits are ap- 
proximately equal the tax variation exceeds five hundred per 
cent, according to the lineal feet of frontage. The present 
method of taxing three and five cents per lineal foot could be 
changed to a uniform tax per tenant or establish a maximum 
number of feet to be taxed. We are of the opinion that a change 
should be made to equalize the burden. 

The cost of laying the dust this year was $1950.94 against 
$2267.29, in 1913, a decrease of $316.35. The revenue was 

11 



$1466.03, against $1151.42 in 1913, an increase of $314.61. This 
favorable showing in the decreased cost of laying the dust this 
year, with a greater area effected, is more apparent than real. 
This can be accounted for by the method employed which 
caused some of the expense which should come under the head of 
dust laying to creep into maintenance and construction, a condi- 
tion that can not be avoided by the method now employed. 
The increase of the revenue may be accounted for by the fact 
that the Board made a re-survey of the lineal feet and re-assess- 
ment which probably included many that had been overlooked 
in the past. 

Sidewalks 

There has been a general improvement in the conditions of our 
sidewalks, although there has been but little permanent walks 
built. The re-surfacing of our concrete walks have been extensive 
and the substitution of cinders and crushed stone for gravel is 
along the lines of betterment. A beginning has been made on 
the Haverhill street sidewalk and continued as far as money 
was available. We would recommend that work be continued on 
Haverhill street the coming year, and that $500.00 be allowed for 
the work, as much drainage is necessary to do the work effec- 
tively. 

There has been some effort to create an interest in the construc- 
tion of granolithic walks, but the movement does not show much 
force at present. 

We would recommend that the sum of $2500.00 be appropri- 
ated for sidewalks, $500.00 for Haverhill street, $500.00 to be 
used under the Abetterment Act, and the remainder for general 
sidewalk improvement. 

PARKS AND PLAYSTEAD 

For details on Parks and Playstead see the Superintendent's 
report. Our Parks have received but little attention along 
development lines, beyond the general upkeep. The Boulders 
were improved by the A. V. I. S. with the sanction and co- 
operation of your Board, in accordance with the vote of the 
Town at the last annual meeting at an expense of $200.00. The 
bleachers was roofed and a dressing room constructed under the 

12 



seats. The walling of the Brook in the Park which was begun 
last year was continued to the pond this year. We would re- 
commend that the sum of $1500.00 be appropriated for Parks 
and Playstead for the coming year. The inconsistency of having 
a band stand without band concerts is apparent, therefore, we 
recommend that the sum of $200.00 be appropriated for band 
concerts. 

Comparative Table of Expenditure Revenue 
for 1912, 1913, and 1914 





1912 
Revenue Expend. 


1913 
Revenue Expend. 


1914 
Revenue Expend. 


fHighways and Bridges $4000 00 
Drains 


$7136 57 


$8265 25 


$14127 85 
2235 36 


$25000 00 


$17113 08 


Sale of stone 


158 60 












Street Sprinkling 


1198 88 




1151 42 


984 4 


1466 03 


808 64 


Oil for streets 
Railroad taxes 


4155 23 




4659 56 


1284 85 


4609 78 




^Macadam 
Andover street 


3000 00 
3000 00 


4753 96 
2992 26 


2954 69 


1417 82 




13643 55* 


Salem street 


2000 00 


1999 76 










Elm square 
Horses and Drivers 


587 57 
2295 00 


608 09 
2295 00 


2790 55 








Salary 
Miscellaneous 


1200 00 


1200 00 


850 00 
450 00 




719 49 




Sidewalks 


1500 00 


1649 65 


2000 00 


1507 04 


1500 00 


1648 41 


Oil wagon, tools, etc. 
Snow 


1000 00 


781 24 


1500 00 

455 25 


1409 30 
420 59 


2500 00 


221 37 
2684 37J 


Sidewalk revenue 


143 65 








174 14 




Totals 
Balances 


$24248 93 


$23416 53 $25077 27 
832 40 


$23385 25 
1692 02 


$35969 44 $36119 74 
150 30° 



* This includes drains, catchbasins, and bridges, t Spent by G. W. Wood and gives an over- 
draft of $184.37 on Snow. c Overdraft caused by Snow. 

The expenditure for only roadway work in 1913 was $20,050.32, in 1914, was $31, 786.64, an 

increase of about 58%. 
+ This item should be changed to maintenance to comply with the accounting required by the 

State Laws and the accounting of the Board of Public Works. Tf This should also be 

changed to Construction to comply with the laws of the State and the Books of the Board 

of Public Works. 



THOMAS E. RHODES, 
BARNETT ROGERS, 
ANDREW McTERNEN, 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, 
LEWIS T. HARDY. 

Board of Public Works. 

13 



TO REDEEM WATER LOANS 



Dr. 



* 


No. 1 
$10,000 
Matures 

1920 


No. 2 
$10,000 
Matures 

1922 


No. 3 
$10,000 
Matures 

1923 


No. 4 
$15,000 
Matures 

1925 


No. 5 

$5,000 

Matures 

1928 




Balance from Jan. 1914 
Appropriation, 1914 
Int. on Investments 


$7815 53 
322 92 


$5804 93 
175 00 
234 46 


$5136 23 
300 00 
207 44 


$6819 97 
175 00 
284 44 


$2506 97 

100 00 

101 24 


$28083 63 

750 00 

1150 50 




$8138 45 


$6214 39 


$5643 67 


$7279 41 


$2708 21 


$29984 13 



WATER LOANS FUNDS DEPOSITED 




Ct. 




No. 1 


No. 2 


No. 3 


No. 4 


No. 5 


Total 


Andover Savings Bank . 


$1747 33 


$1717 82 


$1813 50 


$1268 50 


$1152 96 


$ 7700 11 


Broadway Savings Bank 


1314 22 


1490 23 


1818 09 






4622 54 


Lowell Inst, for Savings 


1007 18 




300 00 






1307 18 


Merrimack River S'v's B'k 


994 47 






1324 00 




2318 47 


City Inst, for Savings 


1008 50 










1008 50 


Lowell 5c Savings Bank 




1842 13 




1198 24 




3040 37 


Essex Savings Bank 


1706 49 










1706 49 


Mechanics Savings Bank . 










1555 25 


1555 25 


Lawrence Saving s Bank 


360 26 


, 




1643 71 




2003 97 


Haverhill Savings Bank 








1844 96 




1844 96 


Central Savings Bank . 




1164 21 


1712 08 






2876 29 




$8138 45 


$6214 39 


$5643 67 


$7279 41 


S2708 21 


$29984 13 



TO REDEEM SEWER LOANS 



$ 3,000 due 1919 
$30,000 due 1928 



D 



r. 



Balance on hand January, 1914 
Town of Andover, Appropriation, 1914 
Town of Andover, Sewer Assessments, 1914 
Interest on Deposits 



SEWER LOANS FUNDS DEPOSITED 



1153 85 

1000 00 

633 54 

38 i 58 



$13172 97 



Ct. 



Andover National Bank 
Salem 5c Savings Bank 



$11610 85 
1562 12 



$13172 97 



Nesbit G. Gleason 1 Examined 
W. H. Coleman Feb. 4, 1915 

J. S. Robertson J Auditors 



THOMAS E. RHODES 
LEWIS T. HARDY 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
BARNETT ROGERS 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 



Sinking 

Fund 

Commissioners 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen: I herewith present a brief record of the work 
of the Water and Sewer Departments, and the general condition 
of the plants and equipment for the year ending December 31, 
1914. 

MAINS AND HYDRANTS 

The system of mains has been extended during the year 1914 
as follows: 

Burnham Road — Connecting two dead-ends, 1785 ft. of 6-inch 
main, two hydrants, one 6-inch gate, at a cost of $1381.50, or 
about 773^c a running foot. 

Dufton Road — 522 ft. of 6-inch main, one 6-inch gate, at a 
cost of $381.45, or 73c a foot. 

Woburn Street, Ballardvale — From Andover Street to the 
residence of Mr. C. E. Stickney, a distance of 2660 ft.: four 
hydrants, two 6-inch gates, at a cost of $1869.80, or about 
70c a foot. 

Lupine Road — Connecting two dead-ends, a distance of 1340 
ft., 6-inch main, one hydrant, one 6-inch gate, at a cost of 
$1069.02. This job cost a little more than it should, because it 
was thought that if ever Lupine Road was fixed up, a cut should 
be made on the hill by the Cross Coal Office, therefore this pipe 
was put down at a depth of about 8 ft., so when this street is 
repaired the hill may be cut three feet without any trouble to 
the main, and improve things greatly. 

River Street, Ballardvale — 715 ft. of 6-inch main, two hy- 
drants, one 6-inch gate. This was laid across from the river, and 
for the first 400 feet a pump had to be kept in action most of the 
time on account of water. Therefore, this job went a little high, 
costing $591.67, or 83c a running foot. 

Flint's Court — a distance of 542 ft. of 4-inch C. I. main, 
cutting in tee on Elm Street line, setting gate on 4-inch line, 
$346.91. 

15 



Chandler Road — 6-inch C. I. pipe a distance of 2680 ft., four 
hydrants, one 6-inch gate, at a cost of $2030.30, or 76c a running 
foot. 

This line was practically the same length on Woburn Street, 
only one was sandy, and this line was very gravelly, accounting 
for the extra cost. 

These additions make the present plant on December 31, 1914, 
as follows: 

Total length of main pipe in service 49.64 miles 

Number of Hydrants 364 

Number of Public Buildings 14 

Number of Fountains 8 

Number of Standpipes 10 

Number of Faucets at Parks 4 

Number of Private Hydrants 32 

SERVICE PIPES 

During the year there were received 56 applications for new 
service-pipes, and there were laid 52. The number of feet laid 
by the Town from the mains to street line was 1126, and by the 
property owners 3168, all of which has been paid for. This year 
there have been two discontinued and three relaid, making a 
total on December 31, 1914, of 627 cement-lined pipes, and 
740 lead-lined; 38 of all other kinds, including solid lead, tarred, 
etc., making 1405 in number, or 111,294 ft. in length. 

METERS 

There have been set during the year 1914, 49 new meters, 
making a total of 1195 now in use. I would recommend meters 
be put where possible on all services now in use. 

PUMPING PLANTS 

The High Service Station has passed one more year to its 
record, making six years this -plant has run now without one 
cent of expense to machinery. This plant has run on an average 
of about 22 hours each week since it was started Nov. 8, 1908. 

16 



Haggett's Pond Station, where all water has to be first pumped, 
has seen a few changes. The Oil Engine has been overhauled, 
a new main bearing put in, and several small repairs on the 
Steam Plant. But this year a thorough overhauling will be 
done on the Steam Plant. The engineer's house has been painted, 
also some repairs on the coal pocket were necessary. The ex- 
pense of pumping this year was practically the same as last year, 
or a little less, while there was a little more water pumped. 

The pond has been the lowest this year that it has been since 
the town started taking water, I am told by the engineer who 
has been there, it going this year about 30 inches below high- 
water mark, while usually in the summer it ranges from 15 to 18 
inches, making it surely 12 inches lower this year than ever 
before. The edges around the pond from Campiori's camp to 
Chase's were all cleaned up this fall and a great amount of matter 
collected. The pumping this year was 365 days. The Oil 
Engine was used 123 days; the Steam Pump 242 days. The 
number of hours worked by engines was 3457 hours, 19 minutes, 
or a daily average of 9 hours, 47 minutes. This may seem small 
to a great many for two engineers; but there is the starting up 
in the morning and the shutting down and cleaning up in the 
afternoon that has to be done besides this 9 hours and 47 min- 
utes, or in other words, each man has about a day's work of some 
kind or other. Then there is a day off out of each week: we can, 
according to law, only work the engineers eight hours a day, 
six days a week. 

Number of gallons pumped by oil, 68,806,417; number of gal- 
lons pumped by steam, 166,167,134; total, 234,973,551 gallons, 
or a daily average of 643,764 gallons. The new vacuum pump 
spoken of last year for this station has been purchased and put 
in operation. The rest of the machinery and buildings are in 
very good condition, with the looking over of the Deane Pump 
spoken of above. 

The water rates will show a falling off this year on account of 
our books closing on December 31st, about ten days before they 
have in the past. (The Treasurer's Report will show amount 
of water rates due January 1st. All bills back of this quarter 
are paid). 

17 



GENERAL REPORT 

The works are in a very good condition, and the hydrants will 
all be painted this spring, as well as the water fountains. The 
shop on Lewis Street has been painted this fall, but no money 
was spent on the barn as it was not thought advisable. It has 
to be shingled and new sills and floor put in if it is still to be 
used. But now that we have added more horses to the depart- 
ment, I hope a barn may be built large enough for both. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

This past year there have been 18 applications for sewers 
received, all accepted and laid, making a total of 655 house 
connections. 

During the year both sludge beds have been dug up and the 
pipes cleaned out and relaid, making a great deal of difference 
in the working of these beds. Mr. Wright of the State Board 
of Health has visited us at different times this year, and he made 
a report to me that the beds were never in as good condition 
as they are at the present time. We have visited the different 
beds and broken the ice, and find they are working just the same 
as in summer. There has also been a great cleaning up of the 
banks from the sludge beds clear up to the settling-tank, and 
other places have seen a great change under the direction of 
your Superintendent and other new caretaker you appointed 
in April. But with all improvements on the beds that have 
been laid over and are now working so well, the State Board of 
Health has ordered additional beds built as quickly as possible 
to take care of the trouble we almost always have in the spring. 
This will mean that we must at once in the spring start on two 
additional beds. These will be built from money of our last 
Bond issue, as it is construction work. Most of the material for 
filling, and sand and gravel for the beds may be obtained within 
500 feet of where the beds will be built; the only stock to be 
purchased or teamed any distance will be the Akron Pipe, and 
crushed stone for the joints. These we will have in our own 
department. The Sewer Department should have a little more 
money the coming year, and therefore I recommend that an ap- 
propriation of $1800.00 be asked for. 

FRANK L. COLE, Supt. 
18 



RECEIPTS 



BILLS 



Mainte- 
nance 



Service 
Pipe 



Pipe 
Distribu- 
tion 



Total 



Various Parties, service pipes and meters 
Repairs on pipe and meters .... 

Off and on 

Tyer Rubber Co., supplies . 

Smith & Dove Co., supplies . . . . 

Ballard Vale Mills, supplies .... 

Buchan & McNally 

George W. Spickler, oil 

A. V. I. S., labor 

Board of Health 

Sale of junk 



$204 07 

35 00 

24 80 

31 46 

8 10 

2 38 
6 42 



$1964 94 

$ 92 08 



2 80 

4 71 

25 56 



Totals $312 23 $2090 09 



$ 10 25 



9 90 
14 47 



$34 62 



1964 94 

306 40 

35 00 

24 80 
34 26 
12 81 

25 56 
2 38 
6 42 
9 90 

14 47 



Water Rates 



Credits paid Town Treasurer 

Water Rates $19614 00 

Pipe Out 2436 94 



$22050 94 



$ 2436 94 
19614 00 

$22050 94 



$22050 94 



Approved, W. H. COLEMAN ) 

J. S. ROBERTSON \ Auditors 
N. G. GLEASON 



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SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

WATER DEPARTMENT 





Summary 




Net Cost 


Total Cost 


Designation 


Approved 


Credits 


for 


of 




Bills 




1914 


Construction 


Office Fixtures .... 








561 75 


Telemeters 








1311 63 










184 77 










583 65 


Pipe Distribution .... 


8814 59 


34 62 


8779 97 


245497 27 


Service Pipe 


3566 17 


2090 09 


1476 08 


22198 16 


Water and Land Damages 








6687 23 










1309 46 










16985 82 


Coal Shed 








806 97 


Grading Land 








1739 12 


Workshop 








1271 88 


Building Pumping Station 








9610 14 


Pumping Plants .... 






l 


44401 83 


Construction Expenses 








9406 21 


Tools . . . . 


136 35 




136 35 


3091 83 


Maintenance 


10306 80 312 23 


9994 57 




Totals 


$22823 91 S2436 94 


$20386 97 


S365647 72 



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SUPERINTENDENT OF HIGHWAYS 

AND PARKS 



To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the Second Annual Report 
of the Highway and Park Department, for the year ending 
December 31, 1914. 

I hardly know what to say about the Highway Department; 
as a matter of fact, it is a pretty hard proposition to handle for 
any man, as there are so many things that should be done, and 
one has so little to do with. I started on April 27th as Superin- 
tendent of your Board, after thinking the matter over a very 
short time. But I decided to accept your contract for ten 
months, and on the acceptance of this I made up my mind that 
I would work hard, and make as good a showing as I possibly 
could; and that has been my motive ever since starting. And 
I want to say here, I wish to thank all members of the Board for 
their kindness and help which they have shown me; also the 
taxpayers who have tried to assist me and help whenever they 
could. I found no difficulty in getting help for this Department, 
in fact, more than was needed reported, all being citizens of 
Andover and most of them having a good knowledge of what 
should be done; what they needed and most wanted was some- 
body to tell them. During the year 1914 they have done very 
well when one considers that with all the work done this summer 
there have never been over fourteen laborers on the payroll any 
one week. The teams I have had no trouble with this summer, 
all working in harmony, and trying to make things come out 
right; the drivers, or at least most of them, have helped wherever 
necessary. And still these teams did just as much as they 
always have done. On account of the number of miles I had 
to cover, having all departments to look over, the automobile 
you purchased for me I have driven about 5000 miles. This not 
only allowed me to cover the ground two or three times a day, 
where if I had to drive a horse I would have covered some of it 
only once, but it allowed me to be on the different jobs about 

25 



six working hours each day. This car was kept at the garage 
and has cost for the 5000 miles it has been driven, $222.00, or 
about 4^c a mile; this includes the storage, also three new 
shoes. This cost is without depreciation. 

On account of the large number of miles in the Highway 
Department, it has been and always will be, impossible for the 
Superintendent to do work everywhere in the same year. But 
I assure you I will try and attend to the worst places I see first; 
and of course I am always willing, and want my attention called 
to anyplace the taxpayers, or your Board have seen that possibly 
I may overlook. This year is my first as a Street Superintendent. 
I think I have learned some things, and am willing and want 
to learn more, so as to be a benefit to the town. 

I would say that the work this summer has been on a motive 
of branching out; that is, make a start from a point, and work 
from that. My start was Main Street. Somebody may say, 
well, Main Street has had enough. It should have enough, 
because it is the most traveled street in town and the hardest 
to keep in repair, especially from the Square to Chapel Avenue, 
because it is so narrow most every vehicle travels in the same 
spot. From Stimson Bridge to And over Square was also made 
new; this was a tarvia-bound road. Park Street was the next, 
and here we had drains to put in, culverts to take out and pipe 
new, catchbasins to build, and after these were completed we 
started from Whittier Street and went to the crossing on Main 
street with a tarvia-bound road, the cost of which will be shown 
in a table further on. Essex Street, from the railroad crossing to 
the Square was also done with a one-coat job of tarvia; a blind 
drain from Smith & Manning's to the brook, about 3 feet by 
3 feet 6 inches, was built, which I am in hopes will keep this 
street dry in the future. The best test will be when the frost 
comes out in the spring. Harding Street from the bridge to 
High Street, was also .treated with a one-coat job of tarvia. 
This one-coat job means No. 1 stone rolled and tarvia put on 
only once. The usual way is No. 1 stone, a coat of tarvia, then 
throw on No. 2, roll well, then a coat of tarvia again and cover 
with pea stone. This was not done on Essex or Harding Streets, 
because it was late and I was afraid of the slipping, where now, 

26 



when spring comes, the road will be rough enough to make a 
good surface, and I don't think it will be slippery with what I 
use. 

The material which was removed from the east side of Main 
Street was carted, and used from Bartlet Street to the top of 
the hill, by the residence of Mr. Jerry Leary on Morton Street, 
making a great improvement on this street. This year the re- 
maining part of Morton Street should be rebuilt, as well as a 
drain between Bartlet Street and Main Street. 

The material which was taken from Essex Street was carted 
to Abbott Village on Shawsheen Road to Cuba Street, also on 
Central Street from School to Chestnut Street; and the material 
that was not fit for the top of a road was removed to Lupine 
Road for a bottom, which I covered with ashes, making" a fill 
over the brook of about fifteen inches. There has also been ashes 
placed on Poor Street, between Main and Corbett Streets which 
were wet and well rolled. Ashes have been placed in several 
places around town, and on Hidden Road from Main Street to 
the barn of Daniel Donovan. These make a very good road 
where the travel is light. There are many other places where 
gravel has been placed for a number of feet also. I will give a 
table later on showing different streets and amount of money 
spent on same since April 27th. From January 1st to April 27th 
I find no records showing where the money was spent, only in 
a lump sum every month. 

The road-scraping was stopped early this year on account of 
the dryness, it being very dusty in the outside districts. The 
River Road is being repaired in some of the worst places by 
Mr. Dodge of Hood's Farm, between the Tewkesbury line and 
Mr. Charles Newton's. This was intended to be all done this 
year, but the ground froze so early, it will now have to wait 
until spring. 

RESURFACING 

This resurfacing cost about 63^c per sq. yd, that covering 
patching, sand, labor, etc.; when resurfacing alone needs to be 
done 5%c to 6c is enough. This resurfacing will not require 
as much in the future, that is, probably in two years, after these 
roads have had about two applications of Tarvia B, according 

27 



to other towns where I have inquired ; they can then be allowed 
to skip two or three years. In some cases they have gone five 
years without even repairs of any kind. A table will show the 
streets resurfaced and square yards in each street, further on. 
When the resurfacing is going on, if the teams would only use 
a side street for twenty-four hours, it would allow the Tarvia B 
to soak in evenly, otherwise the wheels make ruts, even taking 
the tarvia and sand off the street, and most always making 
a mess of wagons as well as the roads. 

OILING AND SPRINKLING 

During the summer there was spent for oil, $1142.30; also the 
watering-cart, $808.64, making $1950.94 in all. There was 
received by the Tax Collector, $1466.03, making $484.91 more 
cost than was received by the Town. Now no private business 
concern can afford to lose that amount on such a small invest- 
ment, and why should the Town. I would recommend that the 
price of sprinkling, oiling, or Tarvia B, as these are all used as 
a dust layer, be increased one cent a foot, then we could get out 
of this trouble whole. 

PAVING 

I would recommend that the Square be paved. There are 
2081 square yards in the Square; 263 of this would be paid for 
by the Street Railway, making 1818 square yards for the Town. 
With this paving would be the renewal of the Musgrove Block, 
Public Library, Campion Block, and Water Fountain; service 
pipes and a new drain from corner of Elm Street to the pipe 
running to the brook. These pipes should be put in new, so 
that there would be no chance of digging up the work for years 
to come. This would cost, I believe, about $6000.00, covering 
all, or about $2500.00 for one side this year and $3500.00 next 
year; then in two years we would have the Square all com- 
pleted. I think this should be an extra appropriation, as the 
cost of paving is so much. 

SIDEWALKS 

In this line of work there has been as much done as possible 
with the amount of money available. There has been work 
done on several streets, with ashes and dust. On this work 

28 






alone I have spent about $500.00, while on the new work of tar 
concrete there has been spent $1164.93. This new work, as 
well as the resurfacing of many old streets, was done by con- 
tract by W. F. Duffee of Haverhill. There were 788.6 sq. yds. 
of new work done, and 2163 sq. yds. of resurfacing; there was 
also $174.14 credit under the Betterment Act. I would recom- 
mend $2000.00 this year for sidewalks, S500 to be spent on the 
completing of the Haverhill Street sidewalk started in the fall 
of 1914. 

SURFACE DRAINAGE 

Drains and catchbasins have been laid and built on High 
Street, Harding Street, Maple Avenue, Park Street, Essex 
Street, and Haverhill Street. This coming year should see 
catchbasins and drains on several more streets, as this is a condi- 
tion that must be looked after before a new street is started or 
constructed. The cost of cleaning out these catchbasins will 
of course increase, and this will mean less work on highways 
each year, because the greater the cost of maintenance the 
less we have for construction or new work. 

DIRT OR GRAVEL ROADS 

There has been a great deal of repairing done, but, I am sorry 
to say, when spring comes I am afraid there will be some places 
just as bad as before they were patched. The Ballard vale roads 
have seen one more year of good work, looked after by Mr. 
Haggerty, who has for a long time looked after this district. 
I shall farther on make a report of work done by Mr. Haggerty 
and cost of same. 

GUTTERS 

Cleaning and repairing gutters is a very large expense and 
there should be more paved gutters, or have the new roads we 
are constructing built with tarvia too, and including all gutters. 
High Street from the new catchbasin to Harding Street should 
have new gutters this year, as well as Walnut Avenue from 
where they now are clear to the top of the hill, as this is a very 
bad place in a storm. 

29 



EXPENDITURES FOR REPAIRS AND NEW WORK 

from April 27 to December 31, 1914 



Argilla Road 

Bartlet 

Ballardvale Road 

Beacon 

Bancroft Road 

At Crusher 

Chandler Road 

Chestnut 

Corbett 

Cross 

Central 

Elm 

Essex 

Florence 

High 

Haverhill 

Harding 

Highland Road 

Hidden Road 

Holt 

Lowell 

Locke 

Love joy Road 

Lewis 

Maple Avenue 

Morton 

North Main 

Main 

Orchard 

Phillips 

At Pit 

Punchard Avenue 

Porter Road 

Park 

Pearson 

Poor 

Red Spring Road 

River Road 

Salem 

Sunset Rock Road 

Shawsheen Road 

Summer 

School 

Andover Square 

Stevens 

Union 

Whittier 

Wildwood Road 

Wolcott Avenue 

Walnut Avenue 



Scraping and Gravel 
Sidewalks, Gutters, Tarvia 
Scraping and Gravel 
Scraping, Gravel, Cleaning 
Catchbasins and Covers 
Constructing and putting roof over same 
Gravel 

Sidewalks, Gutters, Tarvia 
Repairing washout 
Taking out stone, burning brush 
Gutters, Gravel, Steam Roller 
Gutters, Sidewalks, Culverts, filling holes 
Gutters, Drains, Stone for Drain, new work 
Gutters, Cleaning 

Gutters, Drains, Catchbasins, Tarvia 
Sidewalks, scraping and filling 
Curbing, Drains, Sidewalk, new work 
Sidewalk Gutters, lowering grade 
Ashes, Steam Roller 
Filling holes 

Catchbasin, filling holes, raking stones 
Gutters, Tarvia 
Scraping 
Gutter Work 
Gutters, Drain, Gravel 
Gutters, Gravel, from Bartlet to hill 
Including from river to Square 
From Square to Porter Road, including new 
road, patching, and blanketing with Tarvia 
Removing stone, filling holes 
Gutters, Filling 
Screening Gravel 

Gutters, Sidewalk, Tarvia and Sand 
Tarvia and Sand, Gutters 
New Road 

Grading, General Work 
Ashes and Roller, Main to Corbett 
Cleaning 

Tarvia, Patching, Raking Stone 
Patching, Gutters, Tarvia and Sand 
Scraping, Culvert Work, Filling 
Abbott Village, to West Church 
Sidewalks, Filling, Gutters, Culverts 
Gutters, Filling Holes 
Filling 
Filling 

Tarvia and Sand 
Gutters, Sidewalks, Filling Holes 
Scraping, Cleaning, Ashes, Roller 
Sidewalks, Scraping, Cleaning 
Sidewalks, Scraping, Cleaning 

30 



; 77 


89 


47 


35 


97 


18 


54 


52 


15 


44 


50 


58 


78 


95 


172 


77 


3 


19 


29 


10 


164 


55 


456 


69 


2099 


08 


12 


57 


433 


78 


196 


56 


898 


29 


217 


56 


106 


00 


8 


76 


68 37 


64 


89 


25 


58 


7 


19 


447 


95 


467 


75 


4047 


17 


2919 


52 


10 


19 


29 


01 


123 


68 


61 


81 


558 


42 


3992 


29 


78 


85 


88 


86 


19 


48 


536 


16 


394 


76 


76 


99 


380 


55 


108 


70 


36 


40 


7 


50 


105 


24 


133 


29 


70 37 


168 


37 


74 


13 


3 


00 



NEW WORK DONE IN 1914 



Main Street 

Morton 

North Main 

Park 

Essex 

Shawsheen Road 

Harding 

Park, 

Essex 

High 

Harding 

Maple Avenue 

Harding 



3314 sq. yds. of Tarvia-bound Road 



Water-bound 
Tarvia-bound 



3267 " " 
7710 " " 
3840 " " " 
3220 " " " 

Water bound 
878 " " " Tarvia-bound " 
Drain, Catchbasins, Covers, etc. 
Drain, Stone and Labor 
Drain, Catchbasins, Pipe (380 ft. 10"-12") 
Drain, 196 ft. 15" Pipe, and Labor 
Drain, 874 ft. 12" Pipe, 1 Catchbasin 
Curbing, Freight, Labor setting 



COST 

2253 17 

514 50 

4047 17 

2814 14 

1948 01 

139 32 

543 05 

475 02 

127 00 

285 68 

112 54 

342 37 

285 87 



RESURFACING WITH TARVIA B AND SAND 



6180 sq. 
11700 
4980 
8590 
1040 
750 
2950 
3360 
7040 
1070 
1060 
3300 



Elm Street 




3090 feet 


Main 




5460 * 




Salem 




2800 ' 




Porter Road 




4320 ' 




Locke Street 




550 ' 




Punchard Avenue 


420 ' 




High Street 




1660 ' 




Bartlet 




1625 ' 




Lowell Road 




7920 ' 




Chestnut 




420 ' 




Salem 




570 ' 




Main (new road) 


2500 ■ 





yds. 



52020 sq. yds. 



31 



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BALLARDVALE REPORT 

Repaired road, including stoning and graveling, from the 
Kimball place on Andover Street, 180 ft. south. 

Removed all stones from streets, cleaned out all catchbasins 
and gutters about the village. 

Used road scraper and made all necessary repairs after scraping 
on all the following streets : From Allicon place to the Wilming- 
ton line on Woburn Street; Woburn Street down Andover 
Street to High Street, including High Street to the church; from 
residence of Thomas Stott on River Street to the Wilmington 
line; from Perry place to Dascomb Road; from Andover Street 
up Dascomb Road to the Tewksbury line; from Pillsbury 
corner, Osgood Street, Andover Street where needed. Repaired 
sidewalk on the east side of Andover Street and built a cement 
curbing on the same. This wall was also taken down and built 
new by Mr. John McCarthy, by contract. Repairs were made 
on Abbot Street from Old Railroad to Porter Road. 

A few repairs on the Ballardvale Playstead were made for the 
Fourth of July celebration. One car of dust was put on late this 
fall, and many repairs and patchings too small to mention 
but which had to be attended to were also done. The amount 
spent for this work, including team, man, and gravel was $1994.98 
for the Ballardvale District. Not including snow. 

A catchbasin and some piping will have to be put in this year 
to take care of the water that crosses by Joseph Scott's store. 
There is need of about two cars more of dust for sidewalks in 
Ballardvale, and I believe oil would save, and help keep the 
cost of maintenance down if used on these gravel roads. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

A gutter on High Street from residence of George Saunders 
to Harding Street, across street from Miss Laura Spence's to 
catchbasin on Walnut Avenue. 

Necessary catchbasins and paved gutters on Walnut Avenue. 

Morton Street, tarvia-bound road and necessary drain, etc., 
from Bartlet Street to Main Street; from Main to School Streets. 

Bartlet Street, from residence of B. M. Allen to Chapel Avenue, 
a new construction complete, drain, etc. 

35 



Elm Street, from residence of H. M. Eames to Andover 
Square, a tarvia-bound road. 

Chestnut Street, between Main and Central Streets, tarvia- 
bound road. 

Central Street, from Essex Street to J. J. Abbott's — or part 
this year and finish next — a tarvia-bound road. 

That the street sprinkling assessment be increased sufficiently 
to cover the cost of the work. 

Set curbing on all corners of streets wherever new work is 
constructed and a great number of other places where needed. 

That the Square, or at least one-half of same, be paved this 
year, and a separate appropriation be asked for same. 

That the Sidewalk appropriation be increased $500 and that 
this amount be spent, or as much as needed, for the completion 
of the Haverhill Street sidewalk already started. 

A shed must be built, and a barn we need, as we now have no 
place to store our snow plough, carts, sleds, water-wagons, and 
many other things. The barn should be connected with the 
shed, as the barn we now have is not large enough for the keep- 
ing of three horses, and furthermore the floor is all gone. We 
would have to spend a good deal of money for repairs if left as 
it is, so I would recommend that a special article be inserted 
in the Warrant for $1500 for a shed and building we need on 
our land to care for and store what we have. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation, March, 1914 

Highway Department 
Receipts from St. R. R. Franchise Tax 
Receipts from St. R. R. Excise Tax 
Receipts from Street Sprinkling 
Credits (various accounts) 



Total Receipts 

36 



$25000 00 


2560 


37 


2049 


41 


1466 


03 


723 


84 


$31799 65 



Expenditures as follows: 



Maintenance Highway 

Construction (new work) 

Tools 

Bridges 

Sprinkling with Carts 


$17113 08 

13633 55 

221 37 

10 00 

808 64 




Total Expenditure 
Balance Dec. 31, 1914 


$31786 64 
13 01 




Total Receipts 

Appropriation for Sidewalks 
Credits 

Expenditures 
Balance 


S1648 41 
25 73 


$31799 65 

$1500 00 
174 14 



$1674 14 $1674 14 



Snow 



Appropriation for Snow, 

Expenditure, 
Overdraft. 



S2684 37 



$2500 00 



184 37 





$2684 37 


$2684 37 


Park Department appropriation, 
Boulders, 




$1500 00 
200 00 


Expended on Park, 
Expended on Boulders, 


$1477 17 
200 00 




Balance, December 31, 1914, 


$1677 17 

22 S3 


• 



$1700 00 $1700 00 



37 



OILING STREETS 



Streets 


Length 


Width 


Sq. Yds. 




Elm St. . 


1713 


43 


6391 




Maple Ave. 


670 


15 


1120 




Andover Square 






2000 




Car Tracks . 


3305 


15 


5510 




School St. 


2535 


21 


5915 




Central . 


2903 


21 


6774 




Chapel Ave. 


670 


18 


1340 




Phillips St. . . 


223 


15 


372 




Highland Rd. . 


300 


8 


277 




Main St. 


280 


8 


248 




Andover St., B. V. 


580 


16 


1030 




Phillips Academy . 


1646 


9 


1650 


Private 


Town House, Barnard St. 






1400 




Abbot St. . . 


950 


16-33 


2650 




Phillips St., Torr's Cor. 


425 


24 


1130 




Essex St. 


1070 


25 


3000 




Around Depot 


300-100 


30-120 


2340 




Chestnut St 


1770 


24-27 


5000 




Whittier St 


425 


1 24 


1140 




Main St. 


360 


8 


320 




Park St. 


586 


24 


1570 




Post Office Ave. 








Private 



Cost of Above Oiling 
Cost of Watering . 



Total Cost 

Receipts from Tax Collector 

Balance Cost Town 



S1142 30 
808 64 

$1950 94 
1466 03 

484 91 



PARKS AND PLAYSTEADS 

I would say that when taking up the position of Superintendent 
I found David Leslie and James Abercrombie at work, they 
being hired by the Board of Public Works. Work was started 
by these two men on April 27th, and both continued until 
June 13th, when Mr. Abercrombie was laid off for the rest of 
the summer. From that date Mr. Leslie continued until Novem- 
ber 7th as caretaker of the Park and Playstead as well, his time 
being distributed between both as condition required. 

The wall on both sides of the brook has been continued to 
the entrance of the pond. This work was done by John Mc- 
Carthy, he digging down a foot below the present bed of the 
brook and filling in with a cement base, and on this a good wall 
was built. 

38 



During the summer J. E. Pitman built a roof over the grand- 
Stand on the Playstead. This was stained by C. E. Donovan. 
After this was built, the Superintendent had W. J. Doherty put 
in a small room under the stand to be used as a dressing-room. 
And I would like to say that since the building of this in the late 
summer the lock has been broken at two different times. 

New seats were purchased by the Board and placed on the 
Park, and in the Square at the junction of Main and High Streets. 

The following table will show the amount of money spent and 
who received same. 

EXPENDITURES 



Names 




John McCarthy, wall .... 

David Leslie, labor 

James Abercrombie 

W. I. Morse, tools and seats 
D. Donovan & Son, painting . 

John E. Pitman 

A. V. I. S., Boulders .... 
William J. Doherty, locker . 

J. Harry Playdon 

Franklin Forestry Co 

Frank L. Cole 

W. H. Coleman & Co 

Winchester Rock Co 

Ira Buxton 

Charles P. Rea, teaming 
T. F. Morrissey, teaming 
Charles Baker, teaming 
Anderson & Bowman .... 

Fred Adams, labor 

Hardy & Cole 

Flint Symonds, labor .... 
Hugh Callahan, labor .... 

Burt Wheeler, team 

John Ronan, labor . . . 

George Abbott, Playstead (B. V.) 
Leon. York, Playstead (B. V.) . 
Patrick Conway, Playstead (B. V.) 



500 00 
327 81 

75 93 
74 84 
42 00 

165 00 

200 00 

30 00 

25 00 

24 00 

76 92 

25 00 
20 15 

9 15 

6 55 

10 94 

16 41 

35 

4 00 

1 30 
16 32 

50 

2 50 
63 

6 56 
8 75 
6 56 



Balance 


$1677 17 

22 83 






$1700 00 








$1700 00 



39 



Appropriation, March, 1914, for Park Department, $1700.00, 
$200.00 of which to be spent on The Boulders. 

I would recommend an appropriation of $1500.00 be asked 
for in 1915, $150.00 to be spent by the A. V. I. S., under the 
direction of the Board of Public Works. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK L. COLE, SupL 



40 



TOWN OK ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1915 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1916 



CONTENTS 



Almshouse Expenses, 59 

Personal Property at, 62 

Relief out of, 63 

Rep lirs on, 62 
Superintendent's Rep >rt, 64 

Aiding Mothers, 63 

Animal Inspector, 80 

Appropriations, 1915, 15 

Art Gallery, 130 

Assessors' Report, 65 

Assets, 87 

Auditors' Report 95 

Board of Health, 52 

Board of Public Works, Appendix 

Sewer Maintenance, 52 

Sewer Sinking Funds, 52 

Water Maintenance, 51 

Water Construction, 51 

Water Sinking]Funds, 51 

Bonds, Redmption of. 50 

Brush Fires 79 

Collector's Account, 84 

Cornell Fund, 83 

County Tax, 44 

Dog Tax, 45 

Dump, care of. 47 
Fire Department, 38, 66 

Fire Alarm Boxes, 40 

Finance Committee, 96 

G. A. R. Post, 99, 45 

Hay Scales, 46 

High School Plans, 31 

Industrial School, 29 

Insurance, 38 



Interest on Notes and Funds, 48 

Liabilities, 87 

Librarian's Report, 110 

Memorial Day, 45 

Memorial Hall, 46, 103 

Miscellaneous, 35 

Moth Superintendent's Report 76 

Moth Suppression, 77 

Notes Given, 47 

Notes Paid, 47 

Overseers of the Poor, 58 

Police, 41, 68 

Printing and Stationery, 43 

Punchard Free School, Report 

of Trustees, 103 

Schedule of Town Property, 71 

Schoolhouses, . 30 

Schools, 24 

School Books and Supplies, 32 

Selectmen's Report, 24 

Soldiers' Relief, 62 

Spring Grove Cemetery, 
Report, 

State Aid, 63 

State Tax, 44 

Street Lighting, 37 

Summary Collector's Cash Acct., 86 

Town House . 42 

Town Meetings, 7 

Town Officers, 4, 34 

Town Warrant, 99 

Treasurer's Account, 87 

Tree Warden, 35 

Report, 75 



45, 81 

82 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1915 



Selectmen, Assessors and Overseers of the Poor 

HARRY M. EAMES, Chairman Term expires 1917 

CHARLES BOWMAN " " 1918 

WALTER S. DONALD, Secretary " " 1916 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
JOHN W. BELL 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

School Committee 

ALFRED E. STEARNS 
GEORGE A. CHRISTIE 
LILIAN BREWSTER 
BARTLETT H. HAYES 
HENRY A. BODWELL 
JOHN C. ANGUS 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
FREDERIC G. MOORE 
PHILIP F. RIPLEY 

Superintendent of Schools 
J. FRANCIS ALLISON 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 

THOMAS E. RHODES Term expires 1917 

WILLIS B. HODGKINS " " 1918 

ANDREW McTERNEN " " 1918 

LEWIS T. HARDY " " 1916 

BARNETT ROGERS " " 1916 



?rrr 


i expires 


1917 


u 


<< 


1917 


a 


u 


1917 


a 


a 


1918 


it 


ti 


1918 


It 


a 


1918 


it 


n 


1916 


<< 


<< 


1916 


<< 


it 


1916 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 

FRANK L. COLE 



Engineers of Fire Department 
CHARLES S. BUCHAN, Chief WALTER I. MORSE, Clerk 

ALLAN SIMPSON 



Board of Health 

BANCROFT T. HAYNES 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. 



Term expires 1917 
1918 
1916 



<< 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Constables 
GEORGE W. MEARS 
FRANK M. SMITH 
WILLIAM L. FRYE 
CHESTER H. LAWRENCE 



Term expires 1916 
1916 
1916 
1916 



n 



<< 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

CHARLES C. CARPENTER Term expires 1921 

GEORGE F. SMITH " " 1922 

ALFRED E. STEARNS " " 1916 

BURTON S. FLAGG " " 1917 

E. KENDALL JENKINS " " 1918 

JOHN ALDEN " "" 1919 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL " " 1920 



Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1916 

SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL HARRY H. NOYES 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY M. EAMES 

FRANK T. CARLTON 

5 



Auditors 

DAVID R. LAWSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

NESBIT G. GLEASON 

Trustees of Cornell Fund 

JOHN C. ANGUS Term expires 1917 

ALLAN SIMPSON " " 1916 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER " " 1918 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
JOHN H. PLAYDON 

Tree Warden 
JOHN H. PLAYDON 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 

Registrars of Voters 

GEORGE W. FOSTER JOHN F. HURLEY 
PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Annual Town Meeting, March 1 , 1915 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ESSEX, SS.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the first day of March, 1915, at 
6 o'clock a.m., to act on the following Articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three mem- 
bers of the School Committee for three years, two members of 
the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the 
Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for 
one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Me- 
morial Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one 
year, one Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, Pound Keeper, 
Fence Viewers, and any other officers the town may determine 
to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 



Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, 
Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 
Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, 
Parks and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public 
Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Acts of 1912, Redemption 
of Water Bonds and Andover Loan Bonds, Schools, School 
Houses, School Books and Supplies, Industrial School, Sewer 
Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Snow, Soldiers' Relief, 
Spring Grove Cemetery, Sidewalks, State Aid, Street Lighting, 
Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, Moth Department, 
Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking Funds, and other 
town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$500 for repairs on the old schoolhouse at Ballard Vale, on recom- 
mendation of the Selectmen. 

Article 5. — To see what action the town will take in regard 
to the removal of the Brick Pumping Station on Bancroft Road 
and the installation of a pumping station to take its place in a 
vault made for the purpose, said pumping station to be run 
by electricity instead of oil, and the appropriation of a sufficient 
sum of money for this purpose, on petition of Fred M. Temple 
and others. 

Article 6. — To hear the report of the School Committee on 
High School plans, and to see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred thousand ($100,000) dollars 
for the purpose of building and equipping a new high school 
building, and making the necessary changes in the Central 
Heating Plant, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will vote to extend the sewerage 
system to Abbott and Marland Villages, and appropriate a sum 
of money therefor, on petition of Daniel Hart and others. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will appropriate money for a 
fire alarm box to be located near the residence of John E. Hutche- 
son on Summer Street, on petition of John J. Cady and others. 

8 



Article 9. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
SI 500 to erect a barn and shed for the purpose of housing the 
horses, carts, plows, wagons, watering carts, and other properties 
under the care of the Board of Public Works, on petition of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
S200 to be spent for band concerts, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will vote to extend the water 
system from its present terminal at the residence of Horace E. 
Dyer on Rocky Hill Road, to the residence of Samuel Thomes, 
a distance of about 1400 feet, on petition of Samuel Thomes and 
others. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will vote to assume the care 
of the Rogers Brook, so-called, from Main Street to Morton 
Street, and to see what sum of money the town will appropriate 
to pay the cost of the same, to provide adequate drainage, on 
petition of W. E. Lombard and others. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will provide for the removal 
of dump and ashes, under the care of the Board of Public Works, 
and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of the 
Andover Village Improvement Society. 

Article 14. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year. 

Article 15. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 16. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 17. — To act upon the Report of the Town Officers. 

Article 18. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

9 



Article 19. — To determine what disposition shall be made 
of unexpended appropriations. 

Article 20. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock a.m., and may be closed at 
2 o'clock p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least, before the 
time of said meeting, as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this thirteenth day of February, 
A.D. 1915. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of Andover 



Andover, March 1, 1915 

Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said town to meet at the time and place and for 
the purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same on the Town House, on each school- 
house, and in no less than five other public places where bills 
and notices are usually posted, and by publication in the Andover 
Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and published 
seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 



10 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH I, 1915 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House 
in said Andover on Monday, the first day of March, 1915, at 
six o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the requirements of 
the foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided, 
and after reading a part of the warrant it was 

Voted, To dispense with the further reading of the warrant. 

Voted, To take up Articles 1 and 2 together. 

Voted, That the polls be closed at 2 o'clock p.m. 

Took up Articles 1 and 2 and proceeded to vote for Town 
Officers and on the License Question by the Australian ballot 
system. 

The ballot box was found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at 6 o'clock a.m., and closed at 2 o'clock p.m., 
as voted. The total number of ballots cast was 1109, twenty- 
seven (27) of which were female ballots for School Committee 
only. 

The result of the balloting was as follows: — 

Moderator — One year: 

Alfred L. Ripley 829 

Scattering 5 

Blanks 248 

Town Clerk — One year: 

George A. Higgins 878 

Scattering 6 

Blanks 198 

Town Treasurer — One year: 

George A. Higgins 846 

Scattering 3 

Blanks 233 

11 



Selectman — Three years: 

William A. Allen 205 

Charles Bowman 619 

John H. Clinton 169 

Edgar M. Earley 51 

Blanks 38 

Assessor — Three years: 

William A. Allen 213 

Charles Bowman 594 

John H. Clinton 169 

Edgar M. Earley 46 

Blanks 60 

Collector of Taxes— One year: 

John W. Bell 851 

Scattering 3 

Blanks 228 

School Committee — Three years: 

John C. Angus 790 

Henry A. Bodwell 780 

Bartlett H. Hayes 739 

Scattering 5 

Blanks 1013 

Board of Public Works — One year: 

Willis B. Hodgkins 696 

Andrew McTernen 756 

Scattering 2 

Blanks 710 

Board of Health — Three years: 

Franklin H. Stacey 688 

Scattering 6 

Blanks 388 

Auditors of Accounts — One year: 

Walter H. Coleman 573 

Nesbit G. Gleason 598 

12 



David R. Lawson 591 

John S. Robertson 554 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 929 

Constables — One year: 

Thomas F. Dailey 342 

Chester H. Lawrence 461 

George W. Mears 592 

James Oldroyd 234 

Frank M. Smith 667 

Scattering 3 

Blanks 947 

Trustees of Memorial Hall Library — Seven years: 

George F. Smith 784 

Scattering 2 

Blanks 296 

Tree Warden — One year: 

John H. Playdon 808 

Blanks 274 

Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of Intoxicating 
Liquors in this town? 

Yes 350 

No 580 

Blanks 152 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted on by 

ballot and the check lists were used. 



REPORT OF PRECINCT CLERK 

Polls open at 6 a.m. Ballot Box registered 0000; whole number 
of ballots received 150. Ballot Box registered 1010 at close, 
failing to work correctly. Whole number of ballots cast, 1109, 
of which 1082 were male voters and 27 female. The check lists 
tallied with the number of votes cast. Number of regular 
ballots returned, 918. Number of female ballots returned, 123. 
Polls closed at 2 p.m. 

DANIEL A. COLLINS 

Precinct Clerk 

13 



The Moderator declared — 

Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Treasurer for one year. 

Charles Bowman elected Selectman for three years. 

Charles Bowman elected Assessor for three years. 

John W. Bell elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 

John C. Angus elected School Committee for three years. 

Henry A. Bodwell elected School Committee for three years. 

Bartlett H. Hayes elected School Committee for three years. 

Willis B. Hodgkins elected Board of Public Works for three 
years. 

Andrew McTernen elected Board of Public Works for three 
years. 

Franklin H. Stacey elected Board of Health for three years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Nesbit G. Gleason elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

David R. Lawson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Chester H. Lawrence elected Constable for one year. 

George W. Mears elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

George F. Smith elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
seven years. 

John H. Playdon, elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund — Dr. William D. Walker for 
three years. 

Chose Fence Viewers for one year — James Saunders, George 
W. Mears, Raymond L. Buchan. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee — Barnett Rogers, Walter H. 
Coleman, Colver J. Stone, Charles B. Baldwin, Henry J. Gardner. 

14 



Chose Finance Committee for one year — George Abbot, 
Samuel H. Bailey, Samuel H. Boutwell, Joseph L. Burns, John 
H. Campion, Walter M. Lamont. 

Town Pound — Voted, That Town Barn and Barnyard be the 
Town Pound and that the Superintendent of the Town Farm 
be the keeper. 

Took up Article 3. 



Voted, To appropriate the following stated sums ol 


: money: 


Almshouse Expenses 


% 4200 00 


Repairs on Almshouse 


800 00 


Relief out of Almshouse 


4700 00 


Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 


500 00 


Board of Health 


1000 00 


Brush Fires 


800 00 


Fire Department 


8000 00 


New Hose 


500 00 


Hay Scales 


125 00 


Highway Department 


25000 00 


(Also amounts received from Street Sprinkling 




and Street Railway and Franchise Taxes) 




Insurance 


950 00 


Insurance under Workmen's Compensation Act 


500 00 


Interest 


13000 00 


Memorial Hall Library 


1800 00 


Memorial Day 


350 00 


Post 99, G. A. R. 


50 00 


Miscellaneous 


1700 00 


Parks and Playsteads 


1500 00 


Police 


4500 00 


Printing and Stationery 


1250 00 


Public Dump 


75 00 


Retirement of Veterans, Acts 1912 


300 00 


Redemption of Water Bonds 


11000 00 


Redemption of Andover Loan Act Bonds 


5000 00 


Amount carried forward 


$87600 00 



15 



Amount brought forward 
Schools 

Unexpended Balance for Plans 

Maintenance 

Books and Supplies 

School Houses 

Industrial School 
Sewer Department 

Maintenance 

Sinking Funds 
Snow 

Soldier's Relief 

Spring Grove Cemetery and Receipts from sale of lots 
State Aid 
Sidewalks ($250 to be spent under Betterment Act but 

if no applications are received before September 

1, it shall be at the disposal of the Board of Public 

Works) 
Street Lighting 
Town Officers 
Town House 
Tree Warden 
Moth Department 
Water Department 

Maintenance 

Construction (no part for extension) 

Sinking Funds 
Fire Alarm Box (Article 8) 
New Barn and Shed (Article 9) 
Water— Rocky Hill Road (Article 11) 

Total 
Estimated County Tax 
Estimated State Tax 



Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 4.10 p.m., To indefinitely postpone. 



37600 


00 


250 


00 


40500 


00 


2400 


00 


3600 


00 


200 


00 


1800 


00 


1000 


00 


1500 


00 


900 


00 


1000 


00 


1500 


00 



2000 


00 


6300 


00 


6500 


00 


2000 


00 


250 


00 


3250 


00 


10000 


00 


3000 


00 


750 00 


225 


00 


1500 


00 


1500 


00 


$179525 00 


14000 


00 


23000 


00 


$216525 


00 



16 



Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 4.12 p.m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 4.19 p.m., That the report of the Committee on 
High School Plans be accepted and the committee be discharged. 

On the motion that the town raise and appropriate the sum 
of one hundred thousand ($100,000) dollars for the purpose of 
building and equipping a new high school building and making 
the necessary changes in the central heating plant, it was 

Voted, at 6.19 p.m., Not to do so, the vote being Yes 199. 
No 153, which was not the required two-thirds. 

Voted, at 6.24 p.m., That further consideration and definite 
action on the question of erecting a new high school building be 
postponed until the annual town meeting in March, 1916. That 
a committee be appointed by the Moderator to consider the 
entire question with especial reference to the disposal of the 
present high school building and to the construction of a new 
high school, that this committee consist of two members of 
the School Board, one member of the Board of Trustees of 
Punchard Free School not a member of the School Board, and 
two other citizens. 

The Moderator appointed the following committee: From 
the School Committee, Henry A. Bodwell and Alfred E. Stearns; 
from the Trustees of Punchard Free School, Myron E. Gutterson; 
from the town, John N. Cole and Burton S. Flagg. 

Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 6.33 p.m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 6.35 p.m., That the sum of $225 be appropriated 
for a fire alarm box to be located near the residence of John E. 
Hutcheson on Summer Street. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 6.37 p.m., That the sum of $1500 be appropriated 
to erect a barn and shed for the purpose of housing the horses, 
carts, plows, wagons, watering-carts, and other properties under 
the care of the Board of Public Works. 

17 



Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 6.38 p.m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 11. 

Voted, at 6.45 p.m., That the town extend the water system 
from its present terminal at the residence of Horace E. Dyer 
on Rocky Hill Road, to the residence of Samuel Thomes, a 
distance of about 1400 feet, and that the sum of $1500 be ap- 
propriated therefor. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, at 6.52 p.m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 6.53 p.m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 6.54 p.m., That the pay of the firemen be $75.00 
per year. 

Took up Article 15. 

Voted, at 6.55 p.m., That the taxes be collected by the Col- 
lector, and that he receive one per cent of all moneys collected. 

Took up Article 16. 

Voted, at 6.56 p.m., That the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1915, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts 
incurred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. 

Took up Article 17. 

Voted, at 6.57 p.m., That the Report of the Town Officers be 
accepted. 

Took up Article 18. 

18 



Voted, at 6.58 p.m., To raise by taxation $125,500 and also an 
amount sufficient to meet the State and County Taxes. 

Took up Article 19. 

Voted, at 6.59 p.m., That all unexpended balances be turned 
into the treasury. 

Took up Article 20. 

Voted, at 7.00 p.m., To instruct the Selectmen to petition the 
County Commissioners to locate the bounds on North Main 
Street in the Town of Andover from Shawsheen Bridge to 
Andover Square and to especially widen that portion of the 
highway, viz: — the bridge crossing the Boston & Maine tracks 
on said street, in accordance with the provisions contained in 
Chapter 463, section 23, part one, Acts of 1906. 

Voted, at 7.01 p.m., That, whereas, the size of the Town Hall 
makes it difficult to seat the qualified voters of the town at their 
meetings, Resolved, That it is the sense of this meeting that 
admission to the floor of the hall at town meetings should be 
granted only to qualified voters, as determined by use of the 
check list. 

Voted, at 7.04 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officer's 
return on the same, also a true copy of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest, 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Town Clerk 



19 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ESSEX, SS.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town 
House, in said Andover, on Wednesday, the thirty-first day of 
March, 1915, at 7.45 o'clock p.m., to act on the following Articles: 

Article 1. — To see if the town will appoint a sum not to exceed 
$75,000 for the purpose of paying any portion of the cost of the 
extension of the sewerage system in the Town of Andover, to 
what is known as the Abbott and Marland Village section, in 
accordance with plans drawn by McClintock and Woodfall, to 
authorize the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow the same, and to assess betterments upon the estates 
benefited by the said extension, upon petition of Daniel Hart 
and others. 

Article 2. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting, as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this fifteenth day of March, A.D. 1915. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of Andover 

20 



Andover, March 31, 1915 
Essex, SS. 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said town to meet at the time and place and for 
the purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same on the Town House, on each school- 
house and in not less than five other public places where bills 
and notices are usually posted, and by publication in the Andover 
Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and published 
seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, 

Constable 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House 
in said Andover on Wednesday, the thirty-first day of March, 
1915, at 7.45 o'clock in the evening, agreeably to the require- 
ments of the foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley 
presided and read the warrant. 

Took up Article 1. 

Voted, at 10.30 p.m., That that portion of a sewerage system 
shown on plan of McClintock and Woodfall dated June 8, 1898, 
on the west side of the Shawsheen River between Central and 
Stevens Streets be adopted as a part of the sewerage system of 
the Town of Andover, twenty-five (25%) per cent of the cost 
of the same to be borne by the town and seventy-five (75%) per 
cent by the owners of estates situated within the territory 
embraced by it and benefited thereby, in accordance with the 
provision of Section 11, Chapter 386, of the Acts of 1895. That 
the town raise and appropriate the sum of seventy-five thousand 
($75,000) dollars for the purposes specified in Article No. 1, 
to wit: — 

Of paying any portion of the cost of the extension of the 
sewerage system in the Town of Andover to what is known as 
the Abbott Village and Marland Village sections in accordance 
with plans drawn by McClintock and Woodfall, and that the 

21 



Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby 
is authorized to borrow said sum and to issue therefor bonds or 
notes of the Town bearing interest at the current rate but not 
to exceed five per centum per annum, payable semi-annually, 
January 1 and July 1, said bonds or notes to be signed by the 
Treasurer of the Town, and countersigned by a majority of the 
Selectmen and Board of Public Works, and to be under the seal 
of the Town. They shall bear upon their face the words " Ando- 
ver Sewer Loan of 1915 ", and the statement that they are exempt 
from taxation in Massachusetts. They shall be dated July 1, 
A.D. 1915, and shall be issued in numbered series and shall be 
payable in accordance with the provisions of Section 8, Chapter 
386 of the Acts of 1895, so that the whole loan shall be paid in 
not more than thirty years from the date of the first bond or 
note issued or at such earlier periods as the Treasurer and 
Selectmen may determine. Principal and interest of said bonds 
shall be payable in lawful money of the United States at such 
bank or trust company as the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, shall elect. Said securities may be sold by said 
Treasurer at public or private sale or pledged at not less than 
their par value for money borrowed for the purposes of this act. 
Said bonds shall be certified by a bank or trust company to be 
selected by the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen. 
Yeas 251; Nays 14. 

Voted, at 10.35 p.m., That by virtue of Section 10, Chapter 
386 of the Acts of 1895, the Board of Public Works be and hereby 
is authorized to supervise the construction of said construction, 
to bind the Town by contract therefor, to take on behalf of the 
town by purchase or otherwise any lands, water rights, rights of 
way or easements in Andover deemed necessary for the estab- 
lishment of such an extension of the sewerage system and system 
of sewerage disposal and for connections therewith; to assess 
upon the estates benefited by the said extension their pro- 
portional part of the cost of the same and similarly to establish 
an annual charge for the privilege of connecting with the sewerage 
system of the town in accordance with the provisions of Section 
11, Chapter 386 of the Acts of 1895, and the provisions of all 
laws in that case made and provided, and to do any and all other 

22 



things reasonably necessary or expedient to accomplish the 
purposes of this act in conformity to the law in such case made 
and provided. 

Took up Article 2. 

Voted, at 10.38 p.m., That the sum of $1500 be appropriated 
for interest, this sum to be added to the amount appropriated 
at the annual town meeting, March 1, 1915. 

Voted, at 10.40 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officer's 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Town Clerk 



23 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
Received from tuition 
Received from miscellaneous sales 
Transferred from School Houses 



J. Francis Allison, Superintendent 
Nathan C. Hamblin, teaching 
Eugene Lovely, teaching 
Mary L. Smith, teaching 
Elizabeth M. Loftus, teaching 
Ruth K. Whiting 
James H. Morss, teaching 
Eleanor N. Irving, teaching 
Bernice B. Abbott, teaching 
Bernice G. Stimpson, teaching 
Eliza Spaulding, teaching 
Carolyn Dean, teaching 
Anne M. Downes, teaching 
Joanna P. Simmons, teaching 
Katherine T. Hannon, teaching 
Margaret S. Hoyt, teaching 
Mae Chase, teaching 
Frances Hobbs, teaching 
Florence I. Abbott, teaching 
Adele H. Duval, teaching 

Amount carried forward 







S40500 


00 






425 


50 






219 


99 






58 


11 




$41 203 


60 


S2038 


08 






1299 


98 






1219 


84 






809 


80 






769 


77 






619 


67 






1170 


08 






649 


80 






584 


84 






634 


85 






634 


85 






631 


43 






850 


06 






609 


92 






609 


92 






609 


92 






584 


84 






584 


84 






609 


92 






634 


85 






S16157 


26 





21 



Appropriation and Receipts 



$41203 60 



Amount brought forward 

Florance M. Prevost, teaching 
Jessie P. Brown, teaching 
Etta M. Dodge, teaching 
Helen E. Hartford, teaching 
Sara G. Cummings, teaching 
Lena M. Clark, teaching 
Gertrude Farrington, teaching 
Grace Hill, teaching 
Cynthia E. Flint, teaching 
Cecilia A. Derrah, teaching 
Rubina S. Copeland, teaching 
Carrie R. French, teaching 
Helen W. Battles, teaching 
Emma L. Ward, teaching 
Emily F. Carleton, teaching 
Mildred B. Morris, teaching 
Mary Bridge, teaching 
Edith H. Johnson, teaching 
Ella S. Morrill, teaching 
Hallie Stimpson, teaching 
Pauline A. Meyer, teaching 
Daisy I. Barrett, teaching 
Helen J. Brown, teaching 
Winfield W. Lunt, teaching 
Vivian Taylor, teaching 
Mrs. Grace Thomas, teaching 
Mrs. C. F. Copp, teaching 
Mrs. Geo. F. Ridings, teaching 
Lois Spickler, teaching 
Eilene Powers, teaching 
Marion B. Abbott, teaching 
Marion L. Abbott, teaching 
Isabel Tobin, teaching 
Margaret Mueller, teaching 

A mount carried forward 



$16157 26 
634 85 
540 95 
762 36 
584 84 
509 98 
609 92 
205 30 
758 92 
609 92 
601 70 
609 92 
363 17 
709 86 
584 84 
674 88 
523 14 
171 08 
527 63 
486 95 
540 32 
419 79 
419 79 
116 83 
378 96 
294 84 
87 50 
10 00 
18 75 

7 50 
207 30 

2 50 
17 50 

8 75 
5 00 

$29162 80 



25 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

Helen K. Hardy, teaching 

Irene M. Seed, teaching 

Marjorie Morrill, teaching 

Esther McGill, teaching 

Margaret G. Sharkey, teaching 

Mrs. A. G. Veasey, teaching 

Bessie P. Goldsmith, teaching 

Mary L. Cotter, teaching 

Lois J. Reed, teaching 

Grace Fisher, teaching 

Alice S. Coutts, teaching 

Mrs. Margaret C. Kimball, teaching 

Mrs. John Henderson, teaching 

William B. Hazelton, teaching 

Clara Putnam, teaching 

Clara L. Locke, teaching 

J. L. Williams, teaching 

Georgianna Lovejoy, clerk 

Ethel M. Eaton, clerk 

Annie Mcintosh, matron 

Herbert L. White, janitor 

James A. Eaton, janitor 

James McGhie, janitor 

William McEwan, janitor 

Granville K. Cutler, janitor 

John Crowley, janitor 

Alfred Melanson, janitor 

George Spickler, janitor 

Bay State St. Ry., transportation 

B. & M. Railroad, transportation 

Charles H. Newton, transportation 

Alvah Wright, transportation 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

S. K. Ames, supplies 

Amount carried forward 



$41203 


60 


$29162 80 




197 40 




77 50 




2 50 




5 00 




12 50 




12 50 




1 25 




15 00 




236 85 




126 32 




56 25 




115 43 




2 50 




197 40 




80 05 




22 50 




47 37 




120 00 




278 00 




222 00 




1199 64 




360 00 




420 00 




180 00 




180 00 




180 00 




96 00 




96 00 




800 00 




657 10 




444 00 




555 00 




99 12 




32 24 




S36290 22 





26 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 
Andrew Basso, supplies 
T. A. Holt Co., supplies 
J. Francis Allison, sundries 
The Andover Press, printing and supplies 
W. S. Holt & Son, supplies 
Hardy & Cole, labor and lumber 
Remington Typewriter Co., supplies 
Buchan & Francis, supplies 
E. E. Gray Co., supplies 
T. F. Morrissey & Son, team hire 
Am. Rattan & Reed Co., supplies 
J. H. Playdon, plants 
Valpey Bros., supplies 
J. H. Campion & Co., supplies 
N. E. Telephone Co. 
John A. Jenkins, supplies 
Wright's Express 
S. T. Shattuck 
Buchan & Francis, supplies 
J. L. Hammett, supplies 
Hiller & Co., supplies 
Robert Hutcheson, supplies 
Cross Coal Co., coal 
Andover Coal Co., coal 
James J. Abbott, wood 
Lawrence Gas Co., lighting 
American Express Co. 
Albert W. Lowe, supplies 
Winfield W. Lunt, supplies 
Benjamin Jacques, wood 
C. F. Emerson, teaming 
Cudahy Packing Co., supplies 
Xeostyle Co., supplies 
James Napier, truant officer 

Amount carried forward 

27 





S41203 


60 


S36290 


22 




1 


83 




67 


06 




64 


35 




301 


00 




28 


97 




223 


24 




13 


45 




13 


11 




5 


78 




111 


00 




19 


50 




8 


00 




4 


50 




21 


25 




61 


58 




11 


28 




17 


30 
75 




7 


31 

52 




4 


20 




1 


03 




1354 


76 




986 


15 




26 


00 




219 


57 




12 


94 




1 


15 




2 


50 . 




8 


00 




11 


79 




4 


00 




15 


03 




92 


24 




S39993 


36 





Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

Irene Seed, supplies 
Bessie P. Goldsmith, supplies 
West Disinfecting Co., supplies 
Frank H. Hardy, agent, brushes 
Ira Buxton, supplies 
J. E. Whiting, cleaning clocks 
W. H. Sylvester, tuning pianos 
H. F. Chase, supplies 
Louise R. Bailey, drinking-water 
County of Essex, tuition 
Leonard Saunders, police duty 
W. D. Walker, school physician 
Lawrence Lumber Co., lumber 
T. F. Lord Polish Co., supplies 
O. P. Chase, supplies 
Charlotte A. Baker, wood 
Pauline G. Meyer, supplies 
Ruth K. Whiting, supplies 
David M. May, police duty 
Albert Saunders, supplies 
Gavin H. McGhie, labor 
Board Public Works, water 
Edward E. Babb, supplies 
Theo Muise, labor 
Palmer, Parker Co., supplies 
Daisy I. Barrett, carfares 
G. C. Cannon, diplomas 
George H. Worcester, supplies 
Knox & Morse, supplies 
Joseph Melanson, labor 
Samuel R. Harris, labor 
Standard Oil Co., floor dressing 
Charles Barrett, labor 
Herbert L. White, labor 

A mount carried forward 





$41: 


203 60 


$39993 36 




2 


50 




3 


60 




57 


00 




44 


50 




16 


00 




8 


75 




27 


25 




11 


00 




4 


00 




109 


43 




2 


50 




190 


00 




2 


73 
80 




1 


09 




3 


75 
84 




6 


25 




1 


50 

75 




4 


00 




277 


05 




11 


83 




2 


00 




5 


00 




1 


90 




4 


00 




4 


00 
40 




5 


00 




1 


00 




26 


50 
50 




10 00 




S40840 78 





28 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

Pioneer Mfg. Co., supplies 

Scott Paper Co., supplies 

Underwood Typewriter Co., supplies 

Masury, Young Co., supplies 

Chandler & Barber, supplies 

Goldsmith & Clark, supplies 

Macey, Stetson & Morris Co., supplies 

Wakefield Chemical Co., supplies 

George E. Flint, 2nd, wood 

George F. Johnson & Co., supplies 

Nathan R. Bailey, wood 

R. B. Burnham, drinking-water 

Hall Paint & Hardware Co., supplies 

Royal Typewriter Co., supplies 

Standard Carbon Co., supplies 

Pyrene Co., supplies 

George Spickler, labor 

John Crowley, labor 

Poor & Riley, supplies 

Total expenditure $41203 60 $41203 60 





$41203 60 


$40840 


78 


3 


00 


18 


00 


100 


50 


15 


00 


26 


42 


2 


50 


12 


55 


5 


50 


9 


00 


10 


00 


10 


50 


48 


60 


1 


25 


60 


00 


2 


00 


12 


60 


2 


00 


4 


00 


1 


40 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $200 00 

City of Lawrence $ 74 12 

Balance unexpended 125 88 



$200 00 $200 00 



29 



SCHOOLHOUSES 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
Received from sales 



Frank E. Dodge, repairs 
P. J. Harris, repairs 
Timothy Haggerty, labor 
Ira Buxton, repairs 

C. A. Hill & Co., repairs 
Hardy & Cole, repairs 

D. Donovan & Son, painting 
William Knipe & Co., repairs 
Buchan & McNally, repairs 
Winthrop S. Boutwell, repairs 
Anderson & Bowman, repairs 
J. W. Richardson, repairs 
Allen F. Abbott, repairs 
Edwin C. Moody, repairs 
James S. May, painting 
Silatington Slate Co., repairs 
W. H. Coleman & Co., repairs 
Nettle & Co., supplies 

Boston & Lawrence Bolt Co., supplies 

E. W. McCabe & Co., repairs 
Andrew Wilson Co., repairs 
Buchan & McNally, supplies 
M. T. Walsh, repairs 
Wright Stafford & Son, repairs 
W. F. Duffee & Co., concreting 
Board Public Works, sidewalk 
Arthur O'Hara, labor 
Lawrence Gas Co., supplies 



Amount carried forward 2906 14 

30 







$3600 00 






5 25 




$3605 25 


$ 155 


03 




13 


17 




3 


00 




8 


80 




59 


10 




46 


83 




135 


10 




135 


60 




172 


44 




3 


50 




1 


35 




224 


81 




149 


23 




6 


53 




436 


00 




26 


23 




198 


17 




4 


00 




115 


00 




1 


20 


. 


280 


06 




265 


26 




83 


44 




152 


00 




206 


35 




21 


24 




1 


50 




1 


20 





Appropriation and Receipts $3605 25 

Amount brought forward 
Transferred to Schools 
Transferred to Books and Supplies 
Balance unexpended 

$3605 25 $3605 25 



$2906 14 


58 


11 


47 


35 


593 


65 



HIGH SCHOOL PLANS 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 — Balance from last year $250 52 

David L. Coutts 
F. H. Shattuck 
Andover Press 
L. D. Sherman 
Thomas James 
Frank I. Cooper 
W. H. Coleman 

Total expenditure 
Balance 

$250 52 $250 52 



$ 6 


00 


1 


25 


51 


70 


5 


00 


2 


00 


175 


00 


6 


00 


246 


95 


3 


57 



31 



SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $2400 00 

Received from sales 25 59 

Transferred from School Houses 47 35 



Ginn & Co., supplies $ 425 28 

American Book Co., supplies 273 52 

Edward E. Babb & Co., supplies 608 81 

J. L. Hammett & Co., supplies 232 89 

Houghton & Mifflin Co., supplies 73 07 

A. N. Palmer Co., supplies 24 13 

D. C. Heath & Co., Supplies 99 38 
Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, supplies 18 02 
Allyn & Bacon, supplies 51 20 
Albert W. Lowe, supplies 2 79 
Educational Publishing Co., supplies 4 15 
Milton Peabody Co., supplies 199 45 
Little, Brown & Co., supplies 5 04 
Eugene V. Lovely, supplies 2 50 
Gregg Publishing Co., supplies 42 21 
Silver, Burdett & Co., supplies 65 S3 
Adams, Cushing & Foster, supplies 16 00 
The Frontier Press Co., supplies 6 85 
Bausch & Tomb Optical Co., supplies 14 17 
Charles E. Merrill Co., supplies 32 72 
The Macmillan Co., supplies 47 58 
David Farquhar, supplies 92 88 

E. W. A. Rowles, supplies 9 55 
Tyer Rubber Co., supplies 3 50 
Wright's Express 31 15" 
American Express Co. 4 70 
Noyes Randall Co., supplies 1 08 



Amount carried forward $2388 45 

32 



2472 94 



Appropriation and Receipts 




$2472 94 


Amount brought forward 




$2388 45 


H. F. Chase, supplies 




1 00 


Holden Patent Book Cover Co. 


, supplies 


23 00 


Andover Press, supplies 




17 90 


C. F. Emerson, teaming 




25 40 


Manual Arts Press, supplies 




2 00 


Standard Carbon Co., supplies 




5 00 


Neostyle Co., supplies 




5 34 


The Dictionary of Thoughts 


Pub. Co., 




supplies 




4 85 



Total expenditure $2472 94 $2472 94 



33 



MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENTS 



TOWN OFFICERS 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $6500 00 

Geo. A. Higgins, treasurer $ 600 00 

Geo. A. Higgins, town clerk and clerk of 

selectmen 900 00 

Walter S. Donald, selectman, assessor and 

overseer of the poor 600 00 

Charles Bowman, selectman, assessor and 

overseer of the poor 600 00 

Harry M. Eames, chairman of selectmen, 

assessors and overseers of the poor 
Walter H. Coleman, auditor 
Nesbit G. Gleason, auditor 
David R. Lawson, auditor 
Alfred L. Ripley, moderator 
Registrars of voters 
Daniel J. Murphy, town counsel 
Election officers, town meeting 
Election officers, Precinct 1 Primaries 
Election officers, Precinct 2 Primaries 
Election officers, Precinct 1 State election 
Election officers, Precinct 2 State election 
Timothy Mahoney, checker, special town 

meeting 
C. A. Hill, checker, special town meeting 
Dr. J. J. Daly, town physician 
John W. Bell, collector 
Wm. C. Crowley, sealer of weights and 

measures 

Total expenditure 

Overdrawn 2 76 



700 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


10 


00 


98 


00 


362 


20 


75 


00 


67 


00 


40 


00 


75 


00 


40 


00 


3 


00 


3. 


00 


200 


00 


1809 


44 


170 


12 


$6502 76 



$6502 76 $6502 76 



34 



TREE WARDEN 




Appropriation, March 1, 1915 


$500 00 


Walter I. Morse, supplies 


S 1 70 


T. F. Morrissey & Son, teams 


10 50 


Ira Buxton, labor and supplies 


2 90 


Bert A. Wheeler, team 


2 70 


Anderson & Bowman, labor 


1 40 


Follansbee Nursery, trees 


24 50 


Austin S. Poland, labor 


5 55 


J. Howard Baker, labor 


104 21 


William Broderick, labor 


120 53 


William Hatch, labor 


118 99 


Jesse Hamilton, labor 


2 00 


John Stewart, labor 


3 66 


Ralph Baker, labor 


1 50 


Total expenditure 


$400 14 


Balance unexpended 


99 86 




$500 00 $500 00 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Dr. John P. Torrey 

Andover National Bank, safe deposit box 

Betts Bros. & Co., services of diver 

T. F. Morrissey & Son 

William Trautmann 

James H. Green 

Buchan & Francis, repairing grappling- 

hooks 
Lilla D. Stott, transfers of real estate 
Poor & Riley 
W. & L. G. Gurley, sealers weights, etc. 

Amount carried forward 



SI 700 00 



S 7 


44 


1 


00 


5 


00 


54 


14 


20 


25 


6 


00 


3 


50 


2 


70 


40 


60 


1 


02 


52 


12 



$193 77 



35 



Appropriation, March 1,1915 $1700 00 

Amount brought forward $ 193 77 

Expenses incurred in recovering bodies at 

Ballardvale 133 75 

E. F. Conkey, cleaning sanitary, B. Vale 5 00 

Walter H. Coleman & Co. 4 00 

Edith P. Sellars, printing jury list 1 00 

County Commissioners, laying out Brook 

Street 6 00 

Thomas F. Dailey 10 00 

John A. Riley, attendance on Board of 
Registrars 

Myerscough & Buchan 

Boston & Maine Railroad, trip tickets 

C. Madeleine Hewes, clerical work 

John Franklin, preparing plans 

American Express Co. 

Expenses incurred by Selectmen, attending 
hearings 

Parker & Co. 

J. H. McDonald, P. O. box rent 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Mary E. Bonner, board for divers 

Walter I. Morse 

Geo. A. Higgins, carfare and expenses 

A. M. Colby, auto signs for schools 

H. M. Eames, perambulating five town 
lines. Tewksbury, No. Andover, 
No. Wilmington, No. Reading, 

Lawrence. 20 00 

Charles F. Emerson 6 00 

Wm. H. Foster, auto hire 24 00 

John Breen, return of deaths 1 50 

M.J. Mahoney, return of deaths 3 50 

Charles Bowman, perambulating town 
lines. No. Andover, No. Reading, 
Wilmington, Lawrence, Tewksbury. 20 00 



13 


00 


21 


00 


34 


50 


53 


60 


37 


00 


3 


61 


10 


45 


4 


50 


2 


40 


1 


50 


5 


00 




64 


13 


00 


30 


00 



Amount carried forward $ 658 72 

36 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

Amount brought forward 

Dr. C. E. Abbott, return of births 
Dr. \Y. D. Walker, return of births 
Dr. C. W. Scott, return of births 

E. W. Prescott, Corporation returns 
Dr. Percy J. Look, return of births 
Walter S. Donald, perambulating town 

lines. No. Andover, No. Reading, 
Wilmington, Lawrence, Tewksbury. 

Dr. E. D. Lane, return of births 

Dr. J.J. Daly, return of births 

Dr. E. C. Conroy, return of births 

Dr. Daniel T. Buzzell, return of births 

Ira B. Hill, field driver 

Everett M. Lundgren, return of deaths 

W. F. Gledhill, fish warden 

F. H. Stacey, trip ticket 

Total expenditure 
Transferred to Brush Fires 
Transferred to Board of Health 
Transferred to Insurance 

Total 
Balance 



$1700 00 



$658 


72 


2 


75 


10 


25 


1 


50 


80 


17 




75 


20 


00 


6 


75 


4 


75 


1 


50 




25 


25 


00 


19 


50 


10 


00 


23 


00 


$864 89 


235 


90 


310 


91 


119 


81 


$1531 


51 


168 


49 



$1700 00 $1700 00 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
Lawrence Gas Co. 
Unexpended 



$5961 24 
338 76 



$6300 00 



$6300 00 $6300 00 



37 



INSURANCE 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 




S950 00 


Workmen's Compensation Act 




500 00 


Premiums 




130 67 


Transferred from Miscellaneous 




119 81 


Smart & Flagg 


S999 07 




Smart & Flagg, Workmen's Compensation 






Act 


701 41 




Total expenditure 


SI 700 48 


S1700 48 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 




$8500 00 


Appropriation, Fire Alarm Boxes 




225 


00 


Received for sale of manure 




20 


00 


Received for earnings of horses 




1056 


14 




S9801 


14 


RUNNING EXPENSES 






Charles C. Serra, chauffeur 


S 441 00 






Lester Hilton, chauffeur 


996 00 






Ivan S. Steadman, chauffeur 


996 00 






George Dick, chauffeur 


541 00 






John Collins, driver 


780 00 






John Haggerty, driver 


780 00 






Lawrence Gas Co., electricity and gas 


79 19 






Buchan & Francis, supplies 


14 34 






Walter I. Morse, supplies 


95 35 






Louis W. Bells, supplies 


37 67 






Payroll, Co. No. 1 


789 57 






Payroll, Co. No. 2 


495 00 






Lewis T. Hardy, chief 


150 00 






Walter I. Morse, engineer 


75 00 






Allan Simpson, engineer 


75 00 






H. S. Neal, janitor 


100 00 






Amount carried forward 


S6445 12 





38 



Appropriations and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 
Ira Buxton, engineer 
Tyer Rubber Co., blowing whistle 
Dr. A. W. Baker, horse dentist 
Crowley & Co., medicine 
F. H. Stacey, medicine 
Andrew Wilson Co., repairing roof 
Morrison & O'Connell, shoeing & repairs 
C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 
Fred Collins, labor 
John Haggerty, telephone 
James S. May, painting 
W. H. Gibson, laundry 
T. A. Holt Co., grain, etc. 
Fred Adams, labor 
S. T. Shattuck, teaming 
Dr. J. F. Winchester, veterinary services 
Walter S. Donald, hay 
F. L. Cole, coats 
John A. Collins, labor 
W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 
Haynes & Juhlmann, grain, etc. 
E. W. Boutwell, hay 
A. W. Lowe, supplies 
T. F. Morrissey, straw, etc. 
American La France Engine Co., supplies 
Charles A. Jameson, hay 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., use of 

telephone 
J. E. Whiting, cleaning clock 
Board of Public Works, water 
J. H. Campion & Co., grain, etc. 
Myerscough & Buchan, labor & supplies 
Poor & Riley, grain, etc. 

A. M. Colby, repairs 

B. F. Holt, hay 







$9801 14 


$6445 


12 




100 


00 




50 


00 




2 


00 




3 


05 




8 


81 




3 


21 




50 


00 




28 


70 




1 


00 




25 


44 




4 


50 




26 


96 




68 


70 




1 


00 




1 


00 




3 


00 




20 37 




95 


00 




2 


00 




102 


19 




102 


03 




28 


71 




4 


25 




48 


41 




42 


52 




52 


75 




53 


52 
75 




49 47 




61 


11 




8 


95 




125 


07 




25 


55 




24 


37 





Amount carried forward 



$7669 51 



39 



Appropriations and Receipts, 

Amount brought forward $7669 51 

Exide Battery Depots Inc., battery 13 37 

Hardy & Cole, lumber and repairs 204 98 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 66 36 

Anderson & Bowman, shoeing & repairing 53 50 

P. J. Daly & Co., grain, etc. 56 10 

Smith & Manning, grain, etc. 57 93 

Wm. Knipe & Co., labor 20 24 

Tver Rubber Co., supplies 7 98 

N. E. Petroleum Co., supplies 3 75 

Fred Adams et al, labor 4 50 

Fred H. Wentworth, 1 regulation overcoat 25 00 

Gamewell Fire Alarm & Tel. Co., supplies 36 92 

Andover Press, printing 20 15 

H. M. Eames, hay 157 48 

Andover Coal Co., coal 281 20 

Timothy Haggerty, labor 20 00 

Ira Buxton, supplies and repairs 139 95 

The Dayton Tire Co., tires 300 55 

Wright's Express 1 99 

American Express Co. 5 55 



S9801 14 



Total running expenses 9147 01 

HOSE 

Berlin Woven Hose & Rubber Co. $350 00 
William and Charles Beck 144 00 

494 00 

FIRE ALARM BOXES 

Gamewell Fire Alarm & Tel. Co. $109 15 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 15 75 

C. A. Hill & Co., labor and supplies 23 09 

W. H. Coleman, labor and supplies 77 75 



225 74 



Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 



$9866 75 



65 61 



$9866 75 $9866 75 



40 



POLICE 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

Received from Treas. Essex Co., for kill 

Myerscough & Buchan, auto service 
Auto List Publishing Co., auto lists 
Edward S. Hardy, police duty 
Walter I. Morse, supplies 
Ira Buxton, supplies 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 
W. H. Gibson, laundry 
Smith & Manning, supplies 
American Express Co. 
T. F. Morrissey & Son 
A. M. Colby, supplies 
Buchan & McNally, supplies 
Frank L. Cole, supplies 
W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 
Frank M. Smith, carfare and food fur- 
nished prisoners 
George C. Dunnells, police duty 
John A. Riley, police duty 
C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 
Leonard Saunders, police duty 
Elmer H. Shattuck, police duty 
Olin McCarthy, police duty 
Timothy McCarthy, police duty 
David M. May, police duty 
Traffic Sign Co., street auto signs 
Frank Carse, police duty 
Edwin L. Brown, police duty 
William C. Brown, police duty 
Chester H. Lawrence, police duty 
Andover Press, printing 
M. T. Welch, police duty 
School Department, typewriter 
Allen F. Abbott, police duty 

Amount carried forward $643 09 

41 





$450.0 00 


g dogs 


36 00 




4536 00 


$ 54 00 




13 00 




1 50 




8 53 




70 




46 11 




3 12 




2 00 




1 30 




10 25 




2 00 




65 




5 75 




10 88 




52 60 




120 00 




4 00 




3 15 




90 50 




2 50 




7 50 




5 50 




26 00 




11 80 




29 50 




9 50 




5 00 




16 50 




7 40 




71 00 




10 00 




10 85 





Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

John Nicoll, police duty 

F. H. Stacey, paper cups and R.R. tickets 

George W. Fraize 

E. F. Conkey, police duty 

Anderson & Bowman 

Stephen E. Abbott, police duty 

Dr. Percy J. Look, medical attendance 

Dr. W. D. Walker, medical attendance 

The Detective Publishing Co. 

Charles M. Newton, police duty 

James Napier, food furnished prisoners 

Wm. L. Frye, Railroad fares & expenses 

Thomas F. Dailey, police duty 

Henry W. Piatt, police duty 

Ralph Bruce, police duty 

Daniel P. Webster, regular police 

William L. Frye, regular police 

James Napier, regular police 

Frank M. Smith, chief 

Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 



TOWN HOUSE 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

Lawrence Gas Co., gas and electricity 

Salem Kill Dust Co., supplies 

T. A. Holt Co., supplies 

Wm. Knipe & Co , labor and repairs 

W. F. Chisholm, supplies 

Oral C. Richards Co., painting flagpole 

Hopkinson & Holden, rubber mat 

A mount carried forward 





S4536 00 


$ 643 


09 


4 


00 


26 


10 


1 


00 


28 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


7 


00 


1 


55 


28 


98 


72 


00 


12 


00 


60 


00 


845 


00 


845 


00 


845 


00 


1100 


00 


$4536 


22 




22 



$4536 22 $4536 22 



$2000 00 



S220 63 


^ 

3 


00 




70 


75 


85 


3 


60 


6 


00 


7 


80 



$315 58 



42 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

Amount brought forward 

Pools Mfg. Co., tube cleaner 

Sadie Hobbs, laundry 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

J. E. Whiting, cleaning clocks 

Boston Regalia Co., repairing gavel 

Andover Coal Co., coal 

Andrew Wilson Co., repairs on roof 

C. A. Hill & Co., labor and supplies 

James S. May, painting 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 

J. W. Richardson, labor 

Charles Baker, wood 

Peoples Ice Co., ice 

Ira Buxton, labor and supplies 

The O. L. Story Scenic Co., supplies 

Charles P. Rea, labor 

George W. Mears, janitor 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 





S2000 00 


S 315 


58 


5 


08 


9 


72 


15 


96 


2 


50 


2 


50 


, 265 


96 


18 


45 


20 


00 


36 


90 


26 


42 


4 


41 


3 


50 


7 


50 


7 


75 


11 


80 


8 


00 


720 


00 




70 



Total expenditure S1486 73 

Balance 513 27 



S2000 00 S2000 00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Appropriation, March 1,1915 S1250 00 

Hobbs & Warren, supplies S 20 22 

Carter Ink Co., supplies 1 25 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., supplies 19 94 

Birmingham Pen Co., supplies 6 50 

Andover Press, printing and supplies 766 49 

Wright & Potter Printing Co., supplies 4 50 

Review and Record Publishers, supplies 5 00 



Amount carried forward, S823 90 

43 



Appropriation March 1, 1915 

Amount brought forward, 

Webster loose leaf 

P. B. Murphy, printing 

Tyer Rubber Co., supplies 

Loose Leaf Card Co.. supplies 

Wakefield Daily Item, printing 

John H. McDonald, envelopes 

Auto List Pub. Co., auto lists and supplies 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



STATE TAX 





$1250 00 


823 


90 


5 


59 


3 


75 


1 


75 


27 


19 




55 


106 


48 


25 


00 


S994 


21 


2SS 


79 



S1250 00 S1250 00 



State Treasurer 
State Treasurer 



Charles L. Burrill, Pub. Service Corp. Tax $ 84 86 
Charles L. Burrill, State Tax 22132 50 

Charles L. Burrill, State Highway Tax 1376 47 



S 84 86 
23508 97 

S23593 83 



Total expenditure 



S23593 83 



S23593 83 S23593 83 



COUNTY TAX 



Appropriation. March 1, 1915 
David I. Robinson, County Treas. 



S15392 08 



S15392 08 



S15392 08 $15392 08 



44 



DOG TAX 



Received from David I. Robinson, County Treas. 
F. S. Boutwell, Treasurer of 

Memorial Hall $655 51 



$655 51 



$655 51 $655 51 



G. A. R. POST 99 



Appropriation, Acts 1913, Chap. 62 
Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster 

Total expenditure 



$50 00 



$50 00 



$50 00 $50 00 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster 

Total expenditure 



$350 00 



$350 00 



$350 00 $350 00 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
Received from sale of Lots 



William Ross, labor 

Hardy & Cole, lumber 

Horace Hale Smith, surveying and plans 

Philip Allicon, labor 

E. F. Conkey, team and labor 

Walter Stickney, labor 

Dennis Sweeney, repairs and labor 

Joseph Descharnot, labor 

George Dumont, labor and team 

Andover Press, printing 

Amount carried forward 





$1000 00 




280 50 




$1280 50 


$ 21 38 




1 45 




115 00 




369 01 




28 00 




202 00 




2 60 




156 00 




56 50 




3 00 





$ 954 94 



45 



Appropriation and Receipts $1280 50 

Amount brought forward $ 954 94 

Fred Aborn, labor 27 00 

J. H. Playdon, plants 12 50 

O. W. Vennard, superintendent 200 00 

Smith & Manning, fertilizer 24 00 

Walter I. Morse 30 60 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, use of horses 4 50 

George W. Foster, preparing deeds 7 50 



Total expenditure $1261 04 

Balance 19 46 



$1280 50 $1280 50 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
F. S. Boutwell, Treas. Memorial 
Hall Library 


$1800 00 


$1800 00 


Total expenditure 


$1800 00 

$ 22 83 
100 00 


$1800 00 


HAY SCALES 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

J. E. Pitman, repairs 

Ira Buxton, Town weigher 


$125 00 


Total expenditure 
Unexpended 


$122 83 
2 17 





$125 00 $125 00 
46 



NOTES GIVEN 

Mar. 3, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 26, due Nov. 10 $10000 00 

Mar. 3, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 27 ; due Nov. 16 10000 00 

Mar. 3, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 28, due Nov. 19 15000 00 

Mar. 3, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 29, due Nov. 23 15000 00 

Mar. 3, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 30, due Nov. 26 20000 00 
Total amount borrowed $70000 00 



NOTES PAID 



Nov. 10, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 26 $10000 00 

Nov. 16, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 27 10000 00 

Nov. 19, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 28 15000 00 

Nov. 23. Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 29 15000 00 

Nov. 26, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 30 20000 00 
Total amount notes paid $70000 00 



PUBLIC DUMP 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $75 00 

Olaf Benson, care dump $75 00 



Total expenditure $75 00 S75 00 

47 



Feb. 



Mar. 



Mar. 

April 
April 



INTEREST 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
Feb. 11, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
13 Sewer coupons 

26, Old Colony Trust Co., 17 
Water coupons 

8, Bureau of Statistics, Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, 
Notes No. 26 to 30 inclusive 

Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Int. 
on Notes No. 26, 27, 28, 29, 
30, at 314% 

Mar. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 26 
Water coupons 

27, Old Colony Trust Co., 3 Sewer 
coupons 

1 , John W. Bell , 2 Sewer coupons 
7, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
18 Water coupons, at 17J/£ 
April 30, Old Colony Trust Co., 10 

Water coupons 
April 30, Old Colony Trust Co., 30 

Andover Loan Act coupons 
May 8, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

25 Water coupons 
May 28, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
10 Water coupons 
Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

38 Water coupons 
Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

38 Water coupons, at 17}/£ 
Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

28 Sewer coupons 
Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
1 Water coupon 
17, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
1 Water coupon 



$13000 00 



June 


8, 


June 


8, 


June 


8, 


July 


9, 


July 


17, 



260 00 
340 00 

10 00 



1618 


68 


520 


00 


60 


00 


40 


00 


315 


00 


200 


00 


600 


00 


500 


00 


200 


00 


760 


00 


665 


00 


560 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 



A mount carried forward 



$6688 68 



48 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $13000 00 

Amount brought forward $6688 68 

Aug. 9, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Sewer coupon 20 00 
Sept. 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

17 Water coupons 340 00 

Sept. 24, Old Colony Trust Co., 25 

Water coupons 500 00 

Sept. 24, Old Colony Trust Co., 10 

Sewer coupons 200 00 

Oct. 16, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

17 Water coupons, 17^ 297 50 

Oct. 22, Old Colony Trust Co., 30 

Andover Loan Act coupons 600 00 

Oct. 22, Old Colony Trust Co., 9 

Water coupons 180 00 

Nov. 6, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

25 Water coupons 500 00 

Nov. 22, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

2 Water coupons 40 00 
Dec. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

25 W T ater coupons 500 00 

Dec. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

36 W T ater coupons, at 17 3^2 630 00 

Dec. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

13 Water coupons 260 00 

Dec. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

22 Sewer coupons 440 00 

Dec. 22, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

60 Abbott Village Sewer 

coupons 1200 00 

Dec. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

8 Water coupons 160 00 

Dec. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

6 Sewer coupons 120 00 



Amount carried forward $12676 18 

49 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 S13000 00 

Amount brought forward S12676 18 

Dec. 31, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Water coupon 20 00 



Total expenditure S12696 18 

Balance 303 82 



S13000 00 S13000 00 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915, Water Bonds S11000 00 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915, And over Loan Act 

Bonds 5000 00 



S 16000 00 



Mar. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., Water 

Bond, No. 285 S1000 00 

Apr. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water Bond, No. 213 1000 00 

Apr. 30, Old Colony Trust Co., Water 

Bond, No. 331 1000 00 

June 8, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water Bonds, Nos. 237-247 2000 00 

Sept. 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water Bond, No. 314 1000 00 

Oct. 22, Old Colony Trust Co., Andover 

Loan Act Bonds, Nos. 11-15 5000 00 

Nov. 6, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
Water Bonds, Nos. 126 to 
130 inclusive 5000 00 



Total expenditure S16000 00 $16000 00 

50 



WATER DEPARTMENT MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $10000 00 

Mar. 20, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works $1000 00 

Apr. 17, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 2000 00 

May 13, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 2000 00 

May 31, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 2000 00 

Oct. 11, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 1500 00 

Dec. 11, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 1500 00 



Total expenditure $10000 00 $10000 00 



WATER DEPARTMENT CONSTRUCTION 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $3000 00 

Appropriation for Extension 1500 00 

Aug. 2, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works $1000 00 

Sept. 16, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 1500 00 

Nov. 15, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 2000 00 



Total Expenditure $4500 00 $4500 00 



WATER DEPARTMENT SINKING FUND 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $750 00 

Nov. 15, Willis B. Hodgkins, Treasurer 

Sinking Fund $750 00 



Total expenditure $750 00 $750 00 

51 



SEWER DEPARTMENT MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $1800 00 

Jan. 30, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works $200 00 

Feb. 18, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 500 00 

Apr. 20, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 500 00 

Dec. 11, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Board Public Works 600 00 



Total expenditure $1800 00 $1800 00 



SEWER DEPARTMENT SINKING FUND 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $1000 00 

Nov. 15, Willis B. Hodgkins, Treasurer 

Sinking Funds $1000 00 



Total expenditure $1000 00 $1000 00 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

The work of the Board of Health for the year 1915 has been 
considerably increased, according to its records for the previous 
three years. The number of contagious diseases reported during 
1914 was 66, for the past year 318. The cases were divided 
as follows: 

Chicken Pox 40 

Diphtheria 27 

v Measles 63 

Ophthalmia 2 

Typhoid Fever 2 

Scarlet Fever 39 

Tuberculosis 19 

Mumps 5 

German Measles 106 

Spinal Meningitis 3 

Whooping Cough 12 

318 
52 






During the past year there have been sixteen deaths caused by 
communicable diseases as follows: 

Tuberculosis 12 

Spinal Meningitis 2 

Whooping Cough 1 

Tetanus 1 



16 

German Measles, Measles and Chicken Pox occurred in 
epidemic form. But the number of cases reported does not 
show the extent to which these diseases occurred in total, for 
although the physicians who were called to attend cases reported 
them promptly, many cases had no medical attendance; and 
we would call the attention of all citizens to the fact that they 
are required by law to give personal notice to the Board of 
Health of all cases of contagious disease occurring in their 
households, even though a physician may not be summoned. 
A heavy penalty is incurred for neglect in conforming to this rule. 

The cases of Scarlet Fever occurring in the vicinity of the 
Indian Ridge School were fortunately mild, but for this reason 
its early detection was made more difficult, and a temporary rule 
was adopted, that all pupils who were absent for any reason 
whatever should not be allowed to return to school without a 
physician's certificate; this rule was somewhat criticized at the 
time, but there is no question as to its efficiency in controlling 
what might have been a much more serious epidemic, and we 
heartily commend the school authorities for their prompt co- 
operation. 

The cases of Diphtheria were also as a rule, of short duration, 
owing, we are convinced, to the efficient use of antitoxin and 
careful quarantine. We have had occasion to quarantine several 
persons who were wage-earners, and in such cases they are 
entitled to an amount equal to three-fourths of their pay pro- 
vided it shall not amount to more than $2.00 per day. 

The occurrence of so many cases of communicable diseases 
indicates to your Board the urgent need of a school nurse to aid 
in the work of the school physician and Board of Health. The 
matter of "preparedness" which is at this time so much in the 

53 - 



public mind can find no more feasible position than in the cause 
of public health. The health of a community cannot be reckoned 
by the number of able-bodied men and women, but rather by 
its death-rate and the evidences of communicable diseases in its 
environment. The prevention of disease, and curtailment of 
its spread in the form of epidemics should be the province of 
the Board of Health, but in order to carry out its measures to 
the fullest capacity, several things are necessary. The education 
of the public to the fact that the work of the Board of Health 
is not obtrusive except in so far as it pertains to the vital welfare 
of the town as a whole, to see that certain rules which by legis- 
lative procedure have become matters of law, and the rules and 
regulations of the local Board, are being complied with. To 
this end it must have the cooperation of the town's civic, edu- 
cational, religious and charitable organizations. 

The advice and service of our district health officer during 
the year has been both helpful and inspiring, and the faithful 
work of the visiting nurse in her multiform duties can only be 
appreciated by those who know to what an extent that work 
has been carried out and extended. That the best development 
of the child, mental and physical, can only be obtained under 
good hygienic surroundings both at home and in the school, 
brings the work of the school physician, visiting nurse, and 
Board of Health in close contact, and with this end in view we 
heartily endorse the enlargement of the work as outlined in the 
object for which the newly-formed Public Health Association 
has been incorporated. 

The agencies upon which your Board must rely in order to 
meet with the approbation of the town are therefore manifold, 
but the most important factors are those which aid in the bodily 
resistance to disease and the prevention of its spread. We 
desire to express our appreciation of the work of The Andover 
Village Improvement Society as carried on from year to year, 
not only for its intrinsic worth to the town, but as an incentive 
to the more cleanly and painstaking care of private property, 
which makes for public health and security. Widespread 
popular education and public opinion are slowly but surely 
moving in the same direction; "An ounce of prevention is worth 

54 



a pound of cure", and to this end we can but approve of any 
essential factor which has for its object a higher standard of 
civic and personal health. 

Many nuisances which have annually given much trouble, 
have been during the past year, abated permanently; and with 
the extension of the sewer system much more can be accom- 
plished. The sewerage question has received much attention 
and considerable time has been given to its consideration. With 
one or two exceptions, which will be remedied, all abutters on 
public sewers now constructed have caused their property to 
be connected. As soon as the Abbott Village sewer is com- 
pleted, and the abutters have had suitable time to make con- 
nections therewith, we propose to have the inspector of plumbing 
make a return visit to each property connected to see that the 
use of all cesspools and vaults has been discontinued. We have 
recommended to the Board of Public Works the need of a sewer 
on Ridge Street, and at the lower end of School Street. 

Milk inspection at present can only be carried out as a direct 
part of the work of the Board of Health, and during the coming 
year every dairy in town will be inspected, and conditions being 
favorable, a permit will be issued for the sale of milk. The 
examination of samples of milk has of necessity been dropped, 
as the only piece of apparatus owned by the town, an old model 
hand Babcock machine, has been condemned by the State 
authorities. If the town desires this work done in a suitable 
manner, it will necessitate the expenditure of a sum of money 
sufficient to secure an electric power Babcock machine with 
hot water attachment, analytical balances, platinum dishes for 
estimation of total solids, and a microscope for bacterial count. 

The inspection of vinegar (required by law in Massachusetts) 
comes under this same heading and the State has ruled that it 
must be done by a qualified chemist. The present inspector has 
been notified that he will be recognized as such. This work can 
therefore be done without employing an additional chemist. 

Regular meetings of the Board occur the second Monday 
of each month, but we are ready and willing to receive complaints 
at all times, and can assure a prompt investigation, provided 
these complaints are made in writing and properly signed. 

55 



5250 


00 


196 


00 


128 


00 


46 


00 




35 


22 


44 



Realizing early in the year that the services of a trained nurse 
would be of value we appointed Miss Emily Sprague as an agent 
of the Board. 

Mr. Charles H. Newton was nominated by the Board as 
Inspector of Slaughtering and approved by the State Board 
of Health. The expenditures during the past year are as follows: 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $1000.00 

Chas. H. Newton, Inspector of Cattle 

Chas. H. Newton, Inspector of Slaughtering 

Joseph Nolan, Inspector of Plumbing 

William Knipe, Assistant Inspector of 
Plumbing 

Wright's Express 

Andover Press, advertising and printing 

Dr. J. F. Winchester, inspection of con- 
demned meat 5 00 

Dr. Chas. E. Abbott, Secretary of the 
Board of Health 

Bancroft T. Haynes, salary 

Franklin H. Stacey, salary 

Franklin H. Stacey, salary Milk Inspector 

John H. McDonald, Postmaster 

Hobbs & Warren, milk license books 

Telephone 

Transportation 

Branding outfit, Inspector of Slaughtering 

Burying dead animals 

Hardware 

Total $937 80 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 

Quarantine 

Dr. J. J. Daly, fumigation 

Dr. Chas. E. Abbott, fumigation 

Dr. W. D. Walker, fumigation 

Amount carried forward $243 11 

56 



75 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


75 


00 


27 


56 


6 


00 


1 


10 




20 


2 


65 


2 


35 




15 



% 91 


11 


2 


00 


139 


00 


11 


00 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

Amount brought forward 

Bancroft T. Haynes, fumigation 

Dr. P. J. Look, fumigation 

Franklin H. Stacey, fumigators 

Wright's Express 

Telephone 

Dr. H. H. Nevers, examining diphtheria 

cultures 
Transportation 
Hobbs & Warren, record book 

Total 

Total general expense 

Transferred from miscellaneous 







S1000 00 


S243 


11 




28 


16 




10 


00 




65 


50 




2 


62 




1 


00 




14 


00 




4 


14 




4 


58 




S 373 


11 




937 


80 


310 91 



S1310 91 $1310 91 



Respectfully submitted, 



FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHAS. E. ABBOTT, M.D. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 



57 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



Your Overseers of the Poor present the following report for 
the year ending December 31, 1915. 

During the past year the changes in the Almshouse demanded 
by State Inspector Carey have been complied with ; the windows 
opening to the fire escapes have been changed into the form of 
doors, with steps to the window-sill, so as to permit easy egress 
in case of fire. The fire escapes have been extended nearer to 
the ground. A part of one of the house wings has been shingled. 
The floor of the laundry in the basement was so worn that it 
would have to be replaced, but as the floor timbers were badly 
decayed, it was deemed the part of economy to put in a cement 
floor. A new henhouse has also been built. All these repairs 
could not have been completed had not our superintendent 
performed a great amount of labor. 

The question is often asked, why these yearly appropriations 
for repairs? The answer is that we have a large, rambling build- 
ing, an ideal when built, to meet the conditions then existing, 
but so constructed that it is necessary for quite an outlay each 
year to keep the house in the condition we know our people 
demand. 

At the present time the inmates are mostly those who are not 
only advanced in years but also in a feeble condition, requiring 
their meals to be served in their rooms; this and the extra work 
that always attends sickness, make the duties of our superin- 
tendent and matron more than usually arduous, and the inmates 
are fortunate, and appreciate, that those in charge of the Town 
Farm are at all times ready and anxious to do all in their power 
to make them as comfortable and happy as possible. 

For Almshouse expenses we would ask that the sum of $4200 
be appropriated; for repairs, the sum of $450; to meet the re- 
quirements of Chapter 763, Acts of 1913, an act for suitably 
aiding mothers with dependent children, the sum of $800. 

H. M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Overseers of the Poor 
58 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
Receipts from Town Farm 



S. K. Ames, supplies $ 45 76 

Anderson & Bowman, blacksmith work 36 53 

H. Bruckman, grain 134 85 

Beach Soap Co., soap 16 55 

R. H. Sugatt, clothing 16 50 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 19 67 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 36 55 

Armour & Co., supplies 15 78 

F. Orris Rea, supplies 65 

Herbert Lewis, labor 10 20 

Ira Buxton, supplies 6 55 

Ralph A. Bailey, supplies 3 20 

Andover Coal Co., coal 342 00 
C. M. Dillon, painting and repairing 

wagon 13 60 

Board Public Works, water 70 81 

S. H. Bailey, supplies 1 00 

Providence Churning Co., supplies 10 50 

Alvin Jenkins, pasturing heifer 6 00 

Valpey Bros., provisions 227 81 

L. E. Chase, supplies 28 66 

George H. Woodman, shoes 1 25 

Frank L. Cole, clothing 36 77 

J. H. Campion & Co., groceries 140 69 

Smith & Manning, groceries 204 62 

T. A. Holt Co., groceries 520 37 

Robertson & Sutherland, dry goods 23 40 

Reid & Hughes, dry goods 83 94 

Albert W. Lowe, drugs 50 16 

George C. Dunnells, fish 22 90 

Robert Hutcheson, fish 48 86 

Amount carried forward $2176 13 



$4200 00 
426 21 

$4626 21 



59 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

The Family Shoe Store, shoes 

New England Produce Co., groceries 

F. C. Small & Co., groceries 

Lawrence Gas Co. 

Frank H. Hardy, baskets 

Cold Spring Brewing Co., malt 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 

J. P. West, supplies 

J. H. Playdon, plants 

N. L. Harwood, supplies 

J. P. Wakefield, provisions 

Walter I. Morse, hardware 

J. P. Wyllie & Co., shoes 

Hiller & Co., supplies 

Morrison & O'Connell, blacksmith work 

Walter C. Boyce, supplies 

George H. Pearce, labor 

A. M. Colby, supplies 

Standard Oil Co., supplies 

Walker Holden, plants 

J. E. Whiting, supplies 

J. W. Barnard & Son, shoes 

Charles Robinovitz, shoes and repairing 

H. J. Furneaux, provisions 

C. A. Stone, labor 

Andover Press, printing 

Albert E. Gilman, supplies 

Crowley & Co., drugs 

Geo. L. Averill, fertilizer and grain 

F. L. Holt, labor 

George Brown, shoes 

Peoples Ice Co., ice 

O. P. Chase, papers and supplies 

Charles Thiras, supplies 

Amount carried forward 







S S4626 21 


$2176 


13 




15 


70 




41 


80 




60 


24 




150 


11 




2 


00 




5 


54 




1 


32 




10 


04 




10 


00 




48 


87 


• 


115 


78 




39 


73 




1 


50 




2 


10 




5 


00 




20 


00 




16 


92 




6 


90 




2 


50 




2 


40 




1 


90 




1 


50 




16 


10 




39 


60 




8 


60 




3 


00 




6 


92 




21 


30 




51 


00 




16 


56 




11 


55 




50 


00 




15 


25 




4 


96 




$2982 


82 





60 



Appropriation and Receipts 




S4626 21 


Amount brought forward 


S2982 


82 


T. F. Morrissey & Co., straw 


16 


22 


A. Basso, supplies 


5 


33 


Dean & Gardner, supplies 




75 


D. F. Chase, supplies 


60 


63 


Fred A. Swanton, superintendent 


800 


00 


Kate Sheehan, labor 


15 


00 


Mary Heald, labor 


32 


50 


Agnes Keeape, labor 


161 


00 


Gustavus Johnson, labor 


163 


46 


Julia Sullivan, labor 


42 


00 


Bertha Jansson, labor 


55 


00 


Kate Meelon, labor 


10 


00 


Clara Done, labor 


5 


00 


Mrs. Whalon, labor 


30 


00 


Nellie Rogers, labor 


3 


00 


Annie Keenan, labor 


8 


00 


Theresa Whalen, labor 


5 


00 


Margaret Karghon, labor 


20 


00 


Robina Mitchell, labor 


45 


00 


Mary E. Gillen, labor 


25 


00 


Isabel Sinclair, labor 


105 


00 


Theresa McCormicle, labor 


7 


50 


John L. Leasson, labor 


144 


00 


Total expenditure 


$4742 


21 


Overdrawn 




116 00 



$4742 21 $4742 21 



61 



PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMSHOUSE 

House furniture $1100 00 

Clothing 350 00 

Farm stock 985 00 

Farm tools 360 00 

Farm produce 301 00 

Fuel 394 20 

Provisions 85 00 



$3575 20 



ALMSHOUSE REPAIRS 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $800 00 

Buchan & McNally, supplies and labor 

George D. Ward, labor 

D. M. Pingree Co., sawdust 

George H. Pearce, paper and labor 

Frank E. Dodge, cement and labor 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 

Hardy & Cole, lumber and labor 

Walter I. Morse, hardware 

James C. Souter & Co., supplies 

Anderson & Bowman, supplies and labor 

Harry S. Wright, supplies 

George Dufton, labor 

Pacific Mills, ashes 

James S. May, supplies and labor 

Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 

$800 00 $800 00 



$ 60 


10 


14 


05 


11 


46 


23 


08 


79 


37 


5 


60 


242 


26 


27 


27 


24 


20 


14 


10 


4 


13 


18 


00 


3 


00 


33 


50 


$560 


12 


239 


88 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $900 00 

Amount expended $705 70 

Amount unexpended 194 30 



$900 00 $900 00 
62 



STATE AID 

Appropriation, March 1, 1915 $1500 00 

Amount expended $1394 00 

Amount unexpended 106 00 





$1500 00 
ENT CHILE 


$1500 00 


AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPEND] 


)REN 


Appropriation, March 1, 1915 




$500 00 


Town cases 


$443 00 




On account other cities 


252 00 




Total expenditure 


$695 00 




Due Town from other cities $136 00 






Reimbursed by State 179 99 


315 99 








Net expenditure 


$379 01 




Unexpended 


120 99 






.$500 00 
OUSE 


$500 00 


RELIEF OUT OF ALMSH 




Appropriation, March 1, 1915 




$4700 00 


Paid out of almshouse 


$3903 02 




Paid other cities and towns 


349 70 




Paid State 


441 81 




Paid on account other cities and towns 


428 96 




Paid on account State 


225 98 




Total expenditure 


$5349 47 




Due Town from other cities 




■ 


and towns $428 96 






Due Town from State 225 98 


654 94 








Net expenditure 


$4694 53 




Unexpended 


5 47 





$4700 00 $4700 00 
63 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



Number of inmates — January 1, 1915 13 

Number admitted during year 5 

Number discharged 4 

Number remaining — January 1, 1916 14 

Number over eighty 2 

Number between seventy and eighty 6 

Number between sixty and seventy 3 

Number between fifty and sixty 1 

Number between twenty and thirty 1 

Number one year old 1 

Tramps fed 6 



FARM CASH REPORT 

Received for 

Cows and service of bull 

Milk 

Pork, pigs, and service of boar 

Boarding Johanna Buckley 



Paid 

For cows and calf 

To Town Treasurer to balance 



S174 


50 


75 


49 


117 


72 


202 


00 


S569 


71 


$143 


50 


426 


21 



S569 71 
FRED A. SWANTON, Superintendent 



64 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our 


annual report. 






Number of male polls assessed 






2038 


Real estate 




$6038425 


00 




Personal estate 




2764870 


00 










♦ocn^inc on 






<$~ 




Poll tax 




$ 4076 


00 




Tax on real estate 




114730 94 




Tax on personal estate 




52533 


14 


171340 08 


Rate of taxation per $1000 




S19 00 




Number of 








• 


Horses assessed 








643 


Cows assessed 








927 


Sheep assessed 








15 


Cattle other than cows 


assessed 




300 


Swine assessed 








271 


Fowl assessed 








14875 


Dwellings assessed 








1543 


Acres of land assessed 








18304 



HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Assessors of Andover 



65 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER 

Andover, Mass., Jan. 1, 1916 
To the Board of Selectmen, 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit to you the report . of the 
Board of Engineers of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1915. 

The working force of the Department consists of three 
Engineers, five permanent men, twenty-six call men, and ap- 
paratus as follows: one Combination Chemical and Hose, one 
Combination Pump, Chemical and Hose, one Fourth Class Fire 
Engine, one Two-horse Ladder Truck, one Two-horse Hose 
Wagon, one Two-horse Pung, one Two-horse Supply Wagon, 
and four horses. 

During the past year we have answered 94 bell alarms and 
11 still alarms. The automobiles have traveled 363 miles, laid 
3,915 feet of hose, raised 270 feet of ladders, and used 1,376 
gallons of chemicals. 

Value of buildings and contents where fires occurred $773700.00 
Insurance on buildings and contents 747300.00 

Damage to buildings and contents 1335.84 

One new Fire Alarm box has been installed on Summer Street. 
The alarm wires have been rehung on part of Salem Street, and 
the wires renewed on part of Park, Whittier and Summer Streets. 
There are about ten miles of wire which should be renewed this 
year, as some of it has been in service for about twenty-five 
years and is badly rusted. 

We will have to replace a Fire Alarm box on Maple Avenue 
(Box 57), the same having been destroyed by the current from 
electric wires passing through it when a large tree fell on to the 
trolley and electric light wires on Elm Street. We are now using 
a borrowed box there. 

66 



Owing to the necessary changes of telephone poles on Bartlet 
street we will have to put new wires on the upper end of Bartlet 
Street, also on Chapel Avenue, part of Main Street, and Salem 
Street. 

We have repaired the heating boiler at Ballardvale to meet 
the requirements of the Boiler Insurance Co., and it is now in 
good shape. One horse at Ballardvale having died, it will be 
necessary to buy another one. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY 

Two engine houses and sheds $23000 00 

Two motor trucks 14300 00 

One fourth-class fire engine 2800 00 

Three Harnesses 200 00 

One ladder truck 1000 00 

One Hose sled 60 00 

Fire alarm system 4500 00 

4,000 feet of hose 2000 00 

Two hose wagons 1000 00 

The increased pay voted the firemen last March will necessitate 
an increase in the appropriation. 

I would recommend $8700.00 for maintenance and necessary 
repairs, and S500.00 for new hose. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES S. BUCHAN 

Chief Engineer 



67 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



POLICE REPORT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 

Gentlemen: I hereby submit my report for the year ending 
December 31, 1915. 

OFFENCES FOR WHICH ARRESTS WERE MADE 

Assault 4 

Evading carfare 1 

Disturbance on street car 2 

Neglect to provide for child 2 

Vagrancy 2 

Delinquency 5 

Disturbance 8 

Threat to do bodily harm 1 

Insane 5 

Intent to rape 1 

Evading board bill 1 

Breaking Town ordinance 1 

Drunkenness 26 

Larceny 15 

Tramps 1 

Non-support 7 

Manslaughter 1 

Assault and battery 4 

Abuse of wife 4 

Bastardy 1 

Peddling without license 2 

Indecent assault 1 

Breaking game law 8 

Violation of motor vehicle laws 37 

Breaking and entering 1 

Abuse of wife 3 

Total 144 

68 



ARRESTS 

Males 136 

Females ° 

Whole number of arrests 144 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Appealed 5 

Continued 27 

Committed to State Farm 6 

Committed to Danvers 4 

Committed to House of Correction 8 

Discharged 23 

Held for Grand Jury 5 

Held for out-of-town officers 6 

Paid fines 32 

On probation 12 

On file 16 

Total I 44 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Paid fines in lower court $459 00 

,Paid fines in Superior Court 300 00 

Burglaries reported 12 

Dead bodies cared for 4 

Doors found open and secured 41 

Dogs killed 33 
Value of property stolen $2115 00 
Value of property recovered 1512 00 

Value of Police equipment 300 00 

SUPERIOR COURT FINDINGS 

Two and one-half years sentence 1 

One year and three months sentence 2 

On probation 2 

Fined in Superior Court 2 

69 



In conclusion I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen for 
their help and loyal support of the Police Department; also, 
the Police Officers for the many courtesies shown me and the 
strict attention to the many duties they are called upon to 
perform. 

I would at this time recommend an appropriation large 
enough to allow for one more officer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Chief of Police 



70 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Richardson schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 



Town House, fixtures and furniture 


$32000 00 




Engine house, storehouse and barn 


16000 


00 




25723 ft. land 


20000 


00 


$68000 00 








Memorial Hall 


25000 


00 




22318 ft. land 


10000 


00 


35000 00 


Engine house, Ballardvale 


3000 


00 


New shed 


200 


00 




1-3 acre land 


250 


00 


3450 00 


Almshouse 


12000 


00 


Barn and other buildings 


1500 


00 




311-2 acres land 


5000 


00 


18500 00 


Punchard schoolhouse 


28000 


00 


4 acres land 


8000 


00 


36000 00 


Heating plant and 






John Dove schoolhouse 


42000 


00 




Stowe schoolhouse 


24000 


00 




3 3-4 acres of land 


6000 


00 


72000 00 


Bradlee schoolhouse, Ballardvale 


14500 


00 


1 acre land 


500 


00 


15000 00 



5000 00 
400 00 



5400 00 



A mount carried forward 



71 



$253350 00 



Amount brought forward 

Indian Ridge schoolhouse 
1 acre land 

West Centre schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

North District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Abbott District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Bailey District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Osgood District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Old schoolhouse, Ballardvale 
1-4 acre land 



$253350 00 



$ 9600 00 
800 00 



3500 


00 


150 


00 


3500 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


25 


00 


1800 


00 


50 


00 


800 


00 


50 


00 


2500 


00 


500 


00 



10400 00 



3650 00 



3550 00 



125 00 



1850 00 



850 00 



9 acres, Indian Ridge (Gravel Pit) 






3000 00 
4000 00 


41 1-2 acres, Carmel Woods Reservation 






3600 00 


173,751 sq. ft. land, Central Park, 








(Richardson Field) 






10000 00 


6 1-2 acres Plays tead 






2000 00 


Bandstand 






1000 00 


Andover Board Public Works — 








Pipelines and fountains 


248000 


00 




Pumping-station and buildings 


42500 


00 




Coal shed 


700 


00 




3 acres land 


800 


00 




20 acres Boston Ice Co. land 


2500 


00 




2 reservoirs 


16000 


00 





Amount carried forward 



$ 310500 00 $297375 00 



72 



Amount brought forward 

4 1-2 acres land 
Machinery and tools 
Stone-breaker and engine 
Steam road roller 

2 sleds 
1 auto 

3 horses 

Carts and harnesses 
Sewer system 
Workshop, Lewis Street 
Barn and shed, Lewis Street 
47467 ft. land, Lewis Street 



$ 310500 00S297375 00 



Punchard School Fund 

Memorial Hall, Permanent Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Cornell 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Byers 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Edward Taylor 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Isaac E. Gid- 
dings Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, and furniture 

Memorial Hall Library, Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union 

Memorial Hall Library, Phillips Fund 

Personal property at Town Farm 
Motor Combination Chemical Truck 
Motor Combination Pump and Truck 
One Steam Fire Engine and apparatus 
Hook and Ladder Truck 

Amount carried forward 



2350 


00 






500 


00 






2000 


00 






1000 


00 






75 


00 






430 


00 






600 


00 






200 


00 






176000 


00 






1000 


00 






3000 


00 






3000 


00 










500655 


00 




798030 


00 






76454 


28 


$45000 00 







7700 00 



10000 00 



500 00 



3000 


00 


10000 


00 


100 


00 


3200 


00 




TQ^OO DO 




/ yyjKJKJ \J\J 

3575 20 




5300 00 




9000 00 




2800 00 




1000 00 




S975659 48 



73 



Amount brought forward 


$ 975659 48 


Two hose wagons 


1000 00 


Hose sled 


60 00 


Four horses 


1000 00 


Hay scales 


350 00 


Safes in Town House 


800 00 


41 1-2 acres land, Spring Grove Cem'y 


7500 00 


Receiving-tomb and toolhouse 


1500 00 




onnn no 


Weights and measures 


y\j\j\j uu 
350 00 


Fire Alarm apparatus 


4500 00 


4000 ft. hose 


2000 00 




$994719 48 



74 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 



During the past year fifty shade trees have been planted in 
various parts of the town. Dead trees have been removed when 
needed, and 150 trees have been trimmed and cemented in the 
residential part of the town. Considerable trouble has been 
experienced with electric wires, and we are having all the wires 
looked over and doing necessary trimming, which we hope will 
give good results, and we would ask that the sum of five hundred 
($500) dollars be appropriated for this department. 

J. H. PLAYDON 

Tree Warden 



75 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



In submitting my report on this department I am pleased to 
note that the Browntail Moth has greatly decreased during the 
past year, and I am firmly convinced that spraying is the most 
convenient way of handling these pests. There is considerable 
San Jose Scale around town on the fruit trees, and I would advise 
people owning these trees to have them examined and if the scale 
is found, spray with lime sulphur before the foliage starts, at the 
rate of 5 pounds of the solution to 50 gallons of water. Con- 
siderable roadside cutting has been done, and all the roadsides 
in West Andover have been trimmed out and some in the south 
part of the town. I would ask that the sum of three thousand 
($3000) dollars be appropriated for this department. 

J. H. PLAYDON 

Local Superintendent 



76 



SUPPRESSION OF BROWNTAIL AND GYPSY MOTHS 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 




$2750 00 


Private work 




2154 46 


Received from State Highway Department 

<• 




61 35 




$4965 81 


Fred Brundrett, labor 


S256 


21 


Harry Hayward, labor 


152 


28 


William Broderick, labor 


414 


83 


M. O'Connor, labor 


164 


11 


Frank Mealey, labor 


146 


92 


John Stewart, labor 


401 


46 


William Hatch, labor 


379 


24 


Edward Berry, labor 


290 


11 


J. Howard Baker, labor 


291 


69 


Pat Tucker, labor 


103 


06 


John Shevlin, labor 


6 


75 


Richard Stack, labor 


173 


80 


Benjamin B. Tuttle, labor 


6 


00 


M. Golden, labor 


9 


60 


Harry Greenwood, labor 


52 


50 


Jesse Hamilton, labor 


179 


51 


J. Wallace, labor 


19 


10 


F. Foster, labor 


2 


00 


F. McGhie, labor 


32 


88 


J. McGhie, labor 


20 


00 


N. E. Mears, labor 


38 


63 


Frank Connelly, labor 


8 


15 


J. Mears, labor 


8 


00 


Joe Maroney, labor 


17 


75 


Martin Doherty, labor 


24 


00 


M. Shea, labor 


9 


60 


J. H. Playdon, labor 


222 


00 


J. H. Playdon, use of horse 


62 


00 


Albert W. Lowe, supplies 




85 


Ira Buxton, repairs and supplies 


15 


17 



Amount carried forward $3508 20 

77 



Appropriation and Receipts $4965 81 

Amount brought forward 

S. T. Shattuck, teaming and storage 

Anderson & Bowman, repairs 

American Express Co. 

Treat Hardware Co., supplies 

Martin Doherty, storing sprayer 

Hardy & Cole, supplies 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, teams 

Freeman Abbott, hauling sprayer 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Grasseli Chemical Co., lead 

Morrison & O'Connell, repairs 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies and 

reapirs 
Buchan & McNally, supplies 
Comm. of Mass. Forestry Dept., tools 

and supplies 

Total expenditure 
Balance 

$4965 81 $4965 81 



$3508 


20 


138 


68 


4 


75 


1 


52 


6 


00 


24 


00 


2 


50 


76 


00 


230 


00 


27 


07 


25 


85 




50 


41 


67 


5 


17 


567 


83 


$4659 


74 


306 


07 



78 






RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
James Saunders 



$300 00 



$300 00 



Total expenditure 


$300 00 


$300 00 


BRUSH FIRES 




Appropriation, March 1, 1915 






$800 00 


Transferred from Miscellaneous 






235 90 


Chas. A. Hill et al 


$543 


50 




H. E. Wilcox, et al 


54 


25 




Joseph H. Dumont 


10 


00 




G. M. Carter, et al 


39 


75 




C. W. Flanders 


2 


55 




G. P. Anderson 


6 


50 




H. S. Neal, et al 


126 


50 




Norman Myatt, et al 


9 


00 




A. P. Wright, et al 


11 


00 




Charles L. Bailey 


4 


00 




W. H. Coleman & Co., chemicals, etc. 


82 


45 




Walter I. Morse, supplies 


37 


40 




Lester N. Towne 


3 


00 




S. T. Shattuck, team 


1 


50 




Leon O. Dyer, labor 


3 


00 




H. M. Gilman, et al 


67 


00 




Peter Myatt, et al 


3 


00 




T. F. Morrissey, team 


1 


50 




Peter Conroy 


2 


00 




George D. Ward, et al 


25 


50 




Elmer Shattuck 


2 


50 





Total expenditure 



$1035 90 $1035 90 



79 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen, 

Gentlemen: I hereby submit my report for the year be- 
ginning November 15, 1914, and ending November 15, 1915. 

Number of cattle inspected 476 

Number of cow-stables inspected 42 

Number of swine inspected 110 
Number of cattle condemned because affected with 

tuberculosis 53 
Number of interstate cattle held for test, and identified 

and released 158 

Number of cases of rabies 1 

Number of stables condemned and disinfected 36 

I wish to say that owing to the breaking out of the foot and 
mouth disease in the early part of February, 1915, inspection 
of cattle and stables was ordered discontinued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. NEWTON, 

Inspector of Animals 



80 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



During the past year your committee authorized the Super- 
intendent to prepare two plots of land in the cemetery for burial 
purposes. One of these plots is situated near the northwest 
corner of the cemetery between the tomb and the tool-house, the 
other at the southwest corner of the cemetery. This land has 
been plotted, staked and loamed, making available about sixty 
lots for sale. This takes up nearly all the available land on the 
west side of the Old Railroad bed. Before taking up work on the 
east side of the Old Railroad bed, it was deemed advisable by the 
committee to procure a comprehensive plan of the entire ceme- 
tery; the services of Horace Hale Smith, C. E., were obtained 
and such a plan has been completed, showing in detail the lay- 
out of the entire cemetery. This plan is on file with the Select- 
men for reference at any time. About two acres of land have 
been cleared of brush and in the near future considerable work 
will have to be done on the east side of the cemetery in line with 
its development for burial purposes. Each year adds to the area 
requiring labor and care on the part of the Superintendent and 
his assistants. The cemetery has at its present development 
about two miles of driveway and walks which require constant 
attention during the summer months to keep them in creditable 
condition. This together with the care of the vacant plots, 
shrubbery and trees calls for a larger outlay of money each 
season. For the coming year, your committee ask for the usual 
appropriation of $1000 and proceeds from the sale of lots. 

JOHN L. SMITH 
GEORGE W. FOSTER 
FELIX G. HAYNES 
OLIVER W. VENNARD 
GEORGE D. MILLETT 
JOHN W. BELL 
DANIEL H. POOR 

Cemetery Trustees 



Andover, Feb., 1916. 



81 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 



Lots sold as per last report 436 

Lots sold this year 8 



Total number of lots sojd 444 

Total number of single graves sold 158 

Interments as per last report 1168 

Interments this year 48 



Total number of interments 1216 

Respectfully submitted 

0. W. VENNARD, Supt. 



82 



CORNELL FUND 



RECEIVED 






Amount of Fund 




$5000 00 


Deposited in Savings Banks 




5000 00 


Balance from last year 


$ 25 37 




Dividends 


271 20 


296 57 



PAID 



Expended for coal and wood 
Balance on hand 


$237 10 
59 47 




»U>zyo oi 




JOHN C. ANGUS 
ALLAN SIMPSON 
W. D. WALKER 




Trustees 



83 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of Assessors: — 

I herewith hand you my report as Collector of Taxes for the 
year ending December 31, 1915. 



1910 



Amount as per warrant 
Additional to warrant 
Interest 
Collected taxes 
Collected interest 
Abated 



1911 



Amount as per warrant 
Additional to warrant 
Moth work 
Interest 
Collected taxes 
Collected moth work 
Collected interest 
Abated 





$ 308 67 




2 34 




23 42 


$115 23 




23 42 




195 78 




$334 43 


$334 43 





$662 47 




47 20 




2 88 




68 35 


312 69 




2 88 




68 35 




396 98 




$780 90 


$780 90 



84 



1912 



Amount as per warrant 
Additional to warrant 
Interest 
Moth work 
Street sprinkling 
Collected taxes 
Collected interest 
Collected moth work 
Collected street sprinkling 
Abated 



1913 



Amount as per warrant 

Additional to warrant 

Interest 

Moth work 

Street sprinkling 

Collected taxes 

Collected interest 

Collected moth work 

Collected street sprinkling 

Abated 

Uncollected 



1914 



Amount as per warrant 
Additional to warrant 
Interest 
Moth work 
Street sprinkling 

Amount carried forward 





$3317 37 




29 23 




456 51 




65 81 




15 69 


2674 65 




456 51 




65 81 




15 69 




671 95 




$3884 61 


$3884 61 




$8117 62 




130 10 




700 41 




202 92 




48 56 


$6845 80 




700 41 




202 92 




48 56 




486 64 




915 28 




$9199 61 


$9199 61 




$27069 93 




756 24 




600 69 




432 90 




161 50 




$29021 26 



85 



Amount brought forward 


$29021 26 


Collected taxes 


$18382 28 


Collected interest 


600 69 


Collected moth work 


432 90 


Collected street sprinkling 


161 50 


Abated 


436 40 


Uncollected 


9007 49 



$29021 26 $29021 26 



1915 



Amount as per warrant 






$171340 08 


Additional to warrant 






2130 49 


Bay State St. R.R. Excise tax 




2001 60 


Moth work 






1449 95 


Street sprinkling 






1227 99 


Interest 






91 84 


Collected taxes 




$145996 89 




Collected Bay State St. R. 


R. Excise 






tax 




2001 60 




Collected moth work 




1449 95 




Collected street sprinkling 




1227 99 




Collected interest 
Abated 




91 84 
457 53 




Uncollected 




27016 15 






$178241 95 $178241 95 



SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 







Excise 


Moth 


Street 




Taxes 


Tax 


Work 


Sprinkling j Interest 


Total 


1910 


£ 115 23 








£ 23 42 


£ 138 65 


1911 


312 69 




2 88 




68 35 383 92 


1912 


2674 65 




65 81 


15 69 


456 51 3212 66 


1913 


6845 80 




202 92 


48 56 


700 41 i 7797 69 


1914 


18382 28 


432 90 


161 50 


600 69 


19577 37 


1915 


145996 89 2001 60 


1449 95 


1227 99 


91 84 


150768 27 




£174327 54 £2001 60 


£2154 46 


£1453 74 


£1941 22 


£181878 56 



86 



JOHN W. BELL 

Collector of Taxes 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Liabilities 



Water Bonds, 4% (8000 due 1916) 


$120000 


00 


Water Bonds, 3^% (3000 due 1916) 


53000 


00 


Sewer Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1916) 


100000 


00 


And'r Loan Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1916) 


25000 


00 
<iii9QRonn no 






ty£yo\j\j\j yjyj 


Assets 






Cash, General Fund 


$21774 


28 


Cash, Water Department 


1543 


21 


Cash, Sewer Department 


15410 


33 

ft3£797 ft? 






(jpjO / Sj 1 oz. 


Uncollected Taxes 


$36938 92 


Street Sprinkling 


307 


23 


Moth Work 


533 


57 

<fc3777Q 7? 






«jf)v> i i i y / l 


Commonwealth, State Aid 


$ 1394 


00 


Commonwealth, Pauper Account 


225 


98 


Cities and Towns, Pauper Account 


428 


96 


Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 


136 


00 


Sewer Assessments 


430 


25 


Unpaid Water Rates of January 1 


5833 


60 


Sinking Funds 


47145 


57 






tyoooyT ovj 


Balance against Town 




165898 10 




$298000 00 



87 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 
Balance, January 1, 1915 
Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 
Commonwealth, Bank Tax 
Commonwealth, State Aid 
Commonwealth, St. Railway Tax 
Commonwealth, School Tuition 
Commonwealth, Industrial School 
Commonwealth, Burial of Soldiers 
Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 
Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 
Commonwealth, Highway Com., Moth Work 
Commonwealth, Highway Com., Lowell Street 
County of Essex, Lowell Street 
County of Essex, Dog Tax 
County of Essex, Killing Dogs 
Andover National Bank, Notes 
John W. Bell, Collector, Taxes 
John W. Bell, Collector, Interest on Taxes 
John W. Bell, Collector, St. Ry. Excise Tax 
John W. Bell, Collector, Street Sprinkling 
John W. Bell, Collector, Moth Work 
John W. Bell, Collector, Interest on Deposits 
Water Rates 

C. J. Stone, Trial Justice, Fees 
Wm. M. Rogers, Trial Justice, Fees 
Newton P. Frye, Trial Justice, Fees 
Almshouse, F. A. Swanton, Supt. 
Spring Grove Cemetery, O. W. Vennard, Supt. 
Town Hall Rents 

School Department, Tuition and Supplies 
Cities and Towns, Pauper Account 
Hay Scales 

G. A. Higgins, Town Clerk, Fees 
Andover Nat'l Bank, Interest on Deposits 

Amount carried forward 



$ 8927 48 

22633 97 

5296 08 

1322 00 

2021 75 

260 50 

23 75 

50 00 

5 63 

179 99 

61 35 

2000 00 

2000 00 
655 51 

36 00 

70000 00 

174327 54 

1941 22 

2001 60 
1453 74 
2154 46 

119 04 
22451 01 

23 00 
5 00 

15 00 
426 21 
280 50 
339 00 
415 83 
289 45 

80 40 
124 00 
640 92 

$322561 93 



88 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 



Orders paid 




Schools 


$ 41203 60 


School Houses 


2906 14 


Books and Supplies 


2472 94 


Lawrence Industrial School 


74 12 


High School Plans 


246 95 


Highways and Bridges 


36169 50 


Sidewalks 


2410 59 


Snow 


1112 21 


Parks 


1279 23 


New Barn 


1476 28 


Street Lighting 


5961 24 


Police 


4536 22 


Fire Department 


9866 75 


Brush Fires 


1035 90 


Printing and Stationery 


994 21 


Insurance 


1700 48 


Miscellaneous 


864 89 


Town House 


1486 73 


Town Officers 


6502 76 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


1261 04 


Board of Health 


1310 91 


Moth Work 


4659 74 


Tree Warden 


400 14 


Public Dump 


75 00 


Hay Scales 


122 83 


Interest on Notes and Bonds 


12696 18 


Redemption 11 Water Bonds 


11000 00 


Redemption 5 Andover Loan Act Bonds 


5000 00 


Maintenance, Water Department 


10000 00 


Construction, Water Department 


4500 00 


Maintenance, Sewer Department 


1800 00 


Sewer Sinking Funds 


1000 00 


Water Sinking Funds 


750 00 


Amount carried forward 


$176876 58 



89 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 

Dr. 



A mount brought forward 

Smart & Flagg, Agts., Insurance Dividends 

Ballard Vale Stores, Rent 

F. H. Stacey, Milk Licenses 

W. C. Crowley. Sealer's Fees 

Sidewalk Assessments 

Board of Public Works, Highway Department, 

Labor and Supplies 
Board of Public Works, Use of Horses 
Hawkers' Licenses 
Liquor Licenses 
Fireworks Licenses 

Est. J. W. Barnard, Moth Supplies and Labor 
Fire Department, sale of Manure and use of Cart 
Board of Health, slaughtering Licenses 



$322561 93 


130 


67 


166 


67 


9 


00 


45 


12 


466 


67 


1333 


83 


1052 


39 


78 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


6 


75 


23 


75 


4 


00 


$325882 


78 



90 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 

Amount brought forward 

Memorial Day 

Special G. A. R. Appropriation 

Memorial Hall Library 

Memorial Hall Library, Dog Tax 

Almshouse Expenses 

Almshouse Repairs 

Relief Out of Almshouse 

Soldiers' Relief 

State Aid 

Mothers' Aid 

Retirement of Veterans 

Commonwealth, State Tax 

Commonwealth, Bank Tax 

Commonwealth, State Highway 

Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 

County Tax 

Andover National Bank, Notes 

Total expenditure 

Balance on hand, January 1. 1916 



S176876 58 

350 00 

50 00 

1800 00 

655 51 

4742 21 

560 12 

5349 47 

705 70 

1394 00 

695 00 

300 00 

22132 50 

1644 00 

1376 47 

84 86 

15392 08 

70000 00 

S304108 50 
21774 28 



S325882 78 



91 



Water Department 

Dr. 

Balance, January 1, 1915 $ 1814 67 

Maintenance 10000 00 

Construction 4500 00 

Service Pipe 4376 79 

Andover Nat'l Bank, Int. on Deposits 9 81 



Cr. 

Orders paid 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1916 


$19158 06 
1543 21 



$20701 27 



$20701 27 



Sewer Department 
Dr. 



Maintenance 




$ 1800 00 




House Connections 




2594 51 




Sewer Assessments 




332 08 




Sewer Assessments Interest 




76 55 




Bonds 




7000 00 




Bonds Premium 




21 00 




Bonds Interest 




70 00 




Bonds 




60000 00 




Bonds Premium 




456 00 




Bonds Interest 




173 33 




Andover Nat'l Bank, Int. on 


Deposits 


347 19 

$ 


72870 66 



Cr. 

Orders paid $57036 65 

W. B. Hodgkins, Treas. Sinking Fund 408 63 

House Connections, Refund 15 05 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1916 15410 33 



92 



-$ 72870 66 



Richardson Fund — Frye Village School 

Dr. 

Balance, January 1, 1915 SI 165 38 

Andover Savings Bank, Interest 44 14 

$1209 52 

Cr. 

W. A. Allen S 82 00 

B. A. Wheeler 4 00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank, Jan. 1, 

1916 1123 52 

S1209 52 



Draper Fund 

Dr. 

Balance, January, 1915 S1085 93 

Andover Savings Bank, Interest 43 84 

$1129 77 

Cr. 

Geo. D. Millett S 6 10 

Emily F. Carleton 1 00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank, Jan. 1, 

1016 1122 67 

S1129 77 



Edward Taylor Fund 

Dr. 
Balance, January, 1915 S 220 47 



Andover Savings Bank, Interest 


8 88 




C Tin ?r 




\> ZZV oo 


Cr. 




Deposit, Andover Savings Bank, Jan. 1, 




1916 


229 35 




$ 229 3> 



93 



Varnum Lincoln Spelling Fund 

Dr. 
Balance, January, 1915 $ 521 00 

And over Savings Bank, Interest 20 24 



Cr. 

J. F. Allison, Supt. of Schools $ 20 00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank, Jan. 1, 

1916 521 24 



Isaac E. Giddings Burial Ground Fund 



Dr. 
Balance, January, 1915 
Andover Savings Bank, Interest 

Cr. 

F. L. Brigham, Treas., South Cemetery 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank, Jan. 1, 
1016 



Cemetery Funds 

Dr. 
Balance, January, 1915 
Interest, Andover Savings Bank 
Deposits for Perpetual Care 
Andover National Bank Stock 
Andover National Bank Dividends 
Cash 



$1000 00 
40 40 



$ 40 40 



1000 00 



$14852 10 

609 30 

875 00 

200 00 

12 00 

48 00 



$ 541 24 



541 24 



$1040 40 



$1040 40 



Cr. 




Paid for Care of Lots 


$ 592 00 


Deposits, Andover Savings Bank 


15752 40 


Andover National Bank Stock 


200 00 


Cash 


52 00 



$16596 40 



$16596 40 



94 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several Town Officers 
and find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all 
payments. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in the Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand, $21,774.28. 

Also, to the credit of the Water Department, $1,543.21 ; Sewer, 
$15,410.33. 

NESBIT G. GLEASON 
WALTER H. COLEMAN 
DAVID R. LAWSON 

A uditors 



95 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 

COMMITTEE 



The following is a list of appropriations recommended by 
the Finance Committee for 1916. 

Almshouse Expenses 

Repairs on Almshouse 

Relief out of Almshouse 

Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 

Board of Health 

Brush Fires 

Fire Department, running expenses and new hose 

Hay Scales 

Highway Department, Sidewalks, Snow 

Also Street Railway Tax and Street Sprinkling 

(amounting last year to $5477.09) 
Insurance 

Insurance under Workmen's Compensation Act 
Interest 

Memorial Hall Library 
Memorial Day 
Post 99, G. A. R. 
Miscellaneous 
Parks and Playsteads 
Police 

Printing and Stationery 
Public Dump 

Retirement of Veterans, Acts 1912 
Redemption of Water Bonds 
Redemption Andover Loan Act Bonds 
Redemption Abbott Village Sewer Bonds 
Schools 

Amount carried forward 



$ 4200 


00 


450 


00 


4300 


00 


500 


00 


2000 


00 


800 


00 


9200 


00 


125 


00 


28000 


00 


950 


00 


1600 


00 


13000 


00 


1800 


00 


350 


00 


100 


00 


1700 


00 


1500 


00 


4500 


00 


1150 


00 


75 


00 


300 


00 


11000 


00 


5000 


00 


4505 


67 


47000 


00 


$144105 


67 



96 



Amount brought forward 


$144105 67 


Sewer Department 




Maintenance 


1800 00 


Sinking Funds 


1000 00 


Soldiers' Relief 


900 00 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


1000 00 


And receipts from sale of lots 




State Aid 


1500 00 


Street Lighting 


6500 00 


Town Officers 


6650 00 


Town House 


2000 00 


Tree Warden and Gypsy and Browntail Moth 




Department 


3500 00 


Water Department 




Maintenance 


11000 00 


Construction 


1500 00 


Sinking Funds 


750 00 


Total 


$182205 67 


Estimated County Tax 


16000 00 


Estimated State Tax 


23500 00 




S221705 67 



The Finance Committee is also required to make recom- 
mendations to the voters in regard to all Articles in the Town 
Warrant involving the expenditure of money. The Committee, 
therefore makes the following recommendations: 



Article 


4. 


Article 


5. 


Article 


6. 


Article 


7. 


Article 


8. 


Article 


9. 



Approved. 

Approved. Appropriation not to exceed $350. 
Referred to Board of Public Works. 
Referred to Board of Public Works. 
Referred to Board of Public Works. 
Approved. Sum not to exceed $5000. 

97 



Article 10. Report and Recommendation approved. 

Article 11. Referred to Lighting Committee. 

Article 12. Referred to Lighting Committee. 

Article 13. Referred to Board of Public Works. 

Article 14. Recommended. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
SAMUEL H. BAILEY 
JOHN H. CAMPION 
HENRY A. BODWELL 
JOSEPH L. BURNS 
SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL 
GEORGE ABBOT 
WALTER M. LAMONT 
THOMAS E. RHODES 

Finance Committee 



98 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, SS.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the sixth day of March, 1916, 
at 6 o'clock A.M., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, 
one member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three 
members of the School Committee for three years, five Trustees 
of the Punchard Free School for three years, two members of 
the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the 
Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for 
one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year, one 
Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, seven Trustees of 
Spring Grove Cemetery for three years, Fence Viewers, Pound 
Keeper, and any other officers the town may determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be ap- 
propriated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, 
Relief out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent 
Children, Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay 
Scales, Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial 
Hall Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, 
Parks and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public 

99 



Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water, Sewer, 
and Andover Loan Bonds, Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer 
Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State 
Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, 
Moth Department, Water Maintenance, Construction and Sink- 
ing Funds, and other town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will accept the provisions of 
Sections 1,2, and 4, and the eight following sections of Chapter 
655, Acts of 1913, and appoint a committee of five (5) to be 
known as the Committee on Building Laws, said committee 
to submit a printed report to the voters on or before March 1, 
1917. That the sum of $25 be appropriated for the expenses of 
said committee, upon petition of the Selectmen. 

Article 5. — To see if the town will appropriate money for a 
fire alarm box to be located on South Main Street, near Gould 
Road, on petition of Harry W. Hayward and others. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of two 
thousand ($2000) dollars for the extension of the macadam road 
on Salem Street and Jenkins Road, on petition of Everett W. 
Ricker and others. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will appropriate $3500 to 
macadam River Road from Martin Lydon's to Fish Brook and 
repair the River Road to the Tewksbury line, on petition of 
Samuel H. Boutwell and others. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will appropriate $1000 to repair 
Bailey Road to Tewksbury line, Pleasant Street to Boutwell 
Road, and Boutwell Road to River Road, on petition of James E. 
Dodge and others. 

Article 9. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$5000 to macadam Lowell Street, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 10. — To hear the report of the Special Committee, 
appointed March, 1915, relative to the erection of a new high 
school building, and to act upon its recommendations as fol- 
lows : — That the town shall vote to raise and appropriate the 

100 



sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) for the purpose 
of building and equipping a new high school building to be lo- 
cated on land in front of the present Punchard School building; 
to make any changes deemed necessary to preserve and use the 
present Punchard School building; and to make any necessary 
changes in the Central Heating Plant and its connections. 

That for the purpose of building and equipping said new high 
school building the Town Treasurer is hereby authorized to issue 
and sell bonds of the town to an amount not exceeding $100,000, 
dated October 1, 1916, and payable $5000 thereof on the first 
of October in each of the years 1917-1936 inclusive, bearing in- 
terest at a rate not exceeding 4 per cent per annum payable 
semi-annually. The said bonds shall be denominated on their 
face Andover High School Loan 1916. 

That the Moderator appoint a committee of five in number 
to be known as the High School Building Committee, said 
committee to be authorized and instructed to obtain plans, 
make contracts, approve payments, and to do and act as may be 
necessary and proper to carry out all provisions of the foregoing 
vote. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money to extend the street lighting system up Prospect Hill 
Road, on petition of George M. Garland and others. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will vote to change the light 
now at the foot of Bancroft Road and Main Street to pole on 
opposite side of Bancroft Road, also place a new light opposite 
pumping station on Bancroft Road, on petition of Fred E. 
Cheever and others. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will vote to extend the water 
system on Bellevue Road from the Osgood Schoolhouse to the 
Boston & Maine track, a distance of about 2800 feet, on petition 
of Fred T. Harrington and others. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will vote to accept the Boulders 
so-called, near the Boston & Maine station, as a part of the Park 
system of the Town of Andover. 

101 



Article 15. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year. 

Article 16. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 17. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 18. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 19. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 20. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 21. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock a.m., and may be closed 
at 2 o'clock p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting, as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, 
A.D. 1916. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of Andover 



102 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Rev. E. VICTOR BIGELOW MYRON E. GUTTERSON 
Rev. C. W. HENRY HARRY H. NOYES 

Rev. NEWMAN MATTHEWS HARRY M. EAMES 
S. H. BOUTWELL FRANK T. CARLTON 

Trustees 



103 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



1915 


PRINCIPAL 


FUND 








January 1st 














Cash in Bank 






$ 


465 


53 




Real Estate, M< 


Drtgages 


and Bonds 


75988 


75 
















$76454 28 



December 31st 

Real Estate, Mortgages and Bonds $75988 75 
Cash in Bank 465 53 



January 1st 




Cash on hand 


$ 465 53 


Mortgage paid during year 


1350 00 


December 31st 




Invested in new Mortgage 


$1350 00 


Cash on hand 


465 53 


INCOME 




January 1st 




Cash on hand 


$1231 19 


Interest on Mortgage and Bonds 


3974 57 


EXPENDITURES 




N. C. Hamblin, Principal 


$ 800 00 


Edna G. Chapin, instructor 


850 00 


Caroline M. Davis, instructor 


560 00 


Helen M. Dunn, instructor 


815 00 


Percival M. Symonds, instructor 


240 00 


Travel — N. C. Hamblin 


8 51 


Andover Nat'l Bank, security box 


5 00 


Harry H. Noyes, treasurer 


200 00 


Postage and Stationery 


1 75 


Expense 


10 57 


Rogers & Angus, insurance 


25 00 


Balance 


1689 93 



$76454 28 



$1815 53 



$1815 53 



$5205 76 



$5205 76 



104 



BARNARD FUND 



January 1st 

Cash on hand 
Dividends 



Prizes awarded 
First Prize 



Eldred W. Larkin 
Second Prize — Gertrude W. Berry 
Third Prize — William R. Brewster 
Cash on hand 



$ 


25 


50 




40 


00 


$ 


20 


00 




12 


00 




8 


00 




25 


50 



$ 65 50 



$ 65 50 



DRAPER FUND 



January 1st 

Cash on hand 
Dividends 



$1308 74 

52 84 



GOLDSMITH FUND 


January 1st 




Cash on hand 


$ 251 86 


Dividends 


10 14 


Prizes awarded 




Girl's Prize — Marian E. Matthews 


$ 5 00 


Boy's Prize — Herbert W. Holt 


5 00 


Cash on hand 


252 00 



$1361 58 



$ 262 00 



$ 262 00 



HARRY H. NOYES 

Treasurer 



Examined and found correct. 



FRANK T. CARLTON 
HARRY M. EAMES 

A uditors 



105 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The Trustees hereby submit to the Town their annual Report 
for 1915, together with the complete Report of the Librarian. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
C. C. CARPENTER 
JOHN ALDEN 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
GEORGE F. SMITH 
BURTON S. FLAGG 

Trustees 
Andover, Feb. 19, 1916 



106 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
In account with the Town of ANDOVER, MASS. 



RECEIPTS 



Balance from last year 

Town appropriation 

Dog tax 

Income from investments 

Fines 

Gifts 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 

Lighting and heating 

Periodicals 

Bookbinding 

Books 

New heating plant 

Fire escape 

Repairs 

Typewriter 

Sundry items 

Cash on hand 



$ 4447 


79 


1800 


00 


655 


51 


3114 


96 


143 


07 


17 


20 


$10178 53 


$ 3318 59 


468 


85 


173 


65 


251 


39 


718 


64 


945 


00 


448 


00 


196 


81 


50 


00 


195 


01 


3412 


59 


$10178 53 



In the above statement of expenditures is included the cost of 
maintaining the Ballard vale Branch Library, which, itemized, 
is as follows : — 



Running expenses, salaries, etc. 

Lighting and heating 

Books 



$202 98 


20 


80 


103 


90 



$327 68 



107 



Statement of Income and Expenses of the Trustees of Memorial 
Hall Library for the Year Ending January 20, 1916 





INCOME 










Maint. 


Books 


Cornell 


Total 


Income from investments 


#2140 48 


#748 58 


#225 90 


#3114 96 


Town appropriation 


1800 00 






1800 00 


Dog tax 


655 51 






655 51 


Gifts 


2 20 


15 00 




17 20 


Fines 


140 54 


2 53 




143 07 


Total 


#4738 73 


#766 11 


#225 90 


#5730 74 




EXPENDITURES 






Salaries 


#3216 93 




#101 66 


#3340 59 


Lighting and heating 


370 06 




98 79 


446 85 


Books, periodicals, etc. 


"173 65 


718 64 




892 29 


Bookbinding 


251 39 






251 39 


New heating plant 


945 00 






945 00 


Fire escape 


448 00 






448 00 


Typewriter 


50 00 






50 00 


Repairs 


196 81 






196 81 


Sundry items 


195 01 






105 01 


Total 


#5846 85 


#718 64 


#200 45 


#6765 94 


Unexpended income 


*1108 12 


47 47 


25 45 


*1035 20 


* Deficit for one year. 











Condition of Funds and Unexpended Income on hand Jan. 20, 1916 

Funds Unex. Inc. 

Maintenance Fund 
Book Funds (general) 
Book Funds (special) 
Cornell Fund (permanent) 
Cornell Fund (purchase) 
Special 



#46600 00 


#1208 90 


13600 00 


338 28 


3200 00 


305 62 


5000 00 


183 35 


2700 00 


1170 35 




64 94 


#71100 00 


#3271 44 



The unexpended income on hand from the Cornell purchase fund, owing 
to the crowded condition of the building, cannot be used. The Trustees have 
therefore decided to reinvest #1000. 



108 



INVESTMENTS 



Bangor & Aroostook R.R. 4s 

Boston Elevated Railway Co., 4s 

Chicago Railways Co., 5s 

Montreal Tramways Co., 5s 

Michigan State Tel. Co., 5s 

Boston & Maine R.R., 4s 

Boston & Albany R.R. Co. Equip. Trust, 43^s 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 

Mortgage 

Savings Banks 

Am. Tel. & Tel. Co., 4 shares 

Principal Cash 

Total 

Income cash on hand 

Principal cash on hand 

Total 



$11000 00 

10000 00 

9962 50 

9962 50 

4981 25 

2000 00 

2981 10 

1000 00 

4000 00 

13500 00 

571 50 

141 15 

$71100 00 

3271 44 

141 15 

$3412 59 



FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL, Treasurer 



We certify that we have examined and found correct the 
above statements as of January 20, 1916, whereby all securities 
held against the several funds have been examined and the 
income accruing from same accounted for. 

All disbursements are supported by receipts in proper form 
and the cash on deposit as shown has been verified and found 
correct. 

BURTON S. FLAGG 
GEO. F. SMITH 

Auditors 



109 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the library for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1915. 

The circulation for the year is 41637 books as compared with 
41130 for 1914. This increase is due to larger use of the main 
library since the number of volumes issued at Ballardvale is less 
than last year, 7582 instead of 7992. This decrease was to be 
expected, since the use of a branch when first opened is almost 
always larger than the normal level which it afterwards reaches. 
The present circulation is good in proportion to the population 
of Andover, 5.7 books per capita. 

Two important changes were made in the Memorial Hall 
during the year; the addition of a fire escape as required by the 
state law, and the equipping of the building with steam heat. 
To have the furnaces that had been in commission for over forty 
years removed and an adequate heating plant installed was 
greatly appreciated by all who use the library. The change 
from a temperature at best around 60 and often lower, where 
no proper ventilation was possible, to conditions where plenty 
of fresh air can be supplied and the library still be perfectly 
comfortable, is an improvement that calls forth constant appre- 
ciative comment and is doubtless a factor in the increased use. 
Not one criticism of the ventilation has been made this season 
and people who complained bitterly in the past, now occupy 
the reading-room in comfort. The only regret is that the plant 
should be installed in a place so plainly inadequate for the needs 
of the library, but the new boiler is capable of heating a larger 
building when we have the addition so much needed. 

The reference use of the library continues large, particularly 
by the schools. Did space only permit, we should duplicate 
many books especially wanted by the children, but we have 
no place to put them. Students are naturally exasperated when 
we can provide only one or two copies of a book for the use of 
a class of thirty. Other libraries with adequate accommodations 

110 



solve this problem satisfactorily by purchasing "school dupli- 
cates", but as has been repeatedly said, the Andover library 
can never do what it has in its power to do, or be what it might 
be to the schools and to the town, until it has more room. 

The four travelling libraries purchased last year for the out- 
lying schools have been appreciated. The school department 
has attended to their transportation and assumed responsibility 
for their safety. They were composed of one hundred different 
books proved by experience to be liked and enjoyed by children. 

An unusually large number of books were withdrawn during 
the year because they had been in houses where scarlet fever or 
diphtheria developed. Such cases are reported to us at once by 
the Board of Health, and it is our invariable custom to destroy 
any volume that has been exposed to possible contagion, even 
when, as occurred this year in several instances, the books were 
perfectly new. The library prefers to bear this loss in order that 
parents may be confident that all proper precautions are taken. 

We have received from different people gifts of books and 
pamphlets. From the estate of George H. Torr came a number 
of books which were of use both in the main library and at 
Ballard vale. There was also an unusual and valuable portrait 
engraving of Lincoln. Mr. George Ripley has presented both 
library and branch with a quantity of helpful and inspiring 
literature. Another interesting addition is a large assortment 
of books and pamphlets relating to the European war, presented 
by Sir Gilbert Parker. 

In regard to the immense amount of war literature flooding 
the market, our purchases have been most conservative. The 
few books we have bought are those possessing a certain value 
of human interest, such as Kreisler's "Four weeks in the 
trenches," Aldrich's "Hill-top on the Marne," or Wister's 
wonderful "Pentecost of Calamity." Believing that our readers 
obtain from daily papers and current magazines all they want 
of war conditions, we have avoided fiction, particularly all 
juvenile fiction, based on the present conflict. There is not the 
usual demand for stories of exciting adventure; actual life is 
affording sufficient variety for all but the most hardened novel- 
readers. Instead, people are asking for quiet stories, of home 

111 



life or character study rather than fiction. There is a remarkable 
demand for the older English novelists, Trollope, Thackeray, 
Bronte, and Dickens. People are turning to them as a relief 
from the strain of world war. 

The branch at Ballardvale shows enthusiastic use. It has now 
1011 volumes belonging to it. Much of its success is due to its 
librarian, Miss Byington, whose personal interest and knowledge 
of the village form a big factor in its popularity. While the 
percentage of fiction circulated is large, it need not be deplored, 
for part of the branch's reason for existence is to bring to the 
children and the older people, clean, wholesome, recreative 
reading. Miss Byington reports that additional shelving will 
be required this coming spring. Fortunately there is ample 
wall space. Ballardvale also wishes to have the immediate 
approach to the building made more attractive, levelled and 
planted with grass. The estimate obtained shows that needed 
loam, work, etc. will cost about seventy-five dollars. Since 
the presence of the library in the building is the cause of the 
village interest to have the vicinity improved, it is hoped that 
the change may be made possible at the coming town meeting. 

Our own cramped quarters have forced us this year to request 
the discontinuance of such government publications as the 
Congressional Record, Patent Office gazette, and other valuable 
documents which have been sent us free for years. Not until 
the town, or somebody who cares to do something for the town, 
makes possible the addition needed to the present building, will 
the Memorial Hall Library be able to offer the very high type of 
library service that might be enjoyed by the community of 
Andover. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDNA A. BROWN 

Librarian 



112 



STATISTICS OF THE LIBRARY 

Jan. 1, 1915 -Dec. 31, 1915 

Number of books issued for home use at Memorial Hall, 34055 

Number issued at Ballardvale, 7582 

Total, 41637 

Percentage of fiction circulated, 70 

Percentage of non-fiction circulated, 30 

Xew borrowers registered, 1915, 300 

Actual number of cards in use, 2377 

Books added by purchase, 722 

Books added by gift, 122 

Total accessions, 844 

Books withdrawn, worn out, etc., 158 

Total number of books in library, 22503 

Volumes rebound, 300 

Volumes bound, periodicals, etc., 75 

BALLARDVALE 

• 

Number of books issued for home use, 7582 

Percentage of fiction, 87 

Percentage of non-fiction, 13 

Number of cards in use, 330 

Books added during 1915, 177 

Books now belonging to branch, 1011 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

Gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from state 
and government departments, from other libraries, from societies, 
the Andover Village Improvement Society; and from the following 
individuals: 

Mrs. J. N. Ashton; C. K. Bancroft; E. T. Brewster; Miss 
Martha Byington; C. C. Carpenter; J. H. Flint; W. D. Foulke; 
F. M. Hueffer; W. K. Moorehead; O. W. Norton; Miss Agnes 
Park; Mrs. George Ripley; G. B. Ripley; M. W. Stackpole; 
Mrs. J P. Taylor; G. H. Torr; and F. W. Whitridge. 

113 



LIST OF PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS TAKEN FOR THE 

READING ROOM 

American monthly review of reviews. 

Atlantic monthly. 

Blackwood's magazine. 

Bookman. 

Book review digest. 

Catholic world. 

Century. 

Country gentleman. 

Christian Endeavor world, (gift). 

Country life in America. 

Craftsman. 

Cumulative book index. 

Education. 

Elementary school journal. 

Etude. 

Forum. 

Garden magazine, (gift). 

Guide to nature, (gift). 

Harper's magazine. 

House beautiful, (gift). 

Independent. 

International studio, (gift). 

Ladies' home journal. 

Library journal. 

Life. 

Literary digest. 

Littell's living age. 

London weekly Times. 

Missionary review of the world. 

Nation. 

National geographic magazine. 

Nineteenth century. 

North American review. 

Outing. 

Outlook. 

Popular mechanics. 

114 



Practical engineer. 

Public libraries. 

Punch, (gift). 

Readers' guide to periodical literature. 

St. Nicholas. 

School arts magazine. 

Scientific American. 

Scribner's magazine. 

Something to do. 

Survey. 

Woman's Home Companion. 

World's work. 

Youth's companion. 

Andover Townsman. 

Boston Advertiser. 

Boston Herald. 

Boston Transcript. 

Christian Science Monitor, (gift). 

Lawrence Telegram. 

New York Times. 



115 



INFORMATION FOR USERS OF THE LIBRARY 

The Memorial Hall Library is open every day except Sundays 
and legal holidays from 9 to 12.30 in the morning, and from 3 to 
9 in the afternoon and evening. 

Any resident of Andover over ten years of age may have a 
library card upon filling out an application blank. Children in 
grades below the Punchard School, are required to have their 
applications endorsed by both teacher and parent. 

All grown people are allowed to take two books, provided 
that one only is fiction. This privilege is also given to the 
Punchard pupils. Teachers are permitted to draw ten books 
strictly for school use. These books are subject to the ordinary 
rules of the library. 

Books are issued for fourteen days, the date upon which the 
book is due being stamped plainly on the ''date due" slip at the 
time of issue. A book kept overtime incurs a fine of two cents 
for every day overdue. A few of the books most in demand are 
issued for seven days only. All these are labeled upon the book 
pocket, "Seven day book". Books lost or damaged must be 
paid for. 

Seven day books are not renewed or reserved for anyone. 
Other books may be renewed if no one else has asked for them, 
and if a work not fiction, is especially desired for any serious 
purpose, notice of its return to the library will be sent on request. 

The shelves of the whole library are open to all grown people. 
The books are arranged according to subjects, and it is often 
much more satisfactory to go to the shelves and examine the 
books than to depend upon the catalogue. 

The only complete index of the contents of the library is the 
card catalogue. The printed catalogue of the books was issued 
years ago, and is out-of-date, besides containing the names 
of many books which are no longer in the library. The new books 
are listed at intervals in the weekly paper, and cumulated in the 
yearly library' report, but the only complete record is the card 
catalogue. This catalogue is arranged alphabetically like a 
dictionary. To find whether any given book is in the library, 
look for it under the surname of the author, or under its title. 
The right hand drawers of the case contain a second arrange- 

116 



ment of cards where the books are entered according to the sub- 
jects of which they treat. 

The new books purchased each month are placed for some 
weeks in a special case on the north side of the reading room, 
so that the most recent additions to the library may be found 
there. The library buys only a limited amount of new fiction, 
but it tries to fill the wants of the community in regard to other 
books desired. People are invited to suggest for purchase the 
titles of books they wish. 

The library staff is always glad to answer questions or in any 
way to help visitors find what they want. 



117 



NEW BOOKS ADDED IN 1915 



State and government documents, such as the Massachusetts Acts and Re- 
solves, Manual of the General Court, etc., and annual reports regularly received 
and kept in the library for reference are not listed. Duplicates purchased 
for Ballardvale, or replacements are also not included. 



808 B28 
374B87e 

374 B87s 
266 D66e 
031 E93 
203 H28 

970.1 H66 
603 H77 

374J92g 

353 M22 

370.9 M92 
374 M82f 
031 N42 
913.38 P33 

374P51m 

374P51r 
374 R53r 
317.3 U58s 



GENERAL REFERENCE BOOKS 

Bartlett, John, comp. Familiar quotations. New ed. 
Bullock, E. D. Selected articles on the employment of 
women. 

Bullock, E. D. comp. Selected articles on the single tax. 
Dwight, H. O. ed. Encyclopedia of missions. 
Everyman's encyclopedia. 12v. 

Hastings, James, ed. Encyclopedia of religion and 
ethics, v. 7. 

*Hodge, F. W. ed. Handbook of American Indians. 2v. 
Hopkins, A. A. ed. Scientific American encyclopedia of 
formulas. 

Judson, K. B. comp. Selected articles on government 
ownership of telegraph and telephone. 
McLaughlin & Hart, ed. Cyclopedia of American govern- 
ment. 3v. 

Monroe, Paul, ed. Cyclopedia of education, v. 3-5. 
Morgan, J. E. comp. Free trade and protection. 
New international encyclopedia, v. 1-16. New ed. 
Peck, H. T. ed. Harper's dictionary of classical literature 
and antiquities. 

Phelps, E. M. comp. Selected articles on the Monroe 
doctrine. 

Phelps, E. M. comp. Selected articles on the recall. 
Robbins, E. C. comp. Selected articles on reciprocity. 
*U.S.-Census bureau. Statistical atlas of the United 
States. 



051 R32 
071 A552 
051 A881 

052 B56 

051 B64 

052 E21 
370.5 E25 
370.5 E39 

♦Gifts 



PERIODICALS 

American monthly review of reviews, v. 50, 51. 

Andover Townsman, v 27. 

Atlantic monthly, v. 114, 115. 

Blackwood's Edinburgh magazine, v. 196. 

Bookman, v. 41. 

Edinburgh review, v. 219-220. 

Education, v. 35. 

Elementary school teacher, v. 15. 



118 



051 F77 Forum, v. 52, 53. 

051 H23 Harper's magazine, v. 130. 

705 H81 *House beautiful, v. 36, 37. 

051 138 Independent, v. 77-82. 

705 161 international studio, v. 54, 55. 

020.5 L61 Library journal, v. 39. 

051 L71 Littell's living age, v. 279-286. 
071 N21 Nation, v. 97-100. 

910.5 N21 National geographic magazine, v. 26, 27. 

052 N62 Nineteenth century, v. 76, 77. 

051 N81 North American review, v. 200, 201. 

799.5 094 Outing, v. 66. 

051 094 Outlook, v. 108-110. 

621 P81 Popular mechanics, v. 22, 23. 

505 P81 Popular science monthly, v. 85, 86. 

605 S416 Scientific American, v. Ill, 112. 

051 S434 Scribner's magazine, v. 56, 57. 

305 S96 Survey, v. 32. 

ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS BOOKS 
(Purchased chiefly from the Phillips Fund) 

248 A13 Abbott, Lyman. Letters to unknown friends. 

252 A131 *Abbott, Lyman. Life that really is. 

126 B65 Bosanquet, Bernard. Principle of individuality and 

value. 

230 B95 Burton, M. L. Our intellectual attitude in an age of 

criticism. 

288 C77 *Cooke, G. W. Unitarianism in America. 

174 D29 Davis, J. B. Vocational and moral guidance. 

109 E86 Eucken, Rudolph. Problem of human life. 

266 F27 Faunce, W. H. P. Social aspects of foreign missions. 

173 F74 Forbush, W. B. Boy problem in the home. 

170 G45 Gladden, Washington. Live and learn. 
244 G86p *Grenfell, W. T. Prize of life. 

230 H24 Harris, George. Century's changes in religion. 

270. 1 H66 Hodges, George. Early church from Ignatius to Augustine. 
283 H66 Hodges, George. The Episcopal church. 

274.2 L71 Littell, J. S. Historians and the English reformation. 
288 M36 *Martineau, James. Studies of Christianity. 

174 P14 Page, E. D. Trade morals. 

171 P31 Peabody, F. G. Christian life in the modern world. 
220.9 S21h Sanders, F. K. History of the Hebrews. 

248 S63 *Slattery, Margaret. Girl and her religion. 

248 S63p *Slattery, Margaret. Girl's book of prayers. 

261 S63 *Slattery, Margaret. He took it upon himself. 

244 S63s *Slattery, Margaret. The seed, the soil, and the sower. 

119 



^97 Switzer, Maurice. Letters of a self-made failure. 

9 T66 Towns, C. B. Habits that handicap. 

221.8 W64 Wild, L. H. Geographic influences in Old Testament 

masterpieces. 
252 W89 Worcester, Elwood. Religion and life. 

GENERAL ECONOMICS 

647 B24 Barker, C. H. Wanted : a young woman to do housework. 

361 B49 Billington, M. F. Red Cross in war. 

396 B5 ; *Bjorkman & Porritt, ed. Woman suffrage. 

2 Cll Cabot, E. L & others. Course in citizenship. 

396 C27 Cass, A. H. Practical programs for women's clubs. 

338.5 C54 Clark, W. E. Cost of living. 

351.8 D92 Du Puy, W. A. Uncle Sam's modern miracles. 

396 G63 *Goodwin, G. D. Anti-suffrage. 

359 N29 Neeser, R. W. Our navy and the next war. 

330 P42 Perris, G. H. Industrial history of modern England. 

658 S43 Scott, W. D. Increasing human efficiency in business. 

659 S43 Scott, W. D. Psychology of advertising. 

174 W Weaver & Byler. Profitable vocations for boys. 

174 W84 Women's municipal league. Handbook of opportunities 

for vocational training in Boston. 

BOOKS ON EDUCATION 

(Purchased from the Phillips Fund for Books for Teachers) 

371.5 B14 Bagley, W. C. School discipline. 
572.2 B15s Bailey, C. S. For the story teller. 
371.7 C94 Curtis, H. S. Education through play. 

371.6 D58 Dillaway, T. M. Decoration of the school and home. 

372 D65 Dobbs, E. Y. Primary handwork. 

396 E 14 Eaton & Stevens. Commercial work and training for 

girls. 

378 F55 Fitch, A. P. College course and the preparation for life. 

_.5F87 Freeman, F.N. Teaching of handwriting. 

378 G23 Gauss, Christian, ed. Through college on nothing a year. 

353 H55 Hill, Mabel. Teaching of civics. 

028.5 L95 Lowe, Orton. Literature for children. 

808.9 042 Olcott, F. J. ed. Good stories for great holidays. 

371 P18t Palmer, G. H. Trades and professions. 

634.9 P65t Pinchot, Gifford. Training of a forester. 

373 S24 Sargent, P. E. comp. Handbook of the best private 

schools. 
808.9 S62 Skinner, A. M. ed. Little folks' Christmas stories and 

plays. 
808.9 S64 Smith & Hazeltine, comp. Christmas in legend and 

stories. 

120 



371.9 W27 nVashington, B. T. Tuskegee. 

371.9 VV93 Wright, J. D. What the mother of a deaf child ought to 

know. 

NATURE BOOKS 

598.2 B34 Baynes, E. H. Wild bird guests. 

580 C83 Cowles & Coulter. Spring flora for high schools. 

582 M43s Mathews, F. S. Field book of American trees and shrubs. 

570 P31 Peabody & Hunt. Elementary biology. 

580 W15 Wallace, Alexander. Heather in lore, lyric and lay. 

BOOKS FOR THE HOME AND FARM 

646 B43 Ben Yusef, Anna. Art of millinery. 

640 B75 Brewster, E. T. & L. Nutrition of a household. 
630 C88 Crow, M. F. American country girl. 

636.5 F24 Farrington, E. I. Home poultry book. 

635 G92 Grubb & Guilford. The potato. 

641 H55c Hill, J. M. Canning, preserving and jelly making. 
716 K58 King, L. Y. Well-considered garden. 

746 K68cu Klickman, Flora, ed. Cult of the needle. 

746 K68m Klickman, Flora, ed. Modern crochet book. 

630 K81 Koester, Frank. Electricity for the farm and home. 

641 L96 Luck, Mrs. Brian, ed. Belgian cookbook. 

640 M22 MacLeod, S. J. Housekeeper's handbook of cleaning. 
639 M47 *Meehan, W. E. Fish culture. 

625.7 P14 Page, L. W. Roads, paths and bridges. 

641 P92 Pretlow, M. D. comp. Small family cookbook. 

636 V61 Verrill, A. H. Pets for pleasure and profit. 



GAMES AND AMUSEMENTS 

793 B57 Blain, M. E. Games for Hallowe'en. 

793 D32 Dawson, Mary. Money-making entertainments for 

church and charity. 

822 F85 Frank, M. M. Short plays about famous authors. 

793 G51c Glover, E. H. ed. Dame Curtsey's book of games. 

793 G62 Goodlander, M. R. Fairy plays for children. 

796 G76 Graham & Clark. Practical track and field athletics. 
793 L97 Liitkenhaus & Knox. Plays for school children. 

797 M 17 McGraw, J.J. How to play baseball. 

793 M19h Mackay, C. D. How to produce children's plays. 

797 P65 Pinkerton, R. E. The canoe. 

793 W15 Walker, A. J. Little plays from American history. 

796 W77 Withington, Paul, ed. Book of athletics. 

121 



BOOKS ON MECHANICAL AND FINE ARTS 



738 B23g Barber, E. A. American glassware. 

759.5 B45c Berenson, Bernhard. Central Italian painters of the 

renaissance. 

759.5 B45n Berenson, Bernhard. North Italian painters of the 

renaissance. 

745 B59 Blanchard, M. M. Basketry book. 

708.1 B84 Bryant, L. M. What pictures to see in America. 

745 C83 Cox, G. J. Pottery for artists, craftsmen and teachers. 

745 H88 Humphries, Sydney. Oriental carpets, runners and rugs. 

750 H93h Hurll, E. M. How to show pictures to children. 

537.8 M82 Morgan, A. P. Wireless telegraphy and telephony. 
745 P29 Payne, A. F. Art metalwork. 

694 V61a Verrill, A. H. Amateur carpenter. 

533.6 V61 Verrill, A. H. Harper's aircraft book. 
786 W65 Wilkinson, C. W. Well-known piano solos. 

LITERATURE, ESSAYS AND POETRY 

891.7 B24 Baring, Maurice. Outline of Russian literature. 
822 B27h Barrie, J. M. Half hours. 

820.9 C42 Chesterton, G. K. Victorian age in English literature. 

822.08 C54 Clark, B. H. British and American drama of to-day. 

842.8 C54 Clark, B. H. Contemporary French dramatists. 

840.9 C59 Clergue, Helen. The salon. 
842 C81c Corneille, Pierre. The Cid. 
842 C81p Corneille, Pierre. Polyeuctus. 

824 C88m Crothers, S. M. Meditations on votes for women. 

821 D29c Davis, F. S. Crack o' dawn. 

821 D29m Davis, F. S. Myself and I. 

822.08 D56 Dickinson, T. H. ed. Chief contemporary dramatists. 

821 K62zd Durand, Ralph. Handbook to the poetry of Rudyard 

Kipling. 

821 F92b Frost, Robert. A boy's will. 

821 F92n Frost, Robert. North of Boston. 

809.2 H91 Hunt, E. R. Play of to-day. 

824 J41 Jenkins, MacGregor. The reading public. 

821 C39zk Kittredge, G. L. Chaucer and his poetry. 

824.08 M43 Matthews, Brander, comp. Oxford book of American 

essays. 

792 M72 Moderwell, H. K. Theatre of to-day. 

824 P518b Phelps, W. L. Essays on books. 

821.08 R29 Repplier, Agnes, ed. Book of famous verse. 
824 S92 Strunsky, Simeon. Belshazzar court. 

840.9 V74 Vincent, L. H. The French academy. 

827 W46 Wells, H. G. Boon, the Mind of the race, etc. 

122 



BOOKS IN FRENCH AND GERMAN 

833 B87 *Bulow, Babette von. Ein regentag auf dem lande. 

833 E161 *Ebner-Eschenbach, Marie von. Krambambuli. 

833 G32g *Gerstacker, Friedrich. Germelshausen. 

832 G87 *Grillparzer, Franz. Sappho. 

833 H51m *Heyse, Paul. Das madchen von Treppi. 

92 F875s *Schrader, Ferdinand. Friedrich der grosse und der 

siebenjahrige krieg. 

833 S88t *Storm, Theodor. Geschichten aus der tonne. 

833 S94f *Sudermann, Hermann. Frau Sorge. 

833 S94z *Sudermann, Hermann. Im zwielicht. 

833 W64 *Wildenbruch, Ernst von. Das edle blut. 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

917.29 A21 Adams, F. U. Conquest of the tropics. 

917.8 A42 Allen, E. F. Guide to the National parks of America. 

914.15 B39 Begbie, Harold. Happy Irish. 

919.8 B64 Borup, George. Tenderfoot with Peary. 

914.2 C38 Chase, Beatrice. Through a Dartmoor window. 
915.4 C54 Clarke, F. E. Holy land of Asia minor. 
914.36 C55 *Clark, F. E. Old homes of new Americans. 

915.1 C78 Cooper, Elizabeth. My lady of the Chinese courtyard. 
914.93 E61 Ensor, R. C. K. Belgium. 

914.57 F57 Fitzgerald, S. & A. Naples. 

914.92 F62 Flemwell, G. Alpine flowers and gardens. 

914.95 G18 Garnett, L. M. J. Greece of the Hellenes. 

914.7 G19 Garstin, Denis. Friendly Russia. 

917 H19 Hannay, J. O. From Dublin to Chicago. 

917.3 H91 Hunt, Gaillard. Life in America one hundred years ago. 

910.4 K44 Kephart, Horace, ed. Castaways and Crusoes. 

918 K81 Koebel & Forrest. South America. 

917.8 L44 Lawson, W. P. Log of a timber cruiser. 
916.6 L89 Loring, J. A. African adventure stories. 
914.53 L96 Lucas, E. V. Wanderer in Venice. 

915.2 M37 *Masaoka, Naoichi. Japan to America. 
914.15 M43 Mathew & Walker. Ireland. 

919.1 M85 *Moses, Edith. Unofficial letters of an official's wife. 
606 P19 Panama-Pacific International exposition. Jewel city. 

917.9 P98 Putnam, G. P. In the Oregon country. 
918 R73s Ross, E. A. South of Panama. 

917.446 R72 Rossiter, W. S. ed. Days and ways in old Boston. 

915.2 R91 *Russell, Lindsay, ed. America to Japan. 
917.8 S53 Sharp, D. L. Where rolls the Oregon. 

917.3 S54 Shelley, H. C. America of the Americans. 

919.6 S847 *Stevenson, Mrs. R. L. Cruise of the Janet Nichol. 

123 



917.3 S93 
917.471 V28 

917.291 V61 



92B442 
92 \Y463b 
92P261 
92CSS41 
92 B439d 
92 S95S 
92C171 
92J921 
927.8 L13s 
92 M 7 74m 
92 R444 
92 S534 
92S812 
92S8511 
92 L924t 
92H322t 
92C813 
92 W272s 



940.9 A36 
940.9 B38 
940.9 B45 
940.9 E42 
986F74t 
945 F82 
973H25n 
940.9 H87b 
940.9 H87w 
940.9 G31 
940.9 KS7 
929.9 H24 

970.1 M78 

940.9 X48 
973.7 X82 



Street, Julian. Abroad at home. 
Van Dyke, J. C. New New York. 
Yerrill, A. H. Cuba past and present. 

BIOGRAPHY 

Benson, A. C. Hugh, memoirs of a brother. 
Beresford, J. D. H. G. Wells. 
Clark, William. Pascal and the Port Royalists. 
*Crosby, Fanny. Memories of eighty years. 
Darton, F. J. H. Arnold Bennett. 
*Ellis, W. T. Billy Sunday. 
Hawkins, C. J. Samuel Billings Capen. 
Hubbard, E. D. Ann of Ava. 

Lahee, H. C. Famous singers of to-day and yesterday. 
*McDowell, John. Dwight L. Moody. 
Rihbany, A. M. Far journey. 
Shaw, A. H. Story of a pioneer. 

Stedman & Gould. Life and letters of E. C. Stedman. 2v. 
Stewart, E. P. Letters on an elk hunt. 
Taylor, I. A. Making of a king, Louis XIII. 
Thayer, W. R. Life and letters of John Hay. 2v. 
Trollope, H. M. Corneille and Racine. 
^Washington, B. T. Story of my life and work. 
Vital records of Amesbury, Cambridge, Chelmsford, 
Heath, Rochester and Tyngsboro. 

HISTORY 

Aldrich, Mildred. Hilltop on the Marne. 

Beck, J. M. Evidence in the case. 

Bernhardi, Friedrich von. Germany and the next war. 

Eliot, C. W. Road toward peace. 

Forbes-Lindsay, C. H. A. Panama and the canal to-day. 

*Foulke, W. D. History of the Langobards. 

Hart, A. B. ed. American nation. 27v. 

*Hueffer, F. M. Between St. Denis and St. George. 

*Hueffer, F. M. When blood is their argument. 

I accuse (J 'accuse!) by a German. 

Kreisler, Fritz. Four weeks in the trenches. 

Harrison, P. D. Stars and stripes and other Anericam 

flags. 

*Moorehead, W. K. American Indian in the United 

States. 

Xew York Times current history of the war. v. 1-2. 

*Xorton, O. W. Attack and defense of Little Round Top, 

Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. 



121 



940.9 P22w *Parker, Sir Gilbert. World in the crucible. 

940.9 S54 Sheip, S. S. ed. Handbook of the European war. 

940.9 S98 *Sydenham, Lord. India and the war. 

973.9 U84 Usher, R. G. Pan-Americanism. 

940.9 W36 *Waxweiler, Emile. Belgium neutral and loyal. 

930 VV39 Webster, Hutton. Ancient history. 

940.9 W55 What I found out in the house of a German prince. 

940.9 W61 *Whitridge, F. W. One American's opinion of the 

European war. 

940.9 W76 *Wister, Owen. Pentecost of calamity. 

FICTION 

Allen, F. N. S. Her wings. 

Allen, J. L. Sword of youth. 

Andrews & Murray. August first. 

Atkinson, Eleanor. Johnny Appleseed. 

Bailey, Temple. Contrary Mary. 

Barcynska, Helene, ed. Little mother who sits at home. 

Bassett, S. W. Taming of Zenas Henry. 

Benson, R. H. Initiation. 

Benson, R. H. Loneliness? 

Benson, R. H. Richard Raynal, solitary. 

Bindloss, Harold. Long portage. 

Bindloss, Harold. Secret of the reef. 

Bordeaux, Henri. The house. 

Brebner, P. J. Christopher Quarles. 

Buckrose, Mrs. J. E. Spray on the windows. 

Caine, William. But she meant well. 

Carey, R. N. Other people's lives. 

Cather, W. S. Song of the lark. 

Chesterton, G. K. Wisdom of Father Brown. 

Childers, Erskine. Riddle of the sands. 

Churchill, Winston. Far country. 

Conrad, Joseph. Victory. 

Crockett, S. R. Hal o' the Ironsides. 

Daskam, J. D. B. Open market. 

Davis, R. H. Boy scout. 

Day, Holman. Landloper. 

Deland, Margaret. Around old Chester. 

Doyle, Sir A. C. Valley of fear. 

Dudley, Robert. In my youth. 

Eaton, W. P. Idyll of Twin fires. 

Erskine, Mrs. Payne. Girl of the Blue ridge. 

Ervine, St. J. G. Alice and a family. 

Farnol, Jeffery. Honorable Mr. Tawnish. 

Ferber, Edna. Emma McChesney & Co. 

125 



Ferris, E. E. Business adventures of Billy Thomas. 

Fisher, Mrs. D. C. Bent twig. 

Fisher, Mrs. D. C. Hillsboro people. 

Foote, M. H. Valley road. 

Forman, J. M. Blind spot. 

Gale, Zona. Neighborhood stories. 

Gale, Zona. When I was a little girl. 

Garland, Hamlin. Cavanagh, forest ranger. 

Gillmore, I. H. Ollivant orphans. 

Grayson, David. Hempfield. 

Grey, Zane. Lone star ranger. 

Haggard, H. R. Allan and the holy flower. 

Hall, E. V. Matthew Hargreaves. 

Hannay, J. O. Minnie's bishop, etc. 

Hardy, A. S. Diane and her friends. 

Harrison, H. S. Angela's business. 

Hinkson, K. T. Her ladyship. 

Jacobs, W. W. Night watches. 

Johnston, Mary. The witch. 

Jordan, Elizabeth. May Iverson's career. 

Kirkland, Winifred. Old Diller place. 

Lafon, Andre. Jean Gilles. 

Lagerlof, Selma. Jerusalem. 

Lee, Jennette. Aunt Jane. 

Leroux, Gaston. Phantom of the opera. 

Lincoln, J. C. Kent Knowles, quahaug. 

Lincoln, J. C. Thankful's inheritance. 

Little, Frances, pseud. House of the misty star. 

Locke, W. J. Jaffery. 

Lucas, E. V. Landmarks. 

Lutz, G. L. H. *Man of the desert. 

Malet, Lucas, pseud. Adrian Savage. 

Marshall, Archibald. House of Merrilees. 

Marshall, Archibald. Old order changeth. 

Martin, H. R. Martha of the Mennonnite country. 

Merwin, Samuel. Honey bee. 

Miller, Elizabeth. Daybreak. 

Montgomery, L. M. Anne of the island. 

Norris, Kathleen. Story of Julia Page. 

O'Higgins, H. J. Adventures of Detective Barney. 

Olmstead, Florence. Cloistered romance. 

Onions, Oliver. Mushroom town. 

Oppenheim, E. P. Double traitor. 

Oppenheim, E. P. Mr. Grex of Monte Carlo. 

Oxenham, John. Maid of the mist. 

Parker, Sir Gilbert. Money master. 

126 



Peterson, M. H. The commodore. 

Phillpotts, Eden. Brunei's tower. 

Phillpotts, Eden. Old Delabole. 

Poole, Ernest. The harbor. 

Pawlowska, Yoi". A child went forth. 

Porter, Mrs. G. S. Michael O'Halloran. 

Prydz, Alvilde. Sanpriel. 

Purdon, K. F. Folk of Furry farm. 

Ridge, W. P. Happy recruit. 

Rinehart, M. R. Circular staircase. 

Rinehart, M. R. K. 

Roland, John. Good shepherd. 

Runkle, Bertha. Straight down the crooked lane. 

Singmaster, Elsie. Katy Gaumer. 

Skrine, M. J. H. Billie's mother. 

Smith, F. H. Felix O'Day. 

Stringer, Arthur. Prairie wife. 

Tarkington, Booth. Turmoil. 

Vaizey, Mrs. J. B. Lady Cassandra. 

Viele, H. K. Inn of the silver moon. 

Walpole, Hugh. Golden scarecrow. 

Walpole, Hugh. Wooden horse. 

Ward, Mrs. M. A. A. Coryston family. 

Ward, Mrs. M. A. A. Eltham house. 

Webling, Peggy. Edgar Chirrup. 

Webster, Jean. Dear enemy. 

Wells, Carolyn. Maxwell mystery. 

Wells, H. G. Bealby. 

Whittles, T. D. *Parish of the pines. 

Wiggin, K. D. Penelope's postscripts. 

Williamson, C. N. & A. N. It happened in Egypt. 

Wilson, H. L. Ruggles of Red Gap. 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS; NON-FICTION 

973 A129d Abbot, W. J. Story of our army. 

353 A93 Austin, O. P. Uncle Sam's secrets. 

642 B12 Bache, E. D. and L. F. When Mother lets us make candy. 

292 B19o Baldwin, James. Old Greek stories. 

720 B28 Barstow, C. L. Famous buildings. 

796 B38o Beard, Lina & A. B. On the trail. 

359 C64 Codd, M.J. With Evans to the Pacific. 

614 D32 Dawson, Jean. Boys and girls of Garden city. 

927.8 D68 Dole, N. H. Score of famous composers. 

796 E13 Eastman, C. A. Indian scout talks. 

641 F81 Foster, O. H. Cookery for little girls. 

640 F81 Foster, O. H. Housekeeping for little girls. 

127 



646 F81 Foster, O. H. Sewing for little girls. 

374 F81b Foster, W. H. Debating for boys. 

920 G37 Gilbert, Ariadne. More than conquerors. 

973 G65s Gordy, W. F. Stories of early American history. 

622 G83 Greene, Homer. Coal and the coal mines. 

917.8 G88w Grinnell, G. B. Wolf hunters. 

790 G92 Grubb, M. E. When Mother lets us make gifts. 

172 G95 Gulliver, Lucile. Friendship of nations. 

793 H14t Hall, A. N. Home-made toys for girls and boys. 

398.2 H14 Hall, Jennie. Viking tales. 

914.93 J69 Jonckheere, Robert. When I was a boy in Belgium. 

796 K28 Kelland, C. B. American boys' workshop. 

232.9 K29 Kelman, J. H. Stories from the life of Christ. 
92 S848o Overton, J. M. Life of R. L. Stevenson. 

796 P87 Powell, Sir R. B. Boy scouts beyond the seas. 

796 R63 Rogers, Ethel. Sebago-Wohelo Camp Fire girls. 

599 S41 Schwartz, J. A. Wilderness babies. 

821.08 T32 Thacher, L. W. ed. The listening child. 

910.4 T52 Tisdale, Lieu. Three years behind the guns. 

598.2 T76 Trimmer, Sarah. History of the robins. 

917.29 V61 Verrill, A. H. Cruise of the Cormorant. 

920 Wll Wade, M. H. The light-bringers. 

STORIES FOR CHILDREN 

Altsheler, J. A. Star of Gettysburg. 

Barbour, R. H. Brother of a hero. 

Brady, C. T. Midshipman in the Pacific. 

Brown, E. A. Arnold's little brother. 

Burnett, Mrs. F. H. Lost prince. 

Chisholm, Louey, ed. Stories for the ten-year old. 

Coolidge, Susan. Eyebright. 

Dix, B. M. Little captive lad. 

Doubleday, Russell. Cattle ranch to college. 

Dyer, W. A. Pierrot, dog of Belgium. 

Eaton, W. P. Boy scouts of the Wildcat patrol. 

Fitzhugh, P. K. Along the Mohawk trail. 

Fitzgerald, Sir Percy. Jock of the bushveld. 

Gilchrist, B. B. Helen and the fifth cousins. 

Greene, Homer. Pickett's gap. 

Hale, L. P. Peterkin papers. 

Mason, A. B. Tom Strong, junior. 

Martineau, Harriet. Crofton boys. 

Matthews, Brander. Tom Paulding. 

Nesbit, E. pseud. New treasure seekers. 

Nesbit, E. pseud. Story of the amulet. 

Nesbit, E. pseud. Railway children. 

128 



Perkins, L. F. Eskimo twins. 

Quirk, L. W. Boy scouts of Black eagle patrol. 

Rankin, C. W. Cinder pond. 

Schultz, J. W. On the warpath. 

Segur, Sophie. Sophie's troubles. 

Segur, Sophie. Story of a donkey. 

Shaw, F. L. Castle Blair. 

Stein, Evaleen. Gabriel and the hour book. 

Stevenson, B. E. Tommy Remington's battle. 

Tomlinson, E. T. Four boys on the Mississippi. 

Waller, M. E. Daughter of the rich. 

Wheeler, F. R. Boy with the United States life-savers. 



129 



REPORT OF CUSTODIAN 
JOHN CORNELL ART GALERY 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the gallery for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1915. 

The attendance for the year has been 668. Of this number 
223 were adults and 445 children — a small attendance com- 
pared to some of the preceding years, but very good when one 
considers the fact that the gallery has been frequented for 
fifteen years, and that there are now many attractions, particu- 
larly for the children, that did not exist years ago. 

The gallery has certainly been a source of pleasure and profit 
to many people. It is interesting and encouraging to see the 
thoughtful consideration of the pictures that is shown by some 
of the school children. Picture-study in the schools should be 
attended by frequent visits to the gallery, particularly by the 
High School pupils. There they would find much to quicken 
their interest in history and literature as well as art. They could 
spend much time studying Velasquez's "The Surrender of 
Breda", or "The Lances" as it is often called. This picture 
should lead them to desire to become acquainted with the his- 
tory of the unconquerable Dutch nation. And this is only one 
of the many inspiring pictures in the gallery. 

The stereographs are still enjoyed by many, adults as well as 
children finding them most helpful. New subjects would be 
most welcome, and are, in fact, needed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABBIE S. DAVIS 

Custodian 



130 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



SIXTEENTH 
ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



EMBRACING THE TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 
WATER COMMISSIONERS AND NINETEENTH 
ANNUAL REPORT OF SEWER 
COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1915 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1916 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

1889—1899 

JOHX H. FLINT *JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 

FELIX G. HAYXES 

SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

W"&~ 1893—1894 1894—1899 

*WM. S. JENKINS *WM. S. JENKINS 

JOHN L. SMITH JOHN L. SMITH 

CHAS. E. ABBOTT JOHN E. SMITH 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

1899—1902 1903—1906 

JOHX H. FLIXT JOHX L. SMITH 

*WM. S. JENKINS FELIX G. HAYNES 

JOHN L. SMITH JOHN W. BELL 

*JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD LEWIS T. HARDY 

FELIX G. HAYNES JAMES C. SAWYER 

1906—1907 

FELIX G. HAYNES JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy 

JOHX W. BELL, Treas. LEWIS T. HARDY 

HARRY M. EAMES 

1907—1908 

FELIX G. HAYNES JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy. 

JOHX W. BELL, Treas. LEWIS T. HARDY 

ANDREW McTERNEN 

1908—1912 

LEWIS T. HARDY JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy. 

JOHN W. BELL, Treas. ANDREW McTERNEN 

WILLIS B. HODGKINS 

1913—1915 1913—1916 

ANDREW McTERNEN, Sec'y, '14 LEWIS T. HARDY 

WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas., '14 BARNETT ROGERS 

1913—1917 

THOMAS E. RHODES, Chairman, '14 

SUPERINTENDENT 

FRANK L. COLE 

*Deceased. 



REPORT OF 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



To the Citizens of the Town of A ndover: 

Your Board of Public Works submit their third annual 
report (actual service from May 5, 1913), which is also the 
twenty-seventh of the Water System, and the nineteenth of the 
Sewer System, for the year ending December 31, 1915. This 
is also the third annual report of the Highway and Park Depart- 
ments under the Board of Public Works. 

Organization 

On the re-election of Willis B. Hodgkins and Andrew Mc- 
Ternen for the term of three years, the personnel of the Board of 
Public works remains the same as last year, viz : Barnett Rogers, 
Lewis T. Hardy, Willis B. Hodgkins, Andrew McTernen and 
Thomas E. Rhodes. The organization of the present Board of 
Public Works occurred March 3, 1915, with the following rank, 
viz: Chairman, Thomas E. Rhodes; Secretary, Andrew Mc- 
Ternen; Treasurer, Willis B. Hodgkins. The Board re-app.ointed 
Frank L. Cole as Superintendent of all the departments under 
the control of the Board of Public Works at a salary of $2100. 
Arthur R. Morse was also re-appointed clerk and assistant 
superintendent of all the departments under the control of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Water Department 

For a detailed account of this department see the Super- 
intendent's report. Water-main extensions this year are below 
the average, which is about two miles per year for the past 
ten years. 

Our present mileage is 50.08 miles, an increase of .44 miles. 
Increase of service-pipes 60, increase in meters 67 and in hydrants 



5. Cost of total maintenance per million gallons $42.49. revenue 
per million gallons S93.32. leaving a balance per million gallons 
of $50.83, an increase balance per million gallons over last year 
of $29.48. Your Board recommended that the sum of $10,000 
be appropriated for maintenance, $1500 for construction, and 
$750 for sinking fund. 

The Water Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the Water System is $173,000, there 
having been paid during the year 1915 $8000 of the ¥~ c bonds 
and $3000 of the 3 1 2 r c bonds. Xo bonds were issued during 1915, 
all authorized bonds having been issued. 

Of the above amount of indebtedness $50,000 is redeemable 
by sinking funds which amount to $32,046.29 and an appro- 
priation of $750 is asked for the Sinking Funds. 

The Sewer Department 

For a detailed account of the Sewer Department see the 
report of the Superintendent. The chief feature to report is 
the extension of the sewer on Elm Street according to a plan 
previously accepted by the Town. The rebuilding of Elm 
Street necessitated the extension of this sewer. Sewer extension 
on Summer and Avon Streets was not according to the plan 
accepted by the Town, but the building activity on these streets 
required prompt action, and your Board deemed it wise to do 
the extension, believing that the welfare and public health 
required it. In the construction of the Abbott Village Sewer 
the Town is rid of the pump and nuisance on Phillips Street. 
The upkeep of the filter-beds has been satisfactory to the State 
Board of Health and to your Board. Their capacity to do work 
has never been greater. Your Board would recommend that 
the sum of $2000 be appropriated for maintenance. We recom- 
mend for sinking fund $1000; for first payment on Abbott 
Village Sewer Bond Loan $4505.67. 

The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The Sinking Fund is S15099.28. During 1915, S7000 of 
bonds were sold. This amount is the balance of the S 10.000 
authorized bv the Town in March. 1910. These bonds are due 



in 1919, and $30,000 due in 1928, leaving a net bonded debt of 
$24900.72. An appropriation of $1000 is asked for. 

ABBOTT VILLAGE SEWER SYSTEM 

At a special town meeting, March 31, 1915, the Town voted 
to accept the sewer plan of McClintock and Wood fall, known 
as the Abbott Village Sewer, and authorized the issuance of 
bonds to the amount of $75,000 for the construction of the 
sewer. After the proper officials had concluded favorably the 
necessary negotiations and the assurance of the sale of the bonds, 
your Board appointed Mr. John Franklin to draw up specifica- 
tions and plans preliminary to calling for bids, and to act as the 
Town's engineer to look after the Town's interests in the con- 
struction of the sewer at a commission of seven per cent on the 
cost of construction. The work was divided into three parts 
in the call for bids, viz: 1st, laying of the mains, manholes and 
related work; 2nd, pump-house and equipment; and 3rd, filter- 
beds. The call for bids on the laying of mains, etc., resulted in 
the employment of Cenedella Co., at the sum of $39,739, rock 
$5.50 per cubic yard, and lumber $50 per thousand feet. The 
lowest bid on pump-house was $6918.50, and was awarded to 
Philip L. Hardy. Equipment for pump-house was given to the 
Lawrence Gas Co. at $2620. The filter-beds will be constructed 
by the Sewer Department. The sewer was to be completed by 
November 1, 1915, but on account of unavoidable obstacles 
such as storms, high water in the river, and the unforeseen 
quantity of rock excavation required, Mr. Cenedella asked for 
more time, which was granted. As your Board could not wisely 
accept the constructed sewer until spring, there was no necessity 
for an earlier completion, as the work which was in progress was 
on private land and did not interfere with travel. 

Because of the unfavorable condition of the old sewer-main 
and the smallness of the pipe that conveyed the sewerage from 
the old pump-house up Main to Harding and then to High 
Street, your Board believed it wise to lay a new main with greater 
capacity in a direct line from the new pump-house through 
private land. This would diminish the friction head and lessen 
the cost of maintenance. This pipe line was laid by the Sewer 
Department. For further information see the Engineer's report. 

7 



Andover, Mass., January 1, 1916 

To the Board of Public Works, 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

In connection with the construction of the Abbott Village 
Sewer, I have to report on the progress of the work as follows: — 

The contract for constructing pipe-lines was awarded to 
Cenedella & Company of Milford, Mass., on the 21st day of 
July, 1915. The prices agreed upon were as follows: 

For completing the work according to plan, excepting rock 
excavation, and timber and gravel foundations, $39,739. 

For rock excavation, $5.50 per cubic yard. 

For timber foundation, $50.00 per M. 

For gravel foundations, $1.00 per cubic yard. 

Work was started as soon as the contract was signed. During 
the first two months much, interference was caused by frequent 
rains, about 26 days being lost on this account. Much more 
rock has been encountered than was expected, so it was not 
possible to complete the work within the time limit. The pipe- 
laying is now nearly completed, only about 100 feet remaining 
to be done. There is a good deal of back filling and cleaning up 
to do, most of which will have to be done in the spring. 

The amount of money paid to Cenedella & Co., up to January 
1st, including the December estimate, is $39,290. 

The total amount of rock excavated up to January 1st, is 
1741 cubic yards. The total number of feet of sewer built is as 
follows : — 



16" 


pipe 


2860 feet 


15" 


pipe 


3882 feet 


10" 


pipe 


2018 feet 


8" 


pipe 


5436 feet 


6" 


pipe 


1060 feet 


Tot; 


15256 feet 



The contract to build the pump-house was awarded to Philip 
Hardy for S6918.50. Work was started October 6th. The 
buildings are now nearly completed. The grading of the lot 

8 



cannot be completed until spring. Amount paid on pump-house 
to date is $4000. 

The contract for pumps and motors was awarded to the 
Lawrence Gas Company for $2620. The pumps are nearly ready 
to be installed, but there will be a considerable delay in getting 
the motors. 

An 8-inch force-main has been laid from the new pump-house 
to the outlet sewer on High Street. A new sludge-bed has been 
completed and much grading has been done preparatory to 
putting in the new filter-beds. The work of building the new 
filter-beds will be taken up and completed in the spring. 

The total amount expended to date of force-main and filter- 
beds is $3189.85. 

The total amount expended to date for everything connected 
with the sewer is $50085.98. 

JOHN FRANKLIN, 

Engineer 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Highway Conditions 

For a detailed report of the Highway Department see the 
report of the Superintendent. Our highway conditions show 
marked improvement since last report. The policy of preserving 
our macadam roads with Tarvia B and sand shows evidence of 
success, for our macadam roads are now in better condition 
than ever. The unit cost of the work done, the only measure 
of ofhciency, will compare favorably with any municipal or 
contract work of similar grade. Our new work this year was the 
macadamizing of part of Bartlet, Morton and Elm Streets, and 
with the cooperation of the County and State, part of Lowell 
Street. We have also rebuilt part of High Street, Walnut 
Avenue, Harding and Haverhill Streets. Because of the damage 
by storms much money has been spent in the West district. 
Your Board believe it good policy when reconstructing our 
streets to lay permanent drains and build sufficient catch-basins 
to take care of the water. Much has been done along that line 
this year. Your Board would suggest the reconstruction of 



Central, School, Brook and a larger part of Lowell Streets this 
year. The County's and the State's cooperation on Lowell 
Street we believe is assured. Much complaint is manifest of our 
slippery roads, and is receiving due consideration by your Board. 
Permanency and economy recommend the tarvia-bound maca- 
dam in preference to the gravel and water-bound macadam. 

The County has reported and given the Town plans of their 
re-survey of North Main Street, Brook, High, Elm Streets and 
Walnut Avenue. Your Board would recommend the appro- 
priation of $25,000 for highways and the inclusion of the railroad 
franchise and excise tax. Your Board would recommend a 
special appropriation of $5000 for Lowell Street to be spent with 
equal amounts by the County and State. 

The Dust-laying Problem 

On account of our present method of preserving the surface 
of our macadam roads and laying the dust on our gravel roads, 
an assessment on the abutters becomes unjust. Those who live 
along the macadam roads are occasionally exempt from the 
dust tax because they do not require treatment every year, while 
the gravel roads require treatment every year and therefore are 
taxed every year. In a very few years, at the present rate of 
reconstruction of our roads, the Center will be all macadam and 
then it would probably be wise to discontinue the tax, if not at 
present. The cost of preserving the road surface and the dust- 
laying is so involved in road construction and maintenance that 
it is impossible to separate the cost, and this gives another 
reason for discontinuing the tax. 

Sidewalks 

Much improvement has been made on sidewalks this year in 
cinder and stonedust walks, repairing concrete, and new con- 
crete. New walks have been built on Abbot Street, Shawsheen 
Road (with curbing), and on Lowell Street. Much work has 
been done on sidewalks and drains on Haverhill Street. Your 
Board would recommend the appropriation of $1500 for side- 
walks, $500 to be used under the Betterment Act. 

10 



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Park and Playstead 

The upkeep of the Park and Playstead has been the chief 
expense this year. We made an agreement with the A.V.I.S. to 
take care of the Boulders for the sum of $150, believing that their 
interest and experience in such work would produce the best 
results. Because of complaints of damage by water caused by 
the insufficient capacity of the drain-pipes from the Playstead 
to the brook, your Board caused another line of pipes to be laid 
parallel with the old. Your Board would recommend that the 
sum of $1500 be appropriated for Parks and Playstead. 

THOMAS E. RHODES 
BARNETT ROGERS 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 
LEWIS T. HARDY 

Board of Public Works 



12 



REDEMPTION OF LOANS 



Dr. 



To Redeem Water Loans 



No. 1 due 1920 



No. 2 
No. 3 
No. 4 
No. 5 



1922 
1923 
1925 

1928 



Balance, Jan. 1, 1915 
Appropriation, March 1, 1915 
Interest on Investments 



S29984 13 

750 00 

1312 16 









$32046 29 


Cr 








Water Loan Funds Deposited — 








Andover Savings Bank 






S 8010 07 


Andover National Bank 






24036 22 




S32046 29 


Dr. 








To Redeem Sewer Loans 


$10000 


due 


1919 




30000 


a 


1928 


Balance, Jan. 1, 1915 






S13172 97 


Appropriation, March 1, 1915 






1000 00 


Assessments, 1915 






408 63 


Interest on Deposits 






517 68 



S15099 28 



Cr. 



Sewer Loan Funds Deposited- 
Andover National Bank 



$15099 28 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
LEWIS T. HARDY - 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 
BARNETT ROGERS 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Sinking Fund Commissioners 



Examined, Feb. 10, 1916 

Nesbit G. Gleason 
D. R. Lawson 
W. H. Coleman 
Auditors 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Public Works. 

Gentlemen: I herewith present my report for the year 
Ending December 31, 1915, which is the twenty-seventh of the 
Water Department and the nineteenth of the Sewer System ; and 
the third annual report of Highways and Parks under your 
supervision. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

The water-mains have been extended this year on Rocky Hill 
Road a distance of 1460 feet of 6-inch C. I. pipe, at a cost of 
$1492.03. There were 165 yards of ledge on this job, making the 
cost a small margin over $1.00 a foot. The next extension was 
192 feet of 8-inch C. I. pipe on Main Street. This was somewhat 
ledges, the job costing $204.60. A 6-inch C. I. pipe-line from 
Haverhill Street on High Street, to the residence of John A. 
Driscoll, a distance of 541 feet, was laid during December at a 
cost of $615.30; making a total of 2193 feet of new water main 
laid in 1915. 

On Chestnut Street a new 8-inch C. I. main has been laid 
from Central Street to Main Street, a distance of 685 feet. 
On account of the service on this street it was necessary to lay 
at a depth of about seven feet. This job when completed cost 
$895.89. I hope money enough may be raised, to go with money 
we already have, so this may be continued to Whittier Street 
this spring. 

Water mains were also laid for Mr. W. M. Wood and Phillips 
Academy; these were paid for by applicants. Cost, plus 10%. 

These additions make the present plant, December 31, 1915, 
as follows: 

Total length of main pipe in service 50.06 miles 

Number of hydrants 369 

Number of public buildings 15 

Number of fountains 8 

Number of standpipes 10 

Number of faucets at parks 4 

Number of private hydrants 34 

14 



SERVICE PIPES 

There were received 60 applications for new service pipes, and 
these were all laid. The number of feet laid by the Town from 
main to street lines was 1387 feet, and by the property owners 
2295 feet. This year there have been four relaid, making a total 
on December 31, 1915, of 623 cement-lined pipes, and 804 lead- 
lined; 38 all other kinds, including solid lead, tarred, etc., making 
1465 in number or 114,966 feet in length. 

METERS 

During the year 1915, 67 new meters were set, making a total 
of 1262 now in use. I would recommend meters be set on the 
remaining services not at present metered. 

PUMPING PLANTS 

The High Service Station on Bancroft Road has this year 
received a general overhauling after seven years' work. The 
pumping has increased at this station during the last year. 

Haggett's Pond Station where all water is first pumped from, 
has been running during 1915, 365 days — 90 days on oil and 275 
days on steam plant. Running time according to engineer's 
sheets, 3509 hours, 27 minutes. During this time about 240 
million gallons of water were pumped. Number of gallons 
pumped by oil, 59,853,135; by steam, 180,746,043; or a daily 
average of 659,175 gallons. The cost of pumping was practically 
the same as last year, only a slight increase of about S30.00, while 
according to records there were about 6 million more gallons 
pumped. 

The pond has remained higher this year than for a longwhile 
on account of summer rains. The ground purchased by the 
Town from the Boston Ice Company, which borders the pond, 
has been cleaned up a little and some wood that was dead has 
been cut and sold. 

The steam plant is having a general overhauling by the makers 
this winter, so that by spring everything at the Haggett's Pond 
Station will be in first-calss condition. 

15 



WATER RATES 

Water rates have increased this year over last year; they are 
now on a year's footing. The report this year shows four full 
quarters of receipts, amounting to $22,451.01, which will show 
in Table. 

GENERAL REPORT 

Our workshop on Lewis Street has had a new roof put on by 
Andrew Wilson. A new barn has been built for the storage of 
Highway and Waterworks horses and several vehicles. Cost of 
same will be reported under Highway Department. The build- 
ings at Haggett's Pond are in a very good condition; also the 
building on Bancroft Road. Both fences around each reservoir 
need painting during 1916. Building at filter-beds in good 
condition. 

The barn formerly used as a stable by the Water Department 
has been turned into a storehouse for Akron fittings, coke, gates, 
gate-boxes, hydrants, soil-pipe, etc. 

The property owned by the Town, under the care of the 
Board of Public Works, is all in good condition. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

This past year has been a busy one in the Sewer Department. 
On house connection work we have had 52 applications, and all 
accepted and 49 laid, making a total of 707 house connections 
at present. 

During the year extensions were made on Elm Street from 
Whittier Street to Washington Avenue, a distance of about 
990 feet. Four manholes were necessary, as well as a 5-inch 
under-drain. The cost of this job, including all labor and ma- 
terial and 105 yards ledge work, was $1520.22. 

We next went to Avon Street from Chestnut to Summer, 
about 800 feet; we also had three manholes and a 5-inch under- 
drain. This cost $792.71. 

Summer Street, from Avon to Pine Street, a distance of about 
500 feet, also had to be underdrained and two manholes built. 
This was a very wet job and we had considerable trouble. Cost 
of this work, including all labor and material, $625.15. 

FRANK L. COLE, SupL 
16 



RECEIPTS 



BILLS 


Mainte- 
nance 


Service 
Pipe 


Pipe 
Distri- 
bution 


Totals 


Various parties, service pipe and meters 
Various parties, repairs and labor 


#241 01 


#1529 24 
890 25 


1716 29 


#1529 24 
1847 55 




#241 01 


#2419 49 


#1716 29 


#4376 79 



Water rates 



Credits paid Town Treasurer 

Water Rates #22451 01 

Pipe Account 4376 79 

#26827 80 



22451 01 
#26827 80 



#26827 80 



Approved 

NESBIT G. GLEASON ] 

W. H. COLEMAN f Auditors 

D. R. LAWSON J 



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SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

WATER DEPARTMENT 



Designation 



Summary | 
Approved | Credits 
Bills 



Net Cost 

for 

1915 



Total Cost 

of 

Construction 



Office Fixtures . 

Telemeters 

Telephones 

Teams 

Pipe Distribution . 
Service Pipe . 
Water and Land Drainage 
Suction Pipe . 

Reservoirs 

Coalshed 

Grading Land . 

Workshop 

Building Pumping Station 
Pumping-plants 
Construction Expenses 

Tools 

Maintenance . 



3 4695 12 ^1716 29 
4175 99 2419 49 



62 96 
10223 99 



241 01 



$ 



$ 2978 83 
1756 50 



62 96 
9982 98 



561 75 

1311 63 

184 77 

583 65 

3248476 10 

23954 66 

6687 23 

1309 46 

16985 82 

806 97 

1739 12 

1271 88 

9610 14 

44401 83 

9406 21 

3154 79 



Totals 



319158 0634376 79 314781 27 



3370446 01 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Sewer mains in feet 


27309.10 






Number of filter-beds 




23 




Number of sludge-beds 




3 




Cost to the abutters 






3103876 98 


Cost to the Town 






34625 66 




27309.10 


26 


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Gallons pumped 




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Cost of 
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SUPERINTENDENT OF HIGHWAYS 

AND PARKS 



To the Board of Public Works. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the Third Annual Report of 
the Highway and Park Department, for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1914. 

During the early months of the year, ashes were hauled to 
High Street from Haverhill Street to the North Andover line. 
Ashes were also placed on Haverhill Street, a distance of about 
500 feet. Haverhill Street, from the residence of John Traynor 
to River Bridge, was graded up with gravel from Mrs. Flint's 
pit on Lowell Street; this, after being wet and well rolled, made 
a very good street. Many other small jobs were also attended 
to, such as blanketing streets, oiling, cleaning gutters, and raking 
stones. The first job of any account done this year was Bartlet 
Street. This was started on June 2 and completed June 28. 
Morton Street, between Bartlet and Main Streets, was next 
done, as well as between Main and School Streets. Catchbasins 
and pipes were put in where necessary on both of these streets. 
On July 7, we started Elm Street, near the residence of Harry 
M. Eames, and continued work here until the last of July, 
when we were obliged to stop work, near the residence of O. P. 
Chase, for a period of four weeks. During this time we had to 
repair washouts in several different parts of the town, caused 
by the heavy showers during July. Among these places were 
Hardy's Hill in West Andover; Chandler Road near the River 
Road, by residence of Mr. George Disbrow; Walnut Avenue was 
also repaired; High Street Hill, and many small places where 
only a load or two were needed. We finally started on Elm 
Street again and continued to the Square, both sides, also done 
the Square; set curbing on both sides of Elm Street about 450 
feet. On this street a 10-inch drain was started at the culvert 
near the residence of Mrs. Moses Foster, and carried to Wolcott 
Avenue; here two catchbasins were built and a 12-inch pipe 
run to catchbasin a,t the head of Maple Avenue, then followed 

24 



the drain on Maple Avenue to the river. One catchbasin was 
built on the corner by George F. Abbott's to catch the Summer 
Street water, and also across Elm Street to Maple Avenue. All 
corners on the approaching streets were curbed. The material 
taken from this street was used on the resurfacing of part of 
Maple Avenue, Summer Street, and some on Washington 
Avenue and Walnut Avenue. Elm Street was completed on 
September 25, except sidewalk work, which will be reported 
under Sidewalks. 

On September 28, Lowell Street was started, under plans and 
specifications of the Massachusetts Highway Commission for 
a 18-foot Tarvia-bound road. There were 5600 square yards 
done at a cost of $6010. Of this amount, $4000 was paid by the 
County and State, the road being done under the Betterment 
Act; that is, the Town, County and State each sharing one- 
third of the cost. This price included grading, labor, teams, 
in fact, everything done. This was completed November 29. 
We then started on Harding Street, between the bridge and 
Main Street. Here both gutters were paved, gravel placed 
on roadbed, well rolled, and sidewalks repaired. The cost will 
appear in another column for all these jobs, as well as many 
others. W r hen Harding Street was completed, work practically 
was completed for the year. 

BALLARDVALE DISTRICT 

Work done by Mr. John A. Haggerty with fire horses and help 
obtained in Ballardvale. Scraped Abbot Street from Porter 
Road to the residence of Mr. T. D. Thomson. Laid a 10-inch 
corrugated pipe across the road entering Pomp's Pond icehouses. 
Cleaned gutters and graveled Porter Road to the Spring Grove 
Road. Scraped Woburn Street to the Wilmington line, Ballard- 
vale road from Woburn Street to the Boston turnpike, and made 
repairs on the Abbott Hill. Scraped And over Street and dragged 
same, from W. B. Hodgkins' to Woburn Street, and made repairs 
on High Street. River Street was scraped to the icehouses and 
gutters cleaned ; also made repairs on Hill near Wilmington line. 
Graveled Andover Street from River Street to High Street. 
Small improvements were made on Marland, Center, Oak, 

25 



Tewksbury and Chester Streets. Put in 10-inch corrugated pipe 
on Oak Street, 32 feet across road. Clark Road and Dascomb 
Road were scraped and cleaned up, as well as Osgood Street to 
residence of Mr. Way; Lovejoy Road to residence of Joseph 
Lovejoy. There were two catchbasins built at corner of Church 
Street and Andover Street, to relieve the water passing across 
Andover Street; these were both connected to a drain which 
ran along the street to the catchbasin belonging to the Boston 
and Maine Railroad. Permission was granted us to enter this, 
which saved us piping clear to the river. This relieved the 
greater part of the trouble at this corner. 

OILING AND SPRINKLING 

During the summer there was spent on oiling streets $1068.46. 
Sprinkling was nothing. Now under oiling and sprinkling of 
course there is to be considered the blanket we use over our 
tarvia roads to prevent dust from blowing. This has been 
charged up to Maintenance of Roads. I wish more oiling might 
be done, as I believe that when a gravel road, properly shaped 
up, wet and well rolled, then left to dry out a day or two, if 
oiled directly after this process, it will keep its shape and at a 
less cost of maintenance, for a good while, especially Andover 
Street from Woburn clear around to residence of Joseph Stanley 
where tarvia starts. This would preserve the road and would 
save on repairs greatly. Summer Street, which has just been 
graded with material from Elm Street, should be just the same, 
and so on. 

SURFACE DRAINAGE 

Drain and catchbasins have been laid on Elm Street, Morton 
Street, Andover Street in Ballardvale, and in fact lots of stone 
culverts which have been filled up are being removed and large 
pipes are being placed in their places. This drainage is some- 
thing that I am putting a good deal of thought and study into, 
as all streets before being built new must be drained properly 
or the street will be washed away. Of course the more catch- 
basins put in, the greater the cost of maintenance will be, as 
these must all be cleaned out several times a year. 

26 



GRAVEL ROADS 

These are all right where the travel is light, but on any of 
our main streets it is impossible with the heavy travel of today, 
to keep them in repair and safe. And gravel fit for our side 
streets is almost impossible to find. So about the only thing to da 
is to build water-bound roads on our side streets, and tarvia or 
something else on all our main thoroughfares. These tarvia 
roads should be built, and that is what we are doing wherever 
possible. These should be built so as to have a passage on both 
sides for the horse-drawn vehicles. 

GUTTERS 

Gutters are continually washing out and need cleaning or 
oiling to kill weeds two or three times a year. I hope to repair 
gutters as fast as possible with a paving, or fill well with crushed 
stone and then run Tarvia X into same. This we tried on 
Walnut Avenue, and heavy rains came before the tarvia was cold, 
but the material still is in place. This I believe is as good as 
anything for the money. 

RESURFACING 

Most streets will only receive enough blanketing in 1916 to 
prevent dust blowing; instead of using one-half gallon to the 
yard, one-quarter gallon will be used, reducing the cost of the 
work from 53^c to about 3c. Of course, some streets will need 
the regular amount, but this work will have to be done at least 
once in two or three years on the outside streets only. 

SIDEWALKS 

This work has been going on at all times of year. Ashes here 
and there, with a little dust put over same, makes a good walk 
for side streets, and we are doing this a great deal during the 
early months of the year; hauling the ashes, then in spring we 
cover with the dust. Tar sidewalks have been repaired on 
Bardet Street, Main Street , Salem Street, Elm Street. New 
walks under the Betterment Act were built on Abbot Street, 
Shawsheen Road, and Lowell Street. The repairing and new 

27 



work was done by W. F. Duffee of Haverhill under a contract 
and a seven-year guarantee. Curbing was also set on Shawsheen 
Road, one-half of same being paid by the Smith & Dove Co. 

There were three cars of dust put on sidewalks in Ballard- 
vale during 1915. There was also an addition to the curbing 
on the east side of Andover Street, 275 feet. I am in hopes to 
do more of the cement work during the coming year. 

The expenditures on repairs and new work by streets is as 
follows : 



Argilla Road 
Abbot Street 
Andover Street (Does not include Haggerty's 

work) 
Bartlet Street, resurfacing and new work 
Burnham Road, ashes, wetting and rolling 
Brook Street, gravel 
Chandler Road, washout 
Chestnut Street 
Corbett Street, washout 
Central Street 
Elm Street 
Florence Street 
High Street 
Haverhill Street 
Harding Street, above bridge 
Harding Street, below bridge 
Hardy's Hill, West Andover 
Lowell Street 
Locke Street 
Lewis Street 
Lincoln Street 
Main Street 
Maple Avenue 
Morton Street 
Phillips Street 
Punchard Avenue 
Porter Road 



45 


96 


149 


08 


255 


36 


3317 


03 


217 


71 


7 


40 


735 


50 


127 


59 


5 


92 


32 


14 


9292 


16 


23 


94 


1502 


68 


394 


57 


46 


02 


374 


59 


191 


99 


6164 


33 


47 


07 


141 


61 


17 46 


684 


78 


168 


99 


928 


38 


32 


41 


49 


04 


336 


52 



28 



Poor Street 36 45 

Pine Street 90 44 

Park Street 147 20 

Prospect Hill Road 25 77 

River Road 482 25 

Salem Street 688 86 

Summer Street 522 23 

School Street 68 72 

Whittier Street 59 60 

Wolcott Avenue 65 94 

Walnut Avenue 955 20 

Washington Avenue 203 04 

Catchbasin 195 55 
Ballardvale District, all work from Jan. 1 

to Jan. 1 $1756 02 

Many small jobs were done of which no account was kept, on 
many other streets where only a load or two of material was 
needed, and on work done around the shop, barn, etc., where no 
foreman or superintendent was present, no exact time could be 
kept, only on payrolls, which show elsewhere. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Central Street to be rebuilt from Essex Street. 

(1) As road is at present there are 12,000 square yards. 
Estimated cost, $8400. 

(2) If a 18-foot roadway is built, except first 200 feet, 9756 
yards. Estimated cost, $6829. 

(3) Full width past T. A. Holt's, 22-foot to South Church, 
18-foot to bridge, 10,236 yards. Estimated cost, $7165. 

(4) Full width past T. A. Holt's, 22-foot to Phillips Street, 
18-foot to bridge, 10,902 yards. Estimated cost, $7631. 

There are two corners at Brook Street, two at Chestnut Street, 
$100.00, four at School Street, as well as drains and catchbasins 
to be built — $500.00. The estimate of this street is $7680.00. 

29 



School Street. — A 16-foot tarvia-bound road which will 
leave ample room on either side for horse-drawn vehicles, from 
Central to Main Street. Curb corners where not already done. 
Build a large drain starting at Locke or Abbot Street and running 
down to the brook between the cemeteries on lower end of School 
Street. Catchbasins at Abbot Street, Locke Street, and also 
connect culvert which crosses Mr. Cann's and Miss Kimball's 
property, relieving that a great deal; from here down a larger 
pipe would be necessary. 

Estimated cost of street, and drains, catchbasins, etc, S6000. 

Brook Street. — I would recommend curbing both sides of 
the street and building a gravel or water-bound road, so that 
Essex Street may be blanketed before coming apart; then the 
heavy teaming may be done on Brook Street, and Essex Street 
may be used for lighter-drawn vehicles. This gravel road on 
Brook Street may be well treated with oil, and I think will make 
an excellent road for heavy teaming and will also be dust- 
proof. $1600. 

Abbot Street, Lupine Road, and the roads in Abbott Village 
also need a great deal of attention. Abbott Village will of 
course be dug up more this coming summer on account of house 
connections to be made with the sewer; after this there will need 
be many repairs in this section. 

West District needs roads scraped and shaped up, as now the 
water all runs in the center of the roads. The trouble in the 
outlying districts is that the gutters have been and are now, 
more or less blocked up. 

Lowell Street needs to be continued from Station 28. I hope 
a separate appropriation may be obtained for this road, to go 
with the Massachusetts Highway Commission and County, as 
this is being done under the Betterment Act, each bearing 
one- third of the cost, and the more the town gives, the more 
help we get from the County and State. The State has prom- 
ised, and we hope that a separate amount may be set aside for 
this work each year, and the State and County will meet the 
amount we appropriate. So this year I hope the amount will be 
S5000. This will only be spent providing they equal it. 

30 



Curbing needs to be re-set on a great many corners in town, 
and this is being done as fast as possible. 

I would recommend SI 000 be appropriated to go with what 
we have on hand, to replace the 4-inch water main on Chestnut 
Street from Main to Whittier Street, for a 8-inch C. I. main and 
make necessary connections; and install new hydrants with a 
6-inch opening. 

Sidewalk complaints are coming in every day, but when the 
frost is coming out of the ground, I or no one else can help the 
muddy streets. Now there is a Betterment Act under which the 
people may apply for a tar sidewalk, curbing, or asphalt walk, 
and any time before September 1st the Board are glad to receive 
same, and due care is always used in this expenditure. 

Park Department Work. — I would recommend that a 
baseball diamond be laid out in Ballardvale, as a great deal of 
enjoyment is obtained in this game down there, and at present 
we spend about $100 a year there and then there is nothing but 
holes and weeds. I would recommend the making of a baseball 
diamond on the play grounds at Ballardvale. 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

General work is all that has taken place during the last year, 
except placing an additional pipe across Mr. Lombard's land to 
relieve the water which flows to the main brook. I would say 
the amount spent in the Park Department, including work on 
Ballardvale Playstead, was S1279.23, leaving a balance of 
$220.77 on hand. 



31 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915- 



Highway Department 




S25000 00 


Railway Franchise Tax 




2021 75 


Railway Excise Tax 




2001 60 


Sprinkling 




1453 74 


Massachusetts Highway Commission 




2000 00 


County Commission 




2000 00 


Credits (various accounts) 




1333 83 


Transferred from Snow 




385 00 




S36195 92 


Expenditure — 






Maintenance Highways 


$14711 51 




Construction Highway 


19000 55 




Drains 


1388 98 




Oiling 


1068 46 




Balance, Jan. 1, 1916 


26 42 






S36195 92 S36195 92 


SIDEWALKS 






Sidewalks 






Appropriation, March 1, 1915 




S2000 00 


Credits 




466 67 


Expenditures 


S2410 59 




Balance, Jan. 1, 1916 


56 08 





S2466 67 S2466 67 



Snow 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

Expenditure 

Balance 



S1497 21 
2 79 



S1500 00 



55 



S1500 00 S1500 00 



Park Department 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 

Expenditure 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1916 



$1500 00 



$1279 23 
220 77 



$1500 00 $1500 00 



Hovey's Water Extension 



Appropriation, March 1, 1915 






$1500 00 


Expenditure 




$1492 03 




Balance 




7 97 






$1500 00 


$1500 00 


New 


Barn 






Appropriation, March 1, 1915 






$1500 00 


Expenditure 




$1476 28 




Balance, Jan. 1, 1916 




23 72 





$1500 00 $1500 00 



FRANK L. COLE, Supt. 



36 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




FOR THE FISCAL TEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1916 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1917 



CONTENTS 



Almshouse Expenses 

Personal Property at 
Relief out of 
Repairs on 

Superintendent's Report 
Aiding Mothers 

Animal Inspector 

Appropriations, 1916 

Art Gallery 

Assessors' Report 

Assets 

Auditor's Report 

Board of Health 



64 

68 
68 
66 
69 
67 

85 

15 

144 
91 
93 

100 



42, 72 

Board of Public Works Appendix 

Sewer Sinking Funds 60 

Water Sinking Funds 60 

Bonds, Redemption of 59 

Brush Fires 39 

Building Laws, Report on 

Appendix 

Collector's Account 91 

Cornell Fund 86 

County Tax 53 

Dog Tax 53 

Dump, Care of 50 

Fire Department 36, 77 

Fire Alarm Box 38 

Finance Committee 101 

G. A. R. Post, 99 52 

Hay Scales 50 

Insurance 51 

Interest on Notes and Funds 56 

Liabilities 93 

Memorial Day 52 



Memorial Hall 


52, 


118 


Librarian's Report 




123 


Miscellaneous 




61 


Moth Superintendent's 


Report 


82 


Moth Suppression 




44 


New High School 




33 


Notes Given 




54 


Notes Paid 




55 


Overseers of the Poor 




63 


Police 


40 


,79 


Printing and Stationery 




43 


Punchard Free School, 
of Trustees 


Report 


115 


Retirement of Veterans 




52 


Schedule of Town Property 


87 


Schools 




26 


Selectmen's Report 




26 


Soldiers' Relief 




67 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


48, 83 


,84 


State Aid 




67 


State Tax 




53 


Street Lighting 




51 


Special Report Street L 


ighting 


109 


Summary Collector's Cash Acct. 


92 


Town House 




35 


Town Meetings 


7 


,21 


Town Officers 


4 


,34 


Town Warrant 




104 


Treasurer's Account 




93 


Tree Warden 




17 


Report of 




81 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1916 



Selectmen, Assessors and Overseers of the Poor 

HARRY M. EAMES, Chairman Term expires 1917 

CHARLES BOWMAN " " 1918 

WALTER S. DONALD, Secretary " " 1919 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
JOHN W. BELL 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

School Committee 

ALFRED E. STEARNS 
GEORGE A. CHRISTIE 
LILIAN BREWSTER 
BARTLETT H. HAYES 
HENRY A. BODWELL 
JOHN C. ANGUS 
MARY B. SMITH 
FREDERIC G. MOORE 
PHILIP F. RIPLEY 

Superintendent of Schools 
HENRY C. SANBORN 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 

THOMAS E. RHODES Term expires 1917 

WILLIS B. HODGKINS " " 1918 

ANDREW McTERNEN " " 1918 

BARNETT ROGERS " 1919 

CHARLES B. BALDWIN " " 1919 



rerrr 


i expires 


1917 


it 


(i 


1917 


a 


<< 


1917 


- 11 


i i 


1918 


i i 


i t 


1918 


a 


1 1 


1918 


It 


i < 


1919 


n 


i i 


1919 


1 1 


n 


1919 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 

FRANK L. COLE 

Engineers of Fire Department 

CHARLES S. BUCHAN, Chief WALTER I. MORSE, Clerk 

ALLAN SIMPSON 



Board of Health 

BANCROFT T. HAYNES 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. 



Term expires 1917 
1918 
1919 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Constables 




GEORGE W. MEARS 


Term expires 1917 


FRANK M. SMITH 


1917 


WILLIAM L. FRYE 


1917 


CHESTER H. LAWRENCE 


1917 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

NATHAN C. HAMBLIN Term expires 1917 

GEORGE F. SMITH 

ALFRED E. STEARNS 

BURTON S. FLAGG 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 

Rev. WILLIAM H. RYDEP 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 





1922 




1923 




1917 




1918 




1917 


. 


1920 



Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1919 

SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL HARRY H. NOYES 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY M. EAMES 

FRANK T. CARLTON 

5 



Auditors 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

NESBIT G. GLEASON 



Trustees of Cornell Fund 

JOHN C. ANGUS Term expires 1917 

ALLAN SIMPSON " " 1919 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER " " 1918 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
JOHN H. PLAYDON 

Tree Warden 
JOHN H. PLAYDON 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 

Registrars of Voters 

GEORGE W. FOSTER JOHN F. HURLEY 

PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Annual Town Meeting, March 6, 1916 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, SS.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, , Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the sixth day of March, 1916, 
at 6 o'clock a.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, 
one member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three 
members of the School Committee for three years, five Trustees 
of the Punchard Free School for three years, two members of 
the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the 
Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for 
one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year, one 
Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, seven Trustees of 
Spring Grove Cemetery for three years, Fence Viewers, Pound 
Keeper, and any other officers the town may determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be ap- 
propriated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, 
Relief out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent 
Children, Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay 
Scales, Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial 
Hall Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, 
Parks and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public 



Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water, Sewer, 
and Andover Loan Bonds, Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer 
Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State 
Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, 
Moth Department, Water Maintenance, Construction and Sink- 
ing Funds, and other town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will accept the provisions of 
Sections 1, 2, and 4, and the eight following sections of Chapter 
655, Acts of 1913, and appoint a committee of five (5) to be 
known as the Committee on Building Laws, said committee 
to submit a printed report to the voters on or before March 1, 
1917. That the sum of $25 be appropriated for the expenses of 
said committee, upon petition of the Selectmen. 

Article 5. — To see if the town will appropriate money for a 
fire alarm box to be located on South Main Street, near Gould 
Road, on petition of Harry W. Hay ward and others. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of two 
thousand ($2000) dollars for the extension of the macadam road 
on Salem Street and Jenkins Road, on petition of Everett W. 
Ricker and others. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will appropriate $3500 to 
macadam River Road from Martin Lydon's to Fish Brook and 
repair the River Road to the Tewksbury line, on petition of 
Samuel H. Boutwell and others. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will appropriate $1000 to repair 
Bailey Road to Tewksbury line, Pleasant Street to Boutwell 
Road, and Boutwell Road to River Road, on petition of James E. 
Dodge and others. 

Article 9. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$5000 to macadam Lowell Street, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 10. — To hear the report of the Special Committee, 
appointed March, 1915, relative to the erection of a new high 
school building, and to act upon its recommendations as fol- 
lows : — That the town shall vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) for the purpose 



of building and equipping a new high school building to be lo- 
cated on land in front of the present Punchard School building; 
to make any changes deemed necessary to preserve and use the 
present Punchard School building; and to make any necessary 
changes in the Central Heating Plant and its connections. 

That for the purpose of building and equipping said new high 
school building the Town Treasurer is hereby authorized to issue 
and sell bonds of the town to an amount not exceeding 8100,000, 
dated October 1, 1916, and payable $5000 thereof on the first 
of October in each of the years 1917-1936 inclusive, bearing in- 
terest at a rate not exceeding 4 per cent per annum payable 
semi-annually. The said bonds shall be denominated on their 
face Andover High School Loan 1916. 

That the Moderator appoint a committee of five in number 
to be known as the High School Building Committee, said 
committee to be authorized and instructed to obtain plans, 
make contracts, approve payments, and to do and act as may be 
necessary and proper to carry out all provisions of the foregoing 
vote. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money to extend the street lighting system up Prospect Hill 
Road, on petition of George M. Garland and others. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will vote to change the light 
now at the foot of Bancroft Road and Main Street to pole on 
opposite side of Bancroft Road, also place a new light opposite 
pumping station on Bancroft Road, on petition of Fred E. 
Cheever and others. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will vote to extend the water 
system on Bellevue Road from the Osgood Schoolhouse to the 
Boston & Maine track, a distance of about 2800 feet, on petition 
of Fred T. Harrington and others. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will vote to accept the Boulders 
so-called, near the Boston & Maine station, as a part of the Park 
system of the Town of Andover. 

Article 15. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year. 
Article 16. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 



Article 17. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 18. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 19. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 20. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 21. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock a.m., and may be closed 
at 2 o'clock p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting, as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, 
A.D. 1916. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



Andover, March 6, 1916 
Essex, SS. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said town to meet at the time and place and for 
the purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places, where bills and notices 
are usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 

10 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 6, 1916 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the town house in 
said Andover on Monday, the sixth day of March, 1916, at six 
o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and 
after reading a part of the warrant it was 

Voted, To dispense with the further reading of the warrant. 

Voted, To take up Articles 1 and 2 together. 

Voted, That the polls be closed at 2 o'clock p.m. 

Took up Articles 1 and 2 and proceeded to vote for Town 
Officers and on the Liquor License Question by the Australian 
ballot system. 

The ballot box was found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at 6 o'clock a.m. and closed at 2 o'clock p.m., 
as voted. The total number of ballots cast was 1104, ninety-one 
(91) of which were female ballots for School Committee only. 

The result of the balloting was as follows: — 

Moderator — One year: 

Alfred L. Ripley 848 

Blanks 165 

Town Clerk — One year : 

George A. Higgins 851 

Blanks 162 

Town Treasurer — One year : 

George A. Higgins 825 

Blanks 188 

11 



Selectmen — Three years : 

Louis G. Buck 288 

Walter S. Donald 660 

Blanks 65 

Assessor — Three years: 

Louis G. Buck 273 

Walter S. Donald 654 

Blanks 86 

Collector of Taxes — One year: 

John W. Bell 819 

Blanks 194 

School Committee — Three years: 

Frederic G. Moore 763 

Thomas E. Rhodes 452 

Philip F. Ripley 736 

Mary Byers Smith 722 

Blanks 639 

Trustees of Punchard Free School — Three years: 

Samuel H. Boutwell 729 

Frank T. Carlton 696 

Harry M. Eames 720 

Myron E. Gutterson 723 

Harry H. Noyes 687 

Blanks 1510 



Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund 


Commission 


Three years: 




Charles B. Baldwin 


674 


Edward W. Boutwell 


256 


Samuel P. Hulme 


314 


Barnett Rogers 


470 


Blanks 


312 


Board of Health — Three years: 




Charles E. Abbott 


766 


Blanks 


247 



12 



Auditors of Accounts — One year 



Walter H. Coleman 


481 


Nesbit G. Gleason 


568 


Edmond E. Hammond 


368 


David R. Lawson 


460 


John S. Robertson 


534 


Blanks 


628 


Constables — One year: 




Chester N. Lawrence 

V 


699 


George W. Mears 


671 


Frank M. Smith 


724 


Blanks 


945 


Trustee of Memorial Hall Library— 


-Seven years: 


Alfred E. Stearns 


779 


Blanks 


234 


Tree Warden — One year : 




John H. Playdon 


790 


Blanks 


223 



Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of Intoxicating 
Liquors in this town? 

Yes 285 

No 630 

Blanks 98 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted on by ballot 
and the check lists were used. 



REPORT OF PRECINCT CLERK 

Andover, Mass., March 6, 1916 
Polls open at 6 a.m. Ballot box registered 0000; ballot box 
registered when polls closed 1107; whole number of ballots 
received 1700; whole number of ballots cast 1104; number of 
regular ballots returned 687; number of female ballots received 
200; number of female ballots returned 109. 
Polls closed at 2 p.m. 

DANIEL A. COLLINS, 

Precinct Clerk 

13 



The Moderator declared: — 

Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Treasurer for one year. 

Walter S. Donald elected Selectman for three years. 

Walter S. Donald elected Assessor for three years. 

John W. Bell elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 

Frederic G. Moore elected School Committee for three years. 

Philip F. Ripley elected School Committee for three years. 

Mary Byers Smith elected School Committee for three years. 

Samuel H. Boutwell elected Trustee of Punchard Free School 
for three years. 

Frank T. Carlton elected Trustee of Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Harry M. Eames elected Trustee of Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Myron E. Gutterson elected Trustee of Punchard Free School 
for three years. 

Harry H. Xoyes elected Trustee of Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Charles B. Baldwin elected Board of Public Works and Sinking 
Fund Commission for three years. 

Barnett Rogers elected Board of Public Works and Sinking 
Fund Commission for three years. 

Charles E. Abbott elected Board of Health for three years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Nesbit G. Gleason elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

14 



Chester N. Lawrence elected Constable for one year. 
George W. Mears elected Constable for one year. 
Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

Alfred E. Stearns elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for seven years. 

John H. Playdon elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund — Allan Simpson, for three 
years. 

Chose Fence Viewers for one year — James Saunders, Raymond 
L. Buchan, George W. Mears. 

Chose Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery for three years — 
John L. Smith, Felix G. Haynes, Oliver W. Vennard, George D. 
Millett, John W. Bell, Daniel H. Poor, Walter I. Morse. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee — Barnett Rogers, Walter H. 
Coleman, Colver J. Stone, Charles B. Baldwin, Henry J. Gardner. 

And voted that Lighting Committee be authorized to make 
contract for Street Lighting for a term not exceeding three years. 

Chose Finance Committee for one year (appointed by the 
Moderator) — George Abbot, Samuel H. Boutwell, John H. Cam- 
pion, Walter M. Lamont, Henry W. Barnard. Chester W. 
Holland. 

Town Pound — Voted, That Town Barn and Barnyard be the 
Town Pound and that the Superintendent of the Town Farm 
be the keeper. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted, To appropriate the following stated sums of money: 

Almshouse Expenses S 4200 00 

Repairs on Almshouse 450 00 

Relief out of Almshouse 4300 00 

Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 500 00 



Amount carried forward S9450 00 

15 



Amount brought forward 

Board of Health 

Brush Fires 

Fire Department, running expense and new hose 

Hay Scales 

Highway Department, Sntfw, Sidewalks 

(Five hundred dollars to be spent under Better- 
ment Act, but if no applications are received 
before Sept. 1, it shall be at the disposal of the 
Board of Public Works) 
Also Street Railway Tax and Street Sprinkling 
(amounting last year to $5477.09) 

Insurance 

Insurance under Workmen's Compensation Act 

Interest 

Memorial Hall Library 

Memorial Day 

Post 99, G. A. R. 

Miscellaneous 

Parks and Playsteads 

(The Board of Public Works be instructed to 
make investigation and report some feasible 
plan to care for surplus water in Rogers Brook, 
Playstead and Park) 

Police 

Printing and Stationery 

Public Dump 

Retirement of Veterans, Acts 1912 

Redemption of Water Bonds 

Redemption Andover Loan Act Bonds 

Redemption Abbott Village Sewer Bonds 

Schools 

Sewer Department 

Maintenance 

Sinking Funds 
Soldiers' Relief 

Amount carried forward 



$9450 00 

2000 00 

800 00 

9200 00 

125 00 

28000 00 



950 00 

1600 00 

13000 00 

1800 00 

350 00 

100 00 

1700 00 

1500 00 



4500 


00 


1150 


00 


75 


00 


300 


00 


11000 


00 


5000 


00 


4505 


67 


47000 


00 


1800 


00 


1000 


00 


900 00 


$147805 67 



16 



Amount brought forward 


S147805 67 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


1000 00 


(And receipts from sale of lots) 




State Aid 


1500 00 


Street Lighting 


6500 00 


Town Officers 


6650 00 


Town House 


2000 00 


Tree Warden and Gypsy and Browntail 


Moth 


Department 


3500 00 


Water Department 




Maintenance 


11000 00 


Construction 


1500 00 


Sinking Funds 


750 00 


Committee on Building Laws (Article 4) 


25 00 


Fire Alarm Box (Article 5) 


350 00 


Macadam — River Road (Article 7) 


300 00 


Macadam — Lowell Street (Article 9) 


5000 00 


Total 


S187880 67 


Estimated County Tax 


16000 00 


Estimated State Tax 


23500 00 



S227380 67 

Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 3.24 p.m., To accept the provisions of Section I, 
of Chapter 655 Acts of 1913, and to appoint a committee of 
five (5) to be known as the Committee on Building Laws, said 
Committee to submit a printed report to the voters on or before 
March 1, 1917. The Moderator appointed Charles U. Bell 
(Chairman), Frank A. Buttrick, Granville K. Cutler, Walter I. 
Morse, and E. Barton Chapin. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 3.25 p.m., That the sum of $350 be appropriated for 
a Fire Alarm box to be located on South Main Street near Gould 
Road. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 3.27 p.m., To refer to the Board of Public Works. 

17 



Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 3.50 p.m., That the sum of $300 be appropriated to 
make such temporary repairs as may seem necessary on River 
Road. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 3.52 p.m., To refer to the Board of Public Works. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted at 3.54 p.m., That the town appropriate the sum of 
$5000.00, the amount to be used not to exceed $5000.00, or such 
an amount as shall be contributed severally by the State and 
County. 

Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 4.15 p.m., That the town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000.00) for the 
purpose of building and equipping a new high school building to 
be located on land in front of the present Punchard School 
building, to make any changes deemed necessary to preserve and 
use the present Punchard School building, and to make any 
necessary changes in the Central Heating Plant and its con- 
nections. 

That for the purpose of building and equipping said new high 
school building the Town Treasurer is hereby authorized to issue 
and sell bonds of the town to an amount not exceeding $100,000 
dated October 1, 1916, and payable $5000 thereof on the first 
of October in each of the years 1917-1936 inclusive, bearing 
interest at a rate not exceeding four (4) per cent per annum 
payable semi-annually. The said bonds shall be denominated 
on their face Andcver High School Loan 1916. 

That the Moderator appoint a committee of five in number to 
be known as the High School Building Committee, said Com- 
mittee to be authorized and instructed to obtain plans, make 
contracts, approve payments, and to do and act as may be 
necessary and proper to carry out all provisions of the fore- 
going vote. 

18 



The vote stood, Yea 298; Nay 0. The Moderator appointed 
the following committee: Burton S. Flagg, Henry A. Bodwell, 
John Alden, Harry M. Eames, and Edward V. French. 

It was also voted, that the committee, to whcm is entrusted 
the construction of the new high school building, may defer 
action, if upon consideration of plans and figures they deem it 
wise to do so. 

Took up Article 11. 

Voted, at 4.17 p.m., To refer to the Lighting Committee. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, at 4.18 p.m., To refer to the Lighting Committee. 

Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 4.28 p.m., THat the Board of Public Works be 
directed to petition the Legislature for authority to issue S 10,000 
of water bonds, the same to be available from time to time for 
extension of main service lines of the Andover Water System. 

Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 4.45 p.m., To accept the Boulders so-called, near the 
Boston & Maine station, as a part of the Park system of the town 
of Andover and that the selectmen be asked to inquire into the 
title and perfect it in the town's interest as far as possible. 

Took up Article 15. 

Voted, at 4.46 p.m., That the pay of the firemen be S75 per 
1 year. 

Took up Article 16. 

Voted, at 4.47 p.m., That the taxes be collected by the Collector 
and that he receive one per cent of all moneys collected and that 
interest be charged at the rate of six per cent per annum from 
October 15th on all taxes remaining unpaid after November 1st. 

Took up Article 17. 

19 



Voted, at 4.48 p.m., That the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1st, 1916, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts 
incurred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. 

Took up Article 18. 

Voted, at 4.50 p.m., That all unexpended balances be turned 
into the treasury, with the exception of $602.42 of the water 
construction appropriation of 1915. 

Took up Article 19. 

Voted, at 4.51 p.m., That the Report of the Town Officers be 
accepted. 

Took up Article 20. 

Voted, at 4.52 p.m., To raise by taxation $117,000 and also an 
amount sufficient to meet the State and County taxes. 

Took up Article 21. 

Voted, at 5.20 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officer's 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest, 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, 

Town Clerk 



20 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ESSEX, SS.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: — 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the twelfth day of June, 1916, at 
7.45 o'clock p.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To see if the town will vote to rescind that part of 
the vote of Article 1 of the warrant of the special Town Meeting 
held March 31, 1915, whereby the owners of estates situated in 
the territory embraced by a sewerage system, and benefited 
thereby, as shown on a plan of McClintock & Woodfall, dated 
June 8, 1898, on the west side of the Shawsheen River between 
Central and Stevens Streets, were assessed 75% of the cost, 
the Town to pay 25% of the cost. 

Article 2. — To see if the Town will vote to adopt as the method 
of assessment in the case of estates embraced in the portion of 
the sewerage system, and benefited thereby, shown on a plan of 
McClintock & Woodfall, dated June 8, 1898, on the west side 
of the Shawsheen River between Central and Stevens Streets, 
the following rate, as recommended by the Board of Public 
Works in their report of 1900: viz., Fifty (50) cents to be assessed 
on each foot of lot frontage, of estates on any street or w T ay 
wherever a sewer is constructed, five (5) mills per square foot 
upon the area of said estates, no estate to be assessed to a depth 
exceeding 120 feet from the front of same. Upon all corner lots 
assessments for lot frontage shall be levied as before stated, upon 
the whole frontage of such estates which abut on the street where 
sewer is first laid, upon the other street or streets or ways upon 
which such corner lots or estates abut, an exemption, as may be 
determined by the Board of Public Works, of not exceeding 

21 



sixty (60) feet of the frontage assessment shall be made on such 
streets or ways; and the assessments before provided shall be 
levied on all the remainder of the frontage on such streets or ways. 

Article 3. — To see if the town will vote to issue Water Loan 
Bonds or notes to the amount of $10,000 for the purpose of 
extending the main service lines of its water system as authorized 
by Chapter 262, Acts of 1916, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 4. — To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the 
Highway Department $2500.00 — the unexpended balance of 
$5 000.00 appropriated at the March meeting, for use on Lowell 
Street, said transfer being necessary owing to the unusual amount 
required in removing snow and sanding walks during the 
past winter, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000 for curbing on the west side of North Main Street from 
Stimson's Bridge to Poor Street, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 6. — To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Moderator to fill vacancies, caused by death, resignation, or 
inability to serve in any committees appointed by him at any 
legal town meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least, before the 
time of said meeting, as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-seventh day of May, 
A.D. 1916. 

HARRY M, EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of A ndover 
22 



'Andover, June 12, 1916 
Essex, SS. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said town to meet at the time and place and for 
the purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places, where bills and notices 
are usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the town house in 
said Andover on Monday, the twelfth day of June, 1916, at 
7.45 o'clock in the evening, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and 
read the warrant. 

Took up Article 1. 

Voted, at 8.39 p.m. That that part of the vote of Article 1 of 
the warrant of the Special Town Meeting held March 31, 1915, 
whereby owners of estates situated in the territory embraced by 
a sewerage system, and benefited thereby, as shown on a plan 
of McClintock & Woodfall, dated June 8, 1898, on the west side 
of the Shawsheen River between Central and Stevens Streets, 
were assessed 75% of the cost, the town to pay 25% of the cost, 
be rescinded. 

Took up Article 2. 

Voted, at 8.43 p.m., That the town adopt as the method of 
assessment in the case of estates embraced in the portion of the 
sewerage system, and benefited thereby, shown on a plan of 
McClintock & Woodfall, dated June 8, 1898, on the west side 
of the Shawsheen River between Central and Stevens Streets, 

23 



the following rate, as recommended by the Board of Public Works 
in their report of 1900, viz: — Fifty (50) cents to be assessed on 
each foot of lot frontage, of estates on any street or way where- 
ever a sewer is constructed, five (5) mills per square foot upon 
the area of said estates, no estate to be assessed to a depth 
exceeding 120 feet from the front of same. Upon all corner 
lots assessments for lot frontage shall be levied as before stated, 
upon the whole frontage of such estates which abut on the street 
where a sewer is first laid, upon the other street or streets or 
ways upon which such corner lots or estates abut, an exemption, 
as may be determined by the Board of Public Works, of not 
exceeding sixty (60) feet of the frontage assessment shall be made 
on such streets or ways, and the assessments before provided 
shall be levied on all the remainder of the frontage on such 
streets or ways. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted, at 9.10 p.m., That by virtue and in pursuance of 
Chapter 262 of the Acts of 1916 and for the purposes mentioned 
therein, the Town Treasurer is hereby authorized to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town in the aggregate principal amount of 
S10,000, to be dated July 1, 1916, and payable $2000 thereof on 
the first of July in each of the years 1917 to 1921 inclusive, 
bearing interest at a rate not exceeding four per cent per annum 
payable semi-annually, January first and July first. 

Said bonds or notes shall be denominated on the face thereof, 
"Andover Water Loan, Act of 1916", shall be signed by the 
Treasurer and countersigned by a majority of the Selectmen 
and be under the seal of the town. Principal and interest of said 
bonds or notes shall be payable in lawful money of the United 
States at such bank or trust company as the treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, shall elect. Said bonds or notes may 
be sold by said treasurer at public or private sale at not less than 
their par value, and shall be certified by a bank or trust company 
to be selected by the treasurer with the approval of the selectmen 
and contain such statements not inconsistent with this vote as 
the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen may 
determine. Yeas 116; Nays 0. 

24 



It was also voted that of the proceeds of the above bond sale 
the sum of S5000 be at the disposal of the Board of Public Works 
for extensions of the water system and that balance remain in 
the town treasury until otherwise ordered by the town. 

Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 9.22 p.m., That the Town transfer to the Highway 
Department $2500.00 — the unexpended balance of $5000.00 
appropriated at the March meeting, for use on Lowell Street, 
said transfer being necessary owing to the unusual amount 
required in removing snow and sanding walks during the past 
winter. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 9.31 p.m., That the Town appropriate the sum of 
$2000.00 for curbing on the west side of North Main Street from 
Stimson's Bridge to Poor Street. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 9.33 p.m., That the Town authorize the Moderator to 
fill vacancies, caused by death, resignation, or inability to serve 
in any committees appointed by him at any legal town meeting. 

Voted, at 9.34 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officer's 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest, 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, 

Town Clerk 



25 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 
Receipts from lunch counter 
Receipts from tuition and carfares 



Henry C. Sanborn, Superintendent 
J Francis Allison, Superintendent 
Nathan C. Hamblin, teaching 
Eugene V. Lovely, teaching 
Mary Smith, teaching 
Elizabeth M. Loftus, teaching 
Lois J. Reed, teaching 
Portia Clough, teaching 
Ruth K. Whiting, teaching 
Edna Simmons, teaching 
James H. Morss, teaching 
Eliza Spaulding, teaching 
Clara Putnam, teaching 
Etta M. Dodge, teaching 
Eleanor N. Erving, teaching 
Bernice B. Abbott, teaching 
Bernice G. Stimpson, teaching 
Cecelia A. Derrah, teaching 
Carolyn A. Dean, teaching 
Anne M. Downes, teaching 
Margaret Kimball, teaching 
Alice S. Coutts, teaching 
Katherine T. Hannon, teaching 

Amount carried forward 

26 





i 


$47000 00 






130 15 




i 


1318 71 




$48448 86 


$ 907 95 




1390 47 




1299 


98 




1269 


85 . 




834 


88 




809 


80 




619 


67 




256 


50 




393 


30 




276 


30 




726 


34 




391 


59 




335 


55 




707 


28 




649 


80 




609 


92 




649 


80 




634 


85 




513 


00 




514 


51 




120 


81 




277 


62 




634 


85 




$14824 62 





Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

Amount brought forward 

Cynthia Flint, teaching 
Joanna P. Simmons, teaching 
Margaret S. Hoyt, teaching 
Olive Waterhouse, teaching 
Frances Hobbs, teaching 
Elizabeth Otte, teaching 
E. Mae Chase, teaching 
Florence I. Abbott, teaching 
Adele H. Duval, teaching 
Florance M. Prevost, teaching 
Helen E. Hartford, teaching 
Sara G. Cummings, teaching 
Lena M. Clark, teaching 
Florence Dunton, teaching 
Jessie P. Brown, teaching 
Grace Hill, teaching 
Blanche Spaulding, teaching 
Marion Boehm, teaching 
Rubina S. Copeland, teaching 
Edith H. Johnson, teaching 
Helen W. Battles, teaching 
Emma L. Ward, teaching 
Emily F. Carleton, teaching 
Mildred Morris, teaching 
Eilene Powers, teaching 
Helen K. Hardy, teaching 
Ella S. Morrill, teaching 
Hallie M. Stimpson, teaching 
Pauline A. Meyer, teaching 
Vivian Taylor, teaching 
Daisy I. Barrett, teaching 
Grace A. Woodburn, school nurse 
William B. Hazleton, teaching 
Georgianna Lovejoy, clerk 

Amount carried forward 

27 





$48448 86 


$14824 62 


515 


15 . 


375 


89 


378 


35 


217 


05 


363 


17 


236 


85 


609 


92 


634 


85 


649 


80 


649 


80 


609 


92 


534 


91 


378 


35 


216 


95 


584 


84 


784 


72 


197 


40 


197 


40 


634 


85 


556 


87 


725 


04 


609 


91 


674 88 


535 


11 


534 


91 


509 


98 


619 67 


559 


76 


459 


82 


400 


14 


424 


77 


50 


00 


500 


08 


315 


20 


$31070 93 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

Amount brought forward 

Clara Putnam, teaching 

Margaret Kimball, teaching 

Irene Rutherford, teaching 

Alice S. Coutts, teaching 

Grace Thomas, teaching 

Beatrice Trombley, teaching 

Mrs. John Henderson, teaching 

Annie Mcintosh, matron 

Herbert L. White, janitor 

George Spickler, janitor 

William Flint, janitor 

Alfred Melanson, janitor 

James McGhie, janitor 

William McEwan, janitor 

Granville K. Cutler, janitor 

John Crowley, janitor 

James Eaton, janitor 

County of Essex, tuition 

Bay State St. Ry., transportation 

Boston & Maine R.R., transportation 

Lawrence Gas Co., lighting 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co. 

Leonard Saunders, police duty 

Andover Press, printing and supplies 

James J. Abbott, wood 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

E. E. Gray & Co., supplies 

George E. Hussey, supplies 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 

John W. Richardson, labor and lumber 

Neostyle Co., supplies 

Ginn & Co., supplies 

C. G. Merrill Co., supplies 

Amount earned forward 





$48448 86 


$31070 93 


217 


45 


96 


67 


35 


00 


25 


62 


20 


00 


10 


00 


2 


50 


222 


00 


1199 


64 


96 


00 


67 


60 


28 


40 


420 


00 


180 


00 


180 


00 


180 


00 


360 


00 


129 


57 


1060 


00 


793 


25 


193 


94 


S3 


73 


3 


50 


338> 


55 


46 


00 


91 


15 


4 


50 


6 


25 


339 


61 


4 


60 


90 


54 


12 


28 


94 


53 


55 


46 


$37759 


27 



28 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

Amount brought forward 

Milton Bradley Co., supplies 

American Book Co., supplies 

The Gregg Publishing Co., supplies 

A. N. Palmer Co., supplies 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies 

Edward E. Babb Co., supplies 

Royal Typewriter Co., supplies 

T. A. Holt Co., supplies 

Hiller & Co., supplies 

W. A. Allen, supplies 

Tyer Rubber Co., supplies 

City of Lowell, tuition 

City of Lawrence, tuition 

Charles H. Newton, transportation 

Alvah Wright, transportation 

George B. Petrie, labor 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, team hire 

J. F. Allison, sundries 

James H. Green, team hire 

H. R. Guild, sundries 

James Melanson, labor 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 
Ira Buxton, supplies 

S. K. Ames, supplies 

John A. Jenkins, supplies 

J. H. Campion & Co., supplies 

Lawrence Lumber Co., wood 

Chandler & Barber Co., supplies 

Valpey Brothers, supplies 

D. C. Heath & Co., supplies 
DeLuxe Manufacturing Co., supplies 
C. F. Emerson, teaming 
American Express Co. 

Wright's Express 

Amount carried forward 





$48448 86 


$37759 27 


159 


64 


118 


54 


1 


81 


51 


68 


495 


96 


701 


02 


1 


50 


51 


03 


2 


98 


42 


80 


13 


25 


100 


00 


59 


11 


432 


00 


540 


00 


2 


75 


73 


00 


34 


44 




75 


7 


50 


2 


50 


25 


45 


22 


45 


12 


80 


7 


39 


134 


70 


31 


46 


40 


78 


3 


84 


65 


72 


10 


00 


58 


25 


13 


64 


14 


55 


41092 


56 



29 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

Amount brought forward 

James Napier, truant officer 

Allyn & Bacon, supplies 

Robert Hutcheson, supplies 

William Knipe & Co. 

L. B. Philbrick, supplies 

Andover Coal Co., coal 

Albert W. Lowe, supplies 

Pyrene Manufacturing Co., supplies 

W. H. Sylvester, tuning pianos 

J. H. Playdon, plants 

David Farquhar, supplies 

Bausch Lomb Optical Co. 

Remington Typewriter Co., supplies 

Oliver Ditson Co., supplies 

Smith & Manning, supplies 

Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., supplies 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 

David M. May, police duty 

West Disinfecting Co., supplies 

E. V. Lovely, supplies 

No-Dust Co., supplies 

Charles P. Rea, labor 

J. E. Whiting, repairing 

James S. May, painting 

Allen F. Abbott, labor and lumber 

Edwin C. Moody, labor 

Richard C. York, labor 

Poor & Riley, supplies 

James McGhie, labor 

W. D. Walker, school physician 

Cross Coal Co., coal 

Board of Public Works, water 

Masury Young Co., supplies 

Wakefield Chemical Co., supplies 

Amount carried forward 





S48448 


$41092 56 


95 


24 


72 


03 




88 


53 


08 


8 


82 


1464 


86 


3 


75 


7 


20 


8 


75 


3 


00 


71 


25 


7 


86 


1 


17 


2 


43 




30 


1 


12 


360 


85 


1 


50 


50 


00 


2 


50 


35 


00 


2 


10 




75 


328 


25 


38 


65 


2 


00 


6 


00 


1 


10 


1 


00 


190 


00 


1634 


42 


264 


61 


46 


40 


12 


00 


$45871 


43 



30 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

Amount brought forward 

George E. Flint, wood 

John Shea, supplies 

Frank E. Dodge, labor 

Gordon Cannon, diplomas 

Mary L. Smith, carfares 

Chester H. Lawrence, police duty 

Knox & Morse Co., supplies 

Daisy I. Barrett, carfares 

Houghton Mifflin Co., supplies 

Benjamin Sanborn & Co., supplies 

Silver Burdett & Co., supplies 

Philip L. Hardy, labor 

E. McCabe & Co., supplies 

Wright Stafford & Son, supplies 

Henry C. Sanborn, supplies 

A. S. Barnes Co., supplies 

D. C. Mcintosh, supplies 

U. S. Geological Survey 

L. E. Knott Co., supplies 

George T. Johnson Co., supplies 

Frank H. Harvey, supplies 

Geo. H. Worcester & Co., supplies 

Wright & Ditson, supplies 

D. W. Pingree Co., wood 
Mitchell & Woodbury Co., supplies 
Cobb, Bates & Yerxa, supplies 
Herbert L. White, labor 

Arthur R. Lewis, school census 

E. W. Pitman Co., labor and lumber 
M. T. Walsh, labor 

H. B. Abbott, labor 
Alice V. Howell, 
Chester D. Abbott, supplies 
Lindsay & Young, supplies 

Amount carried forward 

31 



$48448 


86 


$45871 43 




6 50 




4 20 




55 10 




5 50 




20 00 




1 00 




40 




1 90 




149 75 




55 02 




77 59 




15 00 




1 15 




47 23 




31 65 




12 00 




22 80 




3 00 




37 13 




25 74 




7 87 




29 50 




14 00 




54 69 




30 13 




66 75 




10 00 




22 00 




36 75 




34 45 




1 38 




2 20 




34 14 




8 68 




$46796 63 





Appropriation March 6, 1916 




$48448 86 


Amount brought forward 


$46796 


63 


World Book Co., supplies 


1 


32 


Little Brown & Co., supplies 


8 


96 


Bride Grimes & Co., supplies 


14 


13 


Boston Music Co., supplies 


10 


00 


David O'Neill, supplies 


9 


60 


Sarah E. Riley, supplies 


1 


03 


Frances L. Otis 


3 


75 


Walter M. Lowney Co., supplies 


17 


64 


Manifold Supplies Co., supplies 


7 


00 


Atkinson Mentzer Co., supplies 


2 


78 


Charles A. Peck, supplies 


1 


00 


Underwood Typewriter Co., supplies 


172 


50 


H. J. Dalman Co., supplies 


9 


00 


Franklin H. Stacey, supplies 


17 


40 


L. A. Magoon, supplies 


9 


95 


C. H. Newton, labor 


10 


60 


Albert Scott, labor 


4 


50 


George Pillsbury, wood 


15 


00 


Benjamin Jaques, wood 


4 


00 


John Crowley, labor 


2 


00 


D. Donovan & Son, painting 


19 


20 


Bennett Brothers, supplies 


297 


50 


J. J. Daley, M.D. 


10 


00 


Charles E. Abbott, M.D. 


10 


00 


Edward C. Conroy, M.D. 


10 


00 


E. D. Lane, M.D. 


10 


00 


C. W. Scott, M.D. 


10 


00 


Percy J. Look, M.D. 


10 


00 


Total expenditures 


$47495 49 


Balance unexpended 


953 


37 



$48448 86 $48448 86 



32 



NEW HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 



Received from sale of bonds 
Received from premium and interest 

Fisher, Ripley & LeBoutillier, architects $ 3559 50 

J. H. Mendell Co., on account contract 27385 30 

Hollis, French & Allen Hubbard, engineers 900 21 

Suffolk Engraving Co. 14 01 

Bride Grimes & Co. 800 00 
Old Colony Trust Co., preparation of 

bonds 145 00 

James S. May, labor 5 00 



Total expenditures 
Balance unexpended 



32809 02 
69474 09 



$100000 00 
2283 11 



S102283 11 $102283 11 



33 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 S6650 00 

George A. Higgins, treasurer $ 600 00 

George A. Higgins, town clerk and clerk of 

selectmen 900 00 

Walter S. Donald, selectman, assessor and 

overseer of the poor 600 00 

Charles Bowman, selectman, assessor and 

overseer of the poor 600 00 

Harry M. Eames, chairman of selectmen, 

assessors and overseers of the poor 700 00 

Walter H. Coleman, auditor 50 00 

Nesbit G. Gleason, auditor 50 00 

J. L. Robertson, auditor 41.67 

David R. Lawson, auditor 8 33 

Alfred L. Ripley, moderator 10 00 

Daniel J. Murphy, town counsel 360.75 

Registrars of voters 141 00 

Election officers, town meeting 75 00 

Election officers, Precinct 1, Presidential 

and State primaries 122 00 

Election officers, Precinct 2, Presidential 

and State primaries 
Election officers, Precinct 1, State election 
Election officers, Precinct 2, State election 
Timothy Mahoney, checker at town meet- 
ing 
C. A. Hill, checker at town meeting 
Dr. J.J. Daly, town physician 
John VJ. Bell, collector 
Wm. C. Crowley, sealer of weights and 

measures 
Thomas F. Daily 



Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 



80 


00 


75 


00 


40 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


200 


00 


1677 


48 


180 


02 


5 


00 


$6522 


25 


127 


75 



$6650 00 S6650 00 



34 



TOWN HOUSE 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

C. A. Hill & Co., labor and supplies 

J. W. Richardson, labor 

Ira Buxton, labor and supplies 

William Knipe & Co., labor and supplies 

M. Steinert & Sons, piano 

Lawrence Gas Co., gas and electricity 

Sadie W. Hobbs, laundry 

George W. Mears, janitor 

Anderson & Bowman, supplies 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

T. A. Holt Co., supplies 

The O. L. Story Scenic Co., stage fixtures 

No Dust Co., supplies 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Leonard Saunders, police duty 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 

James S. May, painting 

Andover Coal Co., coal 

Charles P. Rea, moving ashes 

H. I. Dallman, supplies 

Frank H. Hardy, brush 

Benjamin Jaques, wood 

Crowley & Co., supplies 

Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 



$2000 00 



$ 24 09 


7 


75 


9 


00 


143 


13 


300 


00 


212 


01 


10 


49 


720 


00 




75 


14 


32 


10 


35 


92 


00 


8 


75 


1 


20 


15 


50 


2 


80 


9 


35 


297 


50 


1 


95 


8 


00 


6 


50 


6 


00 




25 


1901 


69 


98 


31 



$2000 00 S2000 00 



35 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation March 6, 1916 
Appropriation for new Fire Alarm Box 
Received from earnings of horses 
Received for sale of manure 
Received for rent of shed 
Chemical, Gasoline & Oil, B. F. Dept. 
Received from sale of old hose 



RUNNING EXPENSES 



Ivan S. Stedman, chauffeur 

Lester Hilton, chauffeur 

George Dick, chauffeur 

John Collins, driver 

John Haggerty, driver 

Lawrence Gas Co., gas and electricity 

E. W. Boutwell, hay 

T. A. Holt Co., grain 

American Express Co. 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

J. H. Campion & Co., supplies 

Myerscough & Buchan, repairs and supplies 

Board of Public Works, water 

Buchan & Francis, repairs and supplies 

Buchan & McNally, labor and supplies 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, supplies 

Andover Steam Laundry 

Tyer Rubber Co., supplies and blowing 

whistle 
H. M. Eames, hay 
Haynes & Juhlmann, grain 
Wm. Knipe & Co., repairs 

A mount carried forward 







S9200 00 






350 00 






1012 66 






35 00 






50 00 






52 00 






4 50 


7Q 


10704 16 


S1079 


00 




1079 


00 




975 


00 




819 


00 




819 00 




74 


89 




103 


09 




62 


71 




11 


95 




57 


95 




16 


07 




61 


84 




55 


97 




19 


50 




65 


54 




22 


53 




23 


14 




51 


08 




158 


30 




122 


00 
50 





S5678 06 



36 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

John Haggerty, use of telephone 

Smith & Manning, grain, etc. 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

E. McCabe & Co., repairs 

Dayton Fire Co., repairs on truck 

Cross Coal Co., soft coal 

Poor & Riley, grain 

P. J. Daly, grain 

Badger Fire Extinguisher Co. 

Anderson & Bowman, shoeing and repairs 

Morrison & O'Connell, shoeing and repairs 

Ira Buxton, care steamer 

Benjamin Jaques, wood 

A. M. Colby, painting 

Andover Coal Co., coal 

Dr. J. F. Winchester, veterinary services 

Crowley & Co., horse medicine 

C. S. Buchan, chief engineer 

Walter I. Morse, engineer 

Allan Simpson, engineer 

Payroll, Engine Co. No. 1 

Payroll, Engine Co. No. 2 

H. S. Neal, janitor at B. Vale 

James S. May, painting 

H. Clark, repairs on engine house, B. Vale 

G. S. Fuller, veterinary services 

John W. Richardson, labor 

Patrick Dowd, labor 

H. N. Cutting 

Gamewell Fire Alarm & Tel. Co., replacing 

Fire Alarm box burned out 
Gamewell Fire Alarm & Tel. Co., supplies 
Ira Buxton, labor and supplies 
American La France Engine Co., supplies 

Amount carried forward 





$10704 


16 


$5678 06 




30 


44 




45 


35 




85 


86 




2 


45 




12 


82 




12 


00 




141 


02 




36 


20 




2 


45 




55 


05 




51 


45 




100 


00 




4 


25 




18 


50 




322 


09 




8 


50 




4 


35 




150 


00 




100 


00 




100 


00 




1106 


25 




635 


00 




100 


00 




160 


00 




58 


27 




6 


50 




10 


23 




12 


00 
50 




150 


00 




55 


90 




52 


28 




26 


74 





$9334 51 



37 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 

G. P. Anderson & Co., supplies 

S. T. Shattuck & Son, teaming 

B. &. M. R. R., freight 

C. F. Emerson, carting 

Louis W. Bills, repairing fire whistle 

Berlin Spray Co., supplies 

McKinney Bros. & Co., horse 

J. E. Pitman, lumber and labor 

B. F. Mason, hay 

Walter Oldroyd, care horses 

D. A. Collins 

Total running expenses 





S10704 16 


S9334 


51 


2 


52 


10 


88 


1 


80 


7 


00 




90 


19 


00 


7 


50 


337 


50 


20 


85 


43 


13 


27 


50 


2 


40 



9815 49 



HOSE 



Boston Woven Hose Co., new hose 



520 23 



NEW 7 FIRE ALARM BOX 



Gamewell Fire Alarm & Tel. Co., fire 

alarm box 
C. A. Hill & Co., wire, labor and supplies 
Ira Buxton, labor and supplies 



Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 



125 


00 


168 


30 


68 


43 


10697 


45 


6 


71 



S10704 16 $10704 16 



38 



BRUSH FIRES 



Appropriation, March 6 


, 1916 




S800 00 


N. T. Batchelder et al 




S 32 


00 


Ira Buxton et al 




131 


50 


C. S. Buchan et al 




15 


00 


John A. Riley et al 




5 


50 


H. S. Neal et al 




9 


00 


A. P. Wright et al 




75 


00 


S. T. Shattuck & Son 




3 


00 


H. E. Wilcox et al 




5 


00 


Leonard Saunders 




3 


00 


W. H. Coleman & Son, 


chemicals 


19 


61 


C. L. Bailey 




13 


00 


Fire Dept., gas, oil and 


chemicals 


60 


10 


Total expenditure 


$371 


71 


Balance unexpended 




428 


29 



S800 00 S800 00 



39 



POLICE 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 
Received from Cann Estate 
Received from County for dogs 



Frank M. Smith, chief 

James Napier, regular police 

Daniel P. Webster, regular police 

William L. Frye, regular police 

Ralph Bruce, police duty, B. Vale 

Thomas F. Dailey, police duty, B. Vale 

M. L. Harwood 

Allen F. Abbott 

George C. Dunnells, police duty 

Frank Carse, police duty 

David May, police duty 

Percy J. Look, medical services 

Myerscough & Buchan, auto service 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, auto and teams 

Smith & Manning, supplies 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Leonard Saunders, police duty 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Ira Buxton, supplies 

O. P. Chase, supplies 

Sign Company 

Morrison & O'Connell, supplies 

Andover Steam Laundry 

W. H. Coleman & Son, auto service 

F. E. Hersom 

F. L. Cole 

American Express Co. 

Elmer H. Shattuck, police duty 

Amount carried forward 







S4500 


00 






63 


00 






35 


00 




4598 


00 


snoo 


00 






872 


00 






872 


00 






872 


00 






72 


00 






72 


00 






2 


00 






7 


00 






43 


85 






154 


15 






39 


50 






1 


50 






42 


25 






52 


00 

72 






53 


38 






69 


25 






4 


32 






2 


70 






1 


45 






1 


00 

75 






1 


04 






8 


50 






2 


00 






2 


25 
16 






2 


00 






S4351 


77 


4598 


00 



40 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount carried forward 

Chester H. Lawrence, police duty 
C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 
James W. Walker, police duty 
S. T. Shattuck & Son 
M. T. Welch, police duty 
Buchan & McNally 
William C. Brown, police duty 
J. A. Riley, police duty 
James H. Green, auto 
Charles F. Emerson, auto 
S. M. Spencer Mfg. Co. 
The Malcomb Co. 
Charles H. Newton, police duty 
Wm. L. Frye, carfare and expenses 
James Napier, food for prisoners 
Frank M. Smith, carfare and food for 
prisoners 

Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 





$4598 00 


$4351 


77 


12 


00 


2 


10 


29 


85 


5 


00 


79 


25 


5 


05 


20 


00 


2 


00 


1 


75 


4 


50 


1 


00 


3 


75 


25 


00 


9 


00 


2 


50 


32 


47 


4587 


19 


10 


81 



$4598 00 $4598 00 



41 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 




$2000 00 


Rutland State Sanitorium 


$ 146 


86 


T. Currie 


8 


00 


Frank Carse 


1 


25 


J. F. Winchester 


5 


00 


Lucy B. Abbott 


1 


50 


Charles H. Newton, inspecting meat 


177 


00 


Percy J. Look 


9 


10 


T. F. Morrissey & Son 


2 


00 


William Knipe & Co. 


28 


00 


Bancroft T. Haynes, salary 


50 


00 


Bancroft T. Haynes, expenses 


3 


42 


Patrick M. Conway 


1 


00 


Dr. H. H. Nevers 


27 


00 


Andover Steam Laundry 


1 


91 


Charles H. Newton, inspector of animals 


250 


00 


Andover Press, printing 


99 


95 


Citizen Printing Co. 


3 


75 


Franklin H. Stacey, milk inspector 


75 


00 


Franklin H. Stacey, Board of Health 


50 


00 


Joseph P. Nolan, inspecting plumbing 


98 


00 


Mass. Asso. Board of Health 


2 


50 


Franklin H. Stacey, supplies 


28 


73 


John W. McDermott 


50 


00 


George W. Chandler 


24 


00 


S. T. Shattuck & Son 


1 


00 


Lawrence Tuberculosis Hospital 


27 


15 


Charles E. Abbott 


58 


00 


Total expenditure 


1230 


02 


Balance unexpended 


769 98 



$2000 00 $2000 00 



42 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

Carter Ink Co., ink 

Hobbs and Warren, supplies 

Andover Press, printing and supplies 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., supplies 

P. B. Murphy, printing 

Henry W. Meek, printing 

A. W. Brownell, supplies 

John H. McDonald, envelopes 

H. M. Meserve, supplies 

Wakefield Daily Item, printing 

Auto List Pub. Co., auto lists 

Review and Record Co. 

Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 





$1150 00 


$ 1 


25 


30 


62 


764 


05 


18 


85 


3 


75 


2 


57 


7 


50 


138 


34 


4 


55 




75 


53 


00 


5 


00 


$1030 


23 


119 


77 



$1150 00 $1150 00 



43 



SUPPRESSION OF BROWNTAIL AND 

GYPSY MOTHS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 
Private work 
Sale of lead. etc. 



Edward Berry, labor 
Harry Hayward, labor 
John Stewart, labor 
Jesse Hamilton, labor 
William Hatch, labor 
Joseph Dumont, labor 
Bert Estey, labor 
Herbert Rose, labor 
J. Howard Baker, labor 
Pat Tucker, labor 
A. Clement, labor 
Timothy Donovan, labor 
George Moriarty, labor 
Dollar Tetreau, labor 
Hugh McGovern, labor 
Lester Blair, labor 
Richard Stack, labor 
John Stack, labor 
Charles Shattuck, labor 
Frank Carse, labor 
Leonard York, labor 
R. York, labor 
Martin Doherty, labor 
R. Kibbee, labor 

Amount carried forward 





S3250 00 




1652 45 




45 25 




S4947 70 


S575 26 




172 19 




236 15 




241 45 




295 08 




6 75 




6 75 


\ 


34 04 




76 23 




81 57 




12 10 




39 66 




28 69 




31 21 




30 94 




45 56 




33 43 




2 50 




50 34 




84 




27 00 




37 62 




45 86 




4 38 





$2115 60 



44 



Appropriation, and Receipts 






$4947 70 


Amount brought forward 


2115 


60 




J. White, labor 


2 


50 




Joe Love, labor 


5 


06 




Thomas Bollie, labor 


2 


81 




Augustus Johnson, labor 


54 


00 




William Ryan, labor 


29 


54 




Frank Spencer, labor 


9 


00 




Hosea Marco, labor 


17 


43 




F. MacDonald, labor 


45 


00 




Joseph Peters, labor 


37 


97 




Michael Shea, labor 


6 


75 




Guy Webster, labor 


17 


00 




Austin Riley, labor 


20 


25 




Dominick Palosky, labor 


5 


06 




T. Davis, labor 


55 


00 




Bert Morrill, labor 


119 


46 




Maurice Jackson, labor 


2 


25 




L. Driscoll, labor 


9 


56 




F. Keefe, labor 


111 


93 




Patrick Conway, labor 


21 


87 




R. Baker, labor 




50 




S. Jacobs, labor 


2 


97 




Ralph Berry, labor 


15 


75 




George Finickam, labor 


20 


25 




Richard Sherry, labor 


81 


87 




Harold Larkin, labor 


92 


18 




F. Keefe, labor 


28 


87 




J. Ingalls, labor 


5 


94 




Mr. Cohan 


12 


50 




S. T. Shattuck & Son, teaming and storage 


247 


77 




Ira Buxton, repairs and supplies 


25 


95 




W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 


62 


09 




American Express Co. 


3 


29 




Buchan & McNally, supplies 


1 


43 




Andover Press, printing 




65 




Amount carried forward 


S3 289 


05 





45 



Appropriation and Receipts $4947 70 

Amount brought forward $3289 05 

Martin Doherty, labor 39 50 

Anderson & Bowman, repairs 1 25 

Freeman Abbott, hauling sprayer 290 50 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 45 96 

Thos. F. Morrissey & Son, team 1 50 

The Grasseli Chemical Co., lead 45 25 

Morrison & O'Connell, repairs 1 25 

Fire Department, chemicals 3 50 

J. H. Playdon, use of team 24 00 

J. H. Playdon, labor 201 00 
State Forestry Dept., tools and arsenate 

of lead 820 20 

Total expenditure 4763 96 

Balance unexpended 183 74 



$4947 70 S4947 70 



46 



TREE WARDEN 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 $250 00 

Ira Buxton, sharpening saws 

A. P. Wright, labor 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Follansbee Nursery, trees 

J. H. Playdon, Salary 1915-16 

T. F. Morrissey & Son 

Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 



1 


95 


2 


00 


9 


20 


74 


75 


100 


00 


1 


00 


188 


90 


61 


10 



$250 00 $250 00 



47 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 
Received from sale of lots 



Frederick Wiss, labor 

Horace Hale Smith, plans 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, teams 

Anderson & Bowman, labor 

Charles F. Emerson, labor and team 

Oliver W. Vennard 

Andover Press, printing 

E. F. Conkey, team and labor 

J. H. Playdon, plants and shrubs 

Smith & Manning, supplies 

Charles E. Shorten, labor 

Christopher Shorten, labor 

Alexander Clement, labor 

Estate O. W. Vennard 

Arthur Herbert, labor 

George Finickam, labor 

Dan Barbarian, plowing 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

James Abbott, teams and labor 

Charles Roundhead, labor 

Walter Shorten, labor 

A. M. Colby, signs 

William McNeal, labor 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

S. T. Shattuck & Son 

Fire Department, use of horses 

Amount carried forward 







S1000 00 






545 80 




SI 545 80 


S 473 46 




15 


00 




3 


50 




7 


60 




6 


00 




10 


13 




18 


00 




2 


50 




17 


25 




1 


50 




182 


74 




179 


45 




58 


47 




251 


10 




6 


50 




13 


50 




54 


90 




74 


39 




36 


00 




3 


50 




17 


50 




2 


50 




8 


00 




20 


00 




24 


00 




11 


20 




S1498 


69 





48 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

F. H. Foster 

Colver J. Stone, deeds for lots 

Everett Lundgren 


$1498 69 

4 00 
11 25 
20 00 


$1545 80 


Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 


$1533 94 
11 86 





$1545 80 $1545 80 



49 



PUBLIC DUMP 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 $75 00 

Olof Benson, care dump $75 00 



HAY SCALES 



Total expenditure $75 00 $75 00 



Appropriation, March 6, 

Gray & Kendall, repairs 
Ira Buxton, )veigher 


1916 


$ 6 02 
100 00 


$125 00 


Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 


106 02 

18 98 





S125 00 $125 00 



50 



INSURANCE 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 




$ 950 00 


For Workmen's Compensation 




1600 00 


Dividends 




196 46 


Transferred from Miscellaneous 




135 00 


Smart & Flagg, Agents 


S2881 46 





$2881 46 $2881 46 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 
Lawrence Gas Co. 
Balance unexpended 



$6164 25 
335 75 



S6500 00 



$6500 00 $6500 00 



51 



RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 

Appropriation March 6, 1916 $300 00 

Paid under Chap. 447, Acts 1912 $300 00 



G. A. R. POST 99 



MEMORIAL DAY 



S300 00 $300 00 



Appropriation, Chap. 62 Acts 1913 $100 00 

Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster $100 00 



$100 00 $100 00 



Appropriation March 6, 1916 $350 00 

Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster S350 00 



Total expenditure S350 00 $350 00 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Appropriation March 6, 1916 $1800 00 

F. S. Boutwell, Treasurer Memorial Hall 

Library $1800 00 



Total expenditure $1800 00 $1800 00 

52 



COUNTY TAX 

Andover's proportion of County Tax 14374 46 

Paid David I. Robinson, County Treas. $14374 46 



$14374 46 $14374 46 



STATE TAX 



Andover's proportion of State and Highway Tax $18533 44 

Paid Charles L. Burrill, State Treas. $18533 44 



18533 44 $18533 44 



DOG TAX 



Received from County Treas. $596 44 

Paid F. S. Boutwell, Treas. Memorial Hall $596 44 



$596 44 $596 44 



53 



NOTES GIVEN 



Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 31 $10000 00 

Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 32 10000 00 

Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 33 10000 00 

Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 34 10000 00 

Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 35 5000 00 

Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 36 5000 00 

Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 37 15000 00 

Mar. 9, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 38 15000 00 

$80000 00 



54 



NOTES PAID 



Nov. 11, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 31 $10000 00 

Nov. 11, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 32 10000 00 

Nov. 17, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 33 10000 00 

Nov. 17, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 34 10000 00 

Dec. 8, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 35 5000 00 

Dec. 8, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 36 5000 00 

Dec. 8, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 37 15000 00 

Dec. 8, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 38 15000 00 
Total amount paid during year $80000 00 



55 



INTEREST 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 $13000 00 

Received as Interest on Deposits 1194 84 



$14194 84 
Feb. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Water coupon $ 20 00 

Feb. 25, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

16 Water coupons 320 00 
Mar. 11, Bureau of Statistics, Com. of 

Mass., Notes No. 31 to 38 

inclusive 16 00 

Mar. 13, Andover National Bank, Int. 
on Notes No. 31 to 38 inclu- 
sive 

Mar. 18, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 
3 Sewer coupons 

Mar. 29, Old Colony Trust Co., 25 
Water coupons 

Mar. 29, Old Colony Trust Co., 10 Sewer 
coupons 

April 6, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

17 Water coupons at 173^2 
April 21, Old Colony Trust Co., 9 Water 

coupons 
April 21, Old Colony Trust Co., 25 Ando- 
ver Loan Act 
May 11, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 20 

Water coupons 
June 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 10 

Water coupons 
June 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 36 

Water coupons at 173^ 

Amount carried forward $4879 30 

56 



1555 


80 


60 


00 


500 


00 


200 


00 


297 


50 


180 


00 


500 


00 


400 


00 


200 


00 


630 


00 



Appropriation and Receipts 
A mount brought forward 

June 7, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 24 

Water coupons 
June 8, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 12 

Water coupons 
June 8, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 28 

Sewer coupons 

June 22, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 2 

Sewer coupons 
June 22, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 1 

Water coupon 

June 23, Old Colony Trust Co., 60 Sewer 

coupons 
July 29, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 1 

Sewer coupon 
July 29, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 2 

Water coupons 
Aug. 1, Old Colony Trust Co., 16 

Water coupons 
Sept. 2, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 1 

Sewer coupon 
Sept. 23, Old Colony Trust Co., 10 Sewer 

coupons 
Sept. 23, Old Colony Trust Co., 24 

Water coupons 

Oct. 19, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 16 
Water coupons at 173^ 

Oct. 25, Old Colony Trust Co., 8 Water 
coupons at 173^ 

Oct. 25, Old Colony Trust Co., 25 Ando- 
ver Loan Act coupons 

Nov. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 20 
Water coupons 



Amount carried forward $9839 30 

57 





S14194 84 


S4879 30 


480 


00 


240 


00 


560 


00 


40 


00 


20 


00 


1200 


00 


20 


00 


40 


00 


320 


00 


20 


00 


200 


00 


480 


00 


280 


00 


160 


00 


500 


00 


400 


00 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward $9839 30 

Nov. 17, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 2 

Water coupons 40 00 

Dec. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 23 

Water coupons at 173^ 577 50 

Dec. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 15 

Water coupons at 17^ 300 00 

Dec. 8, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 26 

Water coupons at 17^ 520 00 

Dec. 8, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 9 

Sewer coupons at 173^ 180 00 

Dec. 14, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 12 

Water coupons at 17^ 240 00 

Dec. 14, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 3 

Sewer coupons at 17J/2 60 00 

Dec. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., paid 10 

Water coupons at 17J^ 200 00 

Dec. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 70 Sewer 

coupons 1400 00 



$14194 84 



Jan. Geo. A. Higgins, 
Sewer coupons 

Jan. Geo. A. Higgins, 
Water coupon 


Treas., 
Treas., 


, paid 
, paid 


8 
1 


160 00 
20 00 


Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 


13536 80 
658 04 



$14194 84 $14194 84 



58 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Appropriations 

For Redemption of Water Bonds $11000 00 

For Redemption Andover Loan Act bonds 5000 00 

For Redemption Abbott Village Sewer bonds 4505 67 

Received for premium and interest on A.V.S. bonds 494 33 



$21000 00 



Mar. 29, Old Colony Trust Co., 1 Water 

Water bond, No. 286 $1000 00 

April 6, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 1 

Water bond, No. 214 1000 00 

April 21, Old Colony Trust Co., 1 Water 

bond, No. 332 1000 00 

June 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 2 

Water bonds, Nos. 238, 248 2000 00 

June 23, Old Colony Trust Co., 5 Sewer 

bonds, Nos. 141 to 145 inc. 5000 00 

Aug. 10, Old Colony Trust Co., 1 Water 

bond, No. 315 1000 00 

Oct. 25, Old Colony Trust Co., 5 Ando- 
ver Loan Act bonds, Nos. 15 
to 20 5000 00 

Nov. 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 5 

Water bonds, Nos. 131 to 135 5000 00 



Total expenditure $21000 00 $21000 00 



59 



SEWER SINKING FUNDS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 S1000 00 

Dec. 1, Willis B. Hodgkins, Treasurer 

Sinking Fund S1000 00 



Total expenditure S1000 00 S1000 00 



WATER SINKING FUNDS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 S750 00 

Dec. 1, Willis B. Hodgkins, Treasurer 

Sinking Funds S750 00 



Total expenditure S750 00 $750 00 



60 



MISCELLANEOUS 



9 


00 


15 


85 


20 


50 


8 


00 


3 


00 


1 


15 


8 


99 


2 


25 


27 


00 




85 


18 


00 




75 


4 


00 


10 


75 


225 


00 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 $1700 00 

Conlin & Ryan, return of deaths 

W. & L. E. Gurley, supplies for scales 

A. M. Colby, painting signs 

George H. Leek, photos Prospect Hill road 

E. F. Conkey, cleaning sanitary, B. Vale 

Treat Hardware and Supply Co. 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

H. M. Meserve & Co. 

Edith P. Sellars, clerical work 

American Express Co. 
. Myerscough & Buchan, auto for registrars 
of voters 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

John Franklin, plan 

Reynolds Mfg. Co. 

Patrick Cronin, settlement for injuries 

Lilla D. Stott, return of transfers of real 

estate 51 00 

John A. Riley, attendance on board of 
registrars 

James S. May 

Patrick J. Barrett 

Carfare and expense of selectmen attend- 
ing hearings 

Andover National Bank, safe deposit box 

C. W. Flanders, lunch for precinct officers 

John H. McDonald, postomce box 

Benjamin Jaques 

Thomas F. Dailey, services at elections 

H. F. Dearborn, return of births 

Walter I. Morse 

C. Madeleine Hewes, copying valuation 
books 

Amount carried forward $556 58 

61 



20 


35 


3 


00 


3 


00 


25 


54 


5 


00 


4 


00 


2 


40 


3 


00 


10 


00 


1 


75 


3 


85 


68 


60 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

Amount brought forward 

John W. Richardson, carpenter work on 

Old Schoolhouse, B. Vale 
Dr. Geo. W. Dow, services in Boland case 
B.M.R.R., rental of Boulders 
T. F. Morrissey & Son 
B. & M. R.R., railroad tickets 
M.J. Mahoney, return of deaths 
Dr. W. D. Walker, return of births 
Dr. J.J. Daly, return of deaths 
Dr. E. D. Lane, return of births » 
Dr. Percy J. Look, return of births 
Dr. C. E. Abbott, return of births 
Dr. E. C. Conroy, return of births 
Everett M. Lundgren, return of deaths 
Dr. C. W. Scott, return of deaths 
W. F. Gledhill, fish warden 
E. W. Prescott, corporation returns 
Ira B, Hill, field driver 
George A. Higgins, town clerk, sundry 

expenses 

Total expenditure 
Transferred to Water Maintenance 
Transferred to Insurance 
Balance unexpended 



$1700 00 



$556 58 



41 


05 


15 


00 


1 


00 


23 


00 


30 


00 


2 


50 


8 


25 


8 


00 


6 


50 


5 


50 


1 


25 




75 


23 


00 




50 


10 


00 


17 


50 


25 


00 


8 


50 


783 


88 


400 


00 


135 


00 


381 


12 



$1700 00 $1700 00 



62 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The Overseers of the Poor submit the following report for the 
year ending December 31, 1916. 

Your Overseers can add but little to the previous reports 
relating to the general condition and management of our alms- 
house. Those who have visited the house during the past year 
could but be impressed by the character and condition of our 
present inmates, most of whom have long since passed the 
allotted three score years and ten, four being eighty or over, 
four seventy to eighty and four sixty to seventy, and naturally 
with the infirmities attendant upon advancing years the attention 
necessary for their proper care increases day by day, but we have 
always found our superintendent and matron ever willing and 
ready to aid and cheer those under their care. 

Your Overseers appreciate the aid rendered by our towns- 
people, in brightening the hours of those who have been less 
fortunate. The organ and victrola, so kindly donated, have 
afforded many hours of pleasure and enjoyment to our little 
family at the Andover Home. 

During the past year, part of the main house has been 
shingled, rooms papered and painted, together with general 
repairs on the barn and outbuildings. 

For Almshouse expenses we would ask the sum of $4200 be 
appropriated; for repairs, S250; to meet the requirements of 
Chapter 763, Acts of 1913, an act for suitably aiding mothers 
with dependent children, the sum of S800. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Overseers of the Poor 
63 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSE 



Appropriation, March 6. 1916 
Receipts from Town Farm 



Smith & Manning, groceries 

Reid & Hughes, dry goods 

F. C. Small Co., groceries 

T. A. Holt Co., groceries 

S. K. Ames, supplies 

George C. Dunnells, fish 

J. P. Wakefield, provisions 

Robert Hutcheson, fish 

Albert W. Lowe, drugs 

D. F. Chase, supplies 

Hiller & Co., supplies 

Treat Hardware Co., supplies 

H. Bruckman, grain 

Frank L. Cole, clothing 

Lawrence Gas Co. 

J. H. Campion & Co., groceries 

Yalpey Bros., provisions 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

Walter I. Morse, hardware 

William A. Nelson, supplies 

Beach Soap Co., supplies 

H. J. Furneaux, provisions 

M. L. Harwood, supplies 

Family Shoe Store, shoes 

Charles Robinovitz, shoes and repairing 

International Stock Food Co., supplies 

Anderson & Bowman, blacksmith work 

A. M. Colby, supplies 

Robertson & Sutherland Co.. dry goods 

Malcolm B. McTernen, dentistry 

J. P. West, supplies 

A mount carried forward 





S4200 00 




843 50 




5043 50 


S 186 46 




138 98 




44 18 




679 91 




52 00 




11 17 




14 39 




63 39 




32 56 




192 44 




18 24 




11 00 




186 04 




9 77 




170 04 




93 43 




111 84 




12 S3 




14 64 




10 50 




4 90 




35 17 




44 87 




8 66 




10 20 




10 50 




33 60 




45 70 




45 48 




2 00 




36 82 





S2331 71 



64 



Appropriation and Receipts S5043 50 

Amount brought forward S2331 71 

O. P. Chase, supplies 18 15 

Ira Buxton, supplies 8 35 

Crowley & Co., drugs 20 45 

Peter Henderson & Co., seeds and bulbs 4 70 

J. E. Whiting 4 00 

Everett M. Lundgren, funeral expenses 30 00 

Providence Churning Co., supplies 31 50 

Frank L. Holt, labor 23 75 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co. 1 60 

Armour & Co., supplies 6 60 

J. H. Playdon, plants 3 30 

George A. Brown, shoes 10 15 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 81 94 

Lindsay & Young, provisions 72 39 

Tyer Rubber Co., supplies 2 25 

O. W. Vennard, opening grave 5 00 

Alvin Jenkins, pasturing heifer 6 00 

Board of Public Works, water 75 45 

Frank E. Whiting, supplies 2 50 

Peoples Ice Co., ice 50 00 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, straw 12 26 

A. Basso, supplies' 13 10 

T. H. Lane & Son, clothing 35 40 

Andover Coal Co., coal 340 00 

Walter C. Boyce, pasturing heifer 15 00 

Fred A. Swanton, superintendent 800 00 

Isabel Sinclair, labor 102 00 

Bertha Jansson, labor 271 00 

Annie Keenan, labor 72 00 

Mrs. M. McEwan, labor 5 00 - 

Agnes Keeape, labor 195 00 

Jhon Le Leasson, labor 195 00 

Gustavus Johnson, labor 125 00 

Ellen Blair, labor 8 37 

Amount carried forward S4978 92 

65 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

Jean Milne, labor 
Robina Mitchell, labor 
Mary Heald, labor 

Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 





$5043 50 


$4978 92 




25 00 




4 00 




22 00 




5029 92 




13 58 





$5043 50 $5043 50 



ALMSHOUSE REPAIRS 

Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

George D. Ward, labor 

Walter I. Morse, hardware 

George H. Pearce, paper and labor 

D. W. Pingree Co., supplies 

Board of Public Works, supplies 

J. E. Pitman, lumber 

William Knipe & Co., labor and supplies 

Anderson & Bowman, labor and supplies 

George Dufton, lumber and labor 

Buchan & McNally, labor and supplies 

Eastman & Blyth, paper 

Treat Hardware and Supply Co., supplies 

A. M. Colby, supplies 

Frank E. Dodge labor and supplies 

Morrison & O'Connell, labor and supplies 



Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 



8 450 00 



S 20 


00 


50 


70 


66 


54 


18 


42 


4 


30 


13 


74 


9 


50 


' 7 


00 


126 


80 


19 


40 


7 


96 


1 


64 


15 


65 


32 


80 


12 


00 


406 


45 


43 


55 



8450 00 $450 00 



66 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916 


S 900 00 


Total expenditure 


S739 84 


Balance unexpended 


160 16 



S900 00 S900 00 



STATE AID 




Appropriation, March 6, 1916 


S1500 00 


Total expenditure 


$1141 74 


Balance unexpended 


358 26 



$1500 00 $1500 00 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Appropriation, March 6, 1916 S500 00 

Town cases $516 00 

On account other cities 180 00 

On account of State 108 00 



Total expenditure 








804 00 


Due Town from other 


cities 


S120 


00 




Due Town from State 




206 


00 




Reimbursed by State 




132 


00 


458 00 








Xet expenditure 


346 00 


Unexpended 








154 00 



S500 00 S500 00 
67 



RELIEF OUT OF ALMSHOUSE 

Appropriation, March 6, 1916 

Paid out of almshouse 

Paid other cities and towns 

Paid State 

Paid on account other cities and towns 

Paid on account State 

Total expenditure 

Due Town from other cities and 

towns S405 47 

Due Tow r n from State 125 80 



$4 


300 00 


S3512 72 




361 67 




23 50 




405 47 




125 80 




4429 16 





Net expenditure 
Unexpended 



531 27 

3897 89 
402 11 



S4300 00 $4300 00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMSHOUSE 



House furniture 
Clothing 
Farm stock 
Farm tools 
Farm produce 
Fuel 
Provisions 



SI 200 00 


400 


00 


978 


00 


350 


00 


485 


00 


418 


00 


150 


00 



S3981 00 



68 



ALMSHOUSE SUPERINTENDENT'S 

REPORT 



Number of inmates in the almshouse January 1, 1916 14 

Number admitted during the year 5 

Average number for the year 16 

Number discharged 1 

Number died 2 

Number sent to Tewksbury 1 

Number sent to Danvers 1 

Number in almshouse January 1, 1917 14 

Number over eighty years of age 4 

Number between seventy and eighty 4 

Number between sixty and seventy 4 

Number under sixty 2 

Tramps fed 2 



FARM CASH REPORT 



Received for 






Cows and boarding cows 


S 361 


00 


Bulls and service of bulls 


98 


00 


Calves 


7 


00 


Milk 


51 


24 


Pork and pigs 


101 


91 


Eggs 


81 


32 


Chickens 


13 


50 


Boarding Miss Buckley 


208 


00 


Beans 


10 


00 


Apples 


4 


78 


Vegetables 


13 


75 


Use of cart 


5 


00 


Lumber 


50 


00 


Due for hay 


34 


19 

S1039 69 



69 



Paid for 

Cows $ 120 00 

Calves 5 00 

Chickens 37 00 

Due for hay 34 19 



196 19 
Cash to balance 843 50 



$1039 69 $1039 69 
FRED A. SWANTON, Superintendent 



70 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual report. 
Number of male polls assessed 



2089 



Personal estate 


S2745413 


00 




Real estate 


6159975 


00 


S8905388 00 


Poll tax 


S 4178 


00 




Tax on personal property- 


48045 


86 




Tax on real estate 


107801 


12 


160024 98 


Rate of taxation per SI 000 


S17.50 




Number of 








Horses assessed 






569 


Cows assessed 






931 


Cattle other than cows 


assessed 




314 


Sheep assessed 






75 


Swine assessed 






192 


Fowl assessed 






13025 


Dwellings assessed 






1584 


Acres of land assessed 






18112 



HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

A ssessors of A ndover 



71 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



We do hereby submit our annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1916. 

It is with a great deal of satisfaction that we note almost a 
50% decrease in the number of cases of contagious diseases, 
and this in view of the fact that all seem to realize more and more 
each year the importance of reporting all cases that may come 
to their attention. 

During the year 1916 there were 164 cases reported, compared 
to 319 for the year 1915. The first six months of the year 1916 
there were 133 cases compared to 283 in 1915. The last six 
months of 1916 there were 31 cases, compared with 36 in 1915. 

The cases during the year were classified as follows, compared 
with 1915:— 





1915 


1916 




1915 


1916 


Chicken Pox 


40 


5 


Mumps 


5 


34 


Diphtheria 


27 


12 


Scarlet Fever 


39 


5 


German Measles 


106 


2 


Tuberculosis 


19 


12 


Ophthalmia 


2 


1 


Typhoid Fever 


2 


6 


Measles 


63 


9 


Whooping Cough 


12 


74 


Infantile Paralysis 




2 


Spinal Meningitis 


3 


2 



During the past year there have been thirteen deaths caused 
by communicable diseases. 

Tuberculosis 7 

W T hooping Cough 3 

Scarlet Fever 1 

Typhoid Fever 2 



13 

Andover has been very fortunate in regard to the cases of 
Infantile Paralysis (Anterior Poliomyelitis), having had but two 
cases, with no deaths. The first case was at Phillips Academy, 
the patient being immediately transferred to the Maiden Con- 

72 



tagious Hospital, while a strict quarantine of his associates was 
maintained for two weeks. The other case was very mild, the 
child mingling with other children during the first part of the 
illness or until paralysis had developed. As there were no 
secondary cases it would seem that the danger of contagion from 
personal contact and association must be very slight. 

On the recommendation of this Board and the School Physician 
the school opening was delayed two weeks, and at that time a 
careful inspection of each pupil was made by the School Physician, 
assisted by the local physicians. 

It would perhaps be well to say here that parents should 
realize that Measles and Whooping Cough are fully as dangerous 
in their after effects as the dreaded Infantile Paralysis. Many 
cases of Tuberculosis, Asthma, Bronchitis and Pneumonia are 
attributed to these causes, and it is decidedly wrong to think 
lightly of these diseases, believing that the child will have them 
eventually and that it is better to have it over with as soon as 
possible. This practice should be heartily condemned. 

The Rules and Regulations of the Board of Health have this 
year been carefully revised and extended, and the same published. 

Regulations relating to plumbing and house drainage have 
remained unchanged since 1894, so we felt in view of the fact 
that new building laws were to be brought before the town, it 
was very necessary to revise them. This has been carefully done, 
with the advice and cooperation of our Inspector of Plumbing, 
and we believe now that the town of Andover is strictly up-to- 
date in this respect. 

The School Nurse was installed this year under private aus- 
pices and we firmly believe that it is a duty of the town to see 
that this desirable work is continued in the future. 

We also recommend that the town should in the near future 
consider the feasibility of the installation of a comfort station 
in or near Elm Square. 

At our request the Board of Public Works has extended the 
sewage system on Main Street, also on the lower end of School 
Street and Ridge Street, thus abating many nuisances which 
have been constantly complained of for several years. 

73 



Several complaints having been received in regard to the 
carelessness of persons collecting garbage and ashes, it was 
deemed expedient to license the collectors, whereby we could 
more easily prevent the dropping of garbage on streets and side- 
walks as well as the untidiness caused by waste paper blowing 
about; the yearly fee was fixed at fifty cents. 

The appointments of the Board were as follows : — 

Mr. George A. Higgins, clerk to act in the matter of regis- 
tration of births and deaths. 

Charles H. Newton, nominated Inspector of Slaughtering and 
appointed by the State Department of Health. 

Percy J. Look, M.D., was appointed agent with full power to 
act in the absence of two or more members from town. This was 
done with special reference to the epidemic of Infantile Paralysis 
during the summer vacation season. 

H. H. Nevers, M.D., was appointed Bacteriologist for the 
examination of Diphtheria cultures, for diagnosis only. 

Miss Emily Sprague was appointed as a special agent, of the 
Board of Health. 

On account of the small number of contagious diseases and the 
discharge of tuberculosis patients from the various State insti- 
tutions, we have a balance this year of $769.98. 

. The expenditures of the year are as follows : — 

Appropriation, March 6, 1916 $2000 00 

Chas. H. Newton, Inspector of Cattle $ 250 00 

Chas. H. Newton, Inspector of Slaughtering 102 00 

Joseph P. Nolan, Inspector of Plumbing 98 00 
William Knipe, Assistant Inspector of 

Plumbing 28 00 

Andover Press, advertising and printing 14 10 
Dr. J. F. Winchester, inspection of diseased 

cow 5 00 
Dr. Charles E. Abbott, Secretary Board 

of Health 75 00 

Franklin H. Stacey, salary 50 00 



Amount carried forward $622 10 

74 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916. 

Amount brought forward 

Bancroft T. Haynes, salary 

John H. McDonald, postmaster 

Franklin H. Stacey, Inspector of Milk 

Telephone 

Transportation 

Burying dead animals 

Andover Press, Plumbing Rules 

Andover Press, Board of Health Rules 

Massachusetts Assn. Boards of Health 

Miscellaneous supplies 



Total 845 38 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 

Quarantine 

Sealing plaster 

Dr. Charles E. Abbott, fumigation 

Dr. Percy J. Look, fumigation 

Franklin H. Stacey, fumigators and disin- 
fectants 

Express 

Telephone 

Dr. H. H. Nevers, diphtheria cultures 

Transportation 

Miss Abbott, transportation 

Rutland Tuberculosis Hospital 

Transportation of Patient to Tuberculosis 
Hospital 

Lawrence Tuberculosis Hospital 

Andover Press, printing 

Dr. Percy J. Look, services 



Amount carried forward 383 39 

75 





S2000 00 


622 10 




30 




75 00 




1 25 




4 37 




2 10 




31 50 




54 00 




2 50 




2 26 





32 


00 




65 


58 


00 


4 


00 


20 


50 




26 


3 


37 


27 


00 


1 


35 


1 


50 


146 


86 


2 


00 


77 


15 


3 


75 


5 


00 



Appropriation, March 6, 1916. 
\ Amount brought forward 

Frank Carse, police duty 

Total 

Total general expense 

Balance 





$2000 00 


$383 39 




1 25 




S 384 64 




845 38 




769 98 





$2000 00 $2000 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANKLIN H. STACEY, Ph.C. 
CHAS. E. ABBOTT, M.D. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 



76 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF 

To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen : — I submit to you the report of the Fire Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1916. 

The Department consists of three Engineers, five permanent 
men, twenty-six callmen, and apparatus as follows: one Auto 
Combination Chemical and Hose; one Auto Combination 
Chemical, Pump and Hose; one Fourth Class Steam Fire Engine; 
one horse-drawn Ladder Truck; one horse-drawn Hose Wagon; 
one Pung; one Supply Wagon; and five Horses. 

During the past year we have responded to 42 bell alarms, 
five still alarms and one out-of-town call to North Reading. 

Combination No. 1 has traveled 109.8 miles, and Combination 
No. 2 has traveled 63.6 miles. 

We have laid 13,250 feet of hose, used 854 gallons chemicals, 
and raised 1,071 feet of ladders. 

Value of buildings and contents where fires occurred S 146800 00 

Insurance on buildings and contents where fires 

occurred 10848 00 

Loss on buildings and contents where fires occurred 16190 79 

We have replaced the Fire Alarm box on Maple Avenue which 
was destroyed last year, also installed a new box (No. 31) on the 
Reading Road beyond Gould Road. 

The Ballardvale Engine House has been repaired and painted 
and is now in good condition. 

77 



The Alarm System has been kept in good condition, repairs 
having been made as soon as needed by the Permanent Man 
having charge of that work. 

Wires have been rehung on part of Bartlet Street, Chapel 
Avenue, Main and Salem Street. We have made numerous 
changes owing to the renewal of poles. The battery elements 
will have to be renewed this year as they have outlived their 
usefulness ; we will also need some new tires this year. 

I would recommend $8,700 for maintenance, necessary 
repairs and additions and S500 for new hose. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES S. BUCHAN 

Chief Engineer 



78 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



CHIEF'S REPORT 

To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: I hereby submit the report of the Police 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1916. 

Whole number of arrests, — Males 137 Females 11 148 

Offences for which arrests were made 

Gaming implements in place of business 3 

Assault with dangerous weapon 2 

Having dangerous weapon in possession 2 

Drunks 24 

Common drunkard 6 

Insane 9 

Peddling without license 5 

Disturbance in street car 2 

Cruelty to animals 5 

Violation of town ordinance 14 

Larceny 15 

Violation of automobile law 13 

Interfering with an officer 1 

Robbery 1 

Breaking and entering 2 

Assault 13 

Vagrant 3 

Disturbance of the peace 5 

No lights on horse-drawn vehicles 5 

Stubborn child 2 

Trespass 1 

Non-support 2 

Disorderly house 2 

Breaking mailbox 1 

Storing dynamite without license 1 

Held for out-of-town officers 7 

79 



DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Appealed 4 

Continued 20 

Committed to State Farm 6 

Committed to insane asylum 9 

Committed to House of Correction 7 

Discharged 28 

Held for Grand Jury 7 

Held for out-of-town officers 7 

Paid fines 44 

On probation 11 

On file 5 



Total 148 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Fines paid in lower court $311 00 

Fines paid in Superior Court 5 00 

Burglaries reported 5 

Dead bodies cared for 5 

Doors found opened and secured 42 

Dogs killed 35 

Value of property stolen S3500 00 

Value of property recovered 3000 00 

Value of police equipment 350 00 

SUPERIOR COURT FINDINGS 

One year and three months sentence 1 

Two and one-half years sentence 1 

On probation 2 

No bill found 2 

Paid fine in Superior Court 1 

Respectfully submitted 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Chief of Police 

80 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 



During the past year some seventy-five maple trees have 
been planted by this department in the various parts of the 
town, and several trees in the residential section of the town 
have been trimmed and a few large trees have been removed for 
the betterment of the town. I am pleased to note that the 
Ballardvale Village Improvement Society have taken an active 
part in the development of their section of the town and have 
had planted some thirty-five trees on the streets at their expense 
which will add greatly to the beauty of that section of the town 
in the future and I would ask that the sum of S500 be appro- 
priated for this department. 

J. H. PLAYDOX 

Tree Warden 



81 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



As the past spring was a very unsatisfactory one for our 
department owing to the extremely wet season at the spraying 
time, we were unable to obtain as good results as anticipated, 
with the result that there is a marked increase in Gypsy moth 
nests in the residential part of the town which has made the cost 
of winter work increase. However, with the almost extinction 
of the Browntail mcth and Elm Bettle we have been able to 
live within our appropriation. 

Roadside cutting has been done on several roads in the 
outlying districts of the town which will help greatly to better 
conditions, but owing to the extra cost of labor and material, 
I shall have to ask that the same appropriation of S3 000. 00 be 
appropriated for the department. 

J. H. PLAYDOX 

Local Superintendent 



S2 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



On September 9th, 1916, the whole community was shocked 
to learn of the death of Oliver W. Vennard, Superintendent of 
the Spring Grove Cemetery. While driving from town to the 
cemetery he was thrown from his carriage and instantly killed. 

In the death of Mr. Vennard, your trustees met with an 
irreparable loss. Mr. Vennard took great pride in the develop- 
ment of the cemetery, and its present satisfactory condition is 
due largely to his faithful and efficient services as superintendent, 
extending over a period of twenty-three years. 

The appropriation for the cemetery during the past year has 
been largely expended in preparing a few of the remaining lots, 
in re-facing the main driveways and paving the sides of same on 
the inclines to prevent washouts in the spring. We have also 
broken up a small portion of the unimproved land on the east 
side of the Old Railroad Bed. 

The time has now come when it is absolutely necessary to lay 
out a plot of several acres on the east side of the Old Railroad 
Bed in accordance with plans recently made. For this purpose 
your committee would ask for $2000 in addition to the regular 
appropriation of $1000 and the sale of lots and receipts for work 
done in the cemetery. 

JOHN L. SMITH 
FELIX G. HAYNES 
WALTER I. MORSE 
GEORGE D. MILLETT 
DANIEL H. POOR 
JOHN W. BELL 

Cemetery Trustees 
Andover, December 30, 1916 



83 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 



Lots sold as per last year 444 

Lots sold this year 15 



Total number of lots sold 459 

Total number of single graves sold 166 

Interments as per last report 1216 

Interments this year 60 

Total number of interments 1276 

JOHN \Y. BELL 

For Superintendent 



84 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: I hereby submit my report for the year begin- 
ning November 15, 1915, and ending November 15, 1916. 
Number of cattle inspected 1330 
Number of stables inspected 159 
Number of cows condemned because affected with 

tuberculosis 32 

Interstate cattle identified and released 21 

Number of cases of glanders 1 

Stables disinfected 29 

Respectfully submitted 

CHARLES H. NEWTON 

Inspector of Animals 



85 



CORNELL FUND 



RECEIVED 






Amount of Fund 




$5000 00 


Deposited in Savings Banks 




5000 00 


Balance from last year 


$ 59 47 




Dividends 


200 00 









259 47 


PAID 






Paid for coal and wood 
Balance on hand 


S191 00 
68 47 





259 47 



JOHN C. ANGUS 
ALLAN SIMPSON 
W. D. WALKER 



Trustees 



86 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Town House, fixtures and furniture 
Engine house, storehouse and barn 
25723 ft. land 

Memorial Hall 
22318 ft. land 

Engine house, Ballardvale 
New shed 
1-3 acre land 

Almshouse 

Barn and other buildings 

31 1-2 acres land 

Punchard schoolhouse 
4 acres land 

Heating plant and 
John Dove schoolhouse 
Stowe schoolhouse 
3 3-4 acres of land 

Bradlee schoolhouse, Ballardvale 

1 acre land 

i 

Richardson schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 



Amount carried forward 



$32000 00 




16000 00 




20000 00 






$68000 00 




25000 00 




10000 00 






35000 00 


3000 00 


200 00 




250 00 






3450 00 


12000 00 


1500 00 




5000 00 






18500 00 


28000 00 


8000 00 






36000 00 


42000 00 


24000 00 




6000 00 






72000 00 


14500 00 




500 00 






15000 00 


5000 00 


400 00 






5400 00 




$253350 00 



87 



Amount brought forward 



$253350 00 



Indian Ridge schoolhouse 
1 acre land 

West Centre schoolhou- 
1-2 acre land 

North District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Bailey District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Osgood District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Old schoolhouse, Ballardvale 
1-4 acre land 

9 acres. Indian Ridge (Gravel Pit 

41 1-2 acres. Carmel Woods Reservation 

173.751 sq. ft. land, Central Park. 

Richardson Field) 
6 1-2 acres Play stead 
Bandstand 

Andover Board Public Works — 
Pipelines and fountains 
Pumping-station and buildings 
Coal shed 

3 acres land 

20 acres Boston Ice Co. land 
2 reservoirs 

4 1-2 acres land 
Machinery and tools 
Stone-breaker and engine 
Steam road roller 

Amount carried forward 



S 9600 00 
800 00 



3500 


00 


150 


00 


3500 


00 


50 


00 


1800 


00 


50 


00 


800 


00 


50 


00 


2500 


00 


500 


00 



248000 00 

42500 00 

700 00 

800 00 

2500 00 

16000 00 

2350 00 

1000 00 

2000 00 

1000 00 



10400 00 



3650 00 



3550 00 



1850 00 



850 00 



3000 00 
4000 00 
3600 00 

12000 00 
3000 00 
1000 00 



S3 18850 00 300250 00 



>s 



Amount brought forward 



S3 18850 00 300250 00 



3 sleds 

1 auto 

3 horses 

Carts and harnesses 

Sewer system 

Workshop, Lewis Street 

Barn and shed, Lewis Street 

47467 ft. land, Lewis Street 



Punchard School Fund 

Memorial Hall, Permanent Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Cornell 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Byers 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Edward Taylor 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Isaac E. Gid- 
dings Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, and furniture 

Memorial Hall Library, Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union 

Memorial Hall Library, Phillips Fund 

Personal property at Town Farm 
Motor Combination Chemical Truck 
Motor Combination Pump and Truck 
One Steam Fire Engine and apparatus 
Hook and Ladder Truck 
Two hose wagons 
Hose sled 
Four horses 
Hay scales 

Amount carried forward 



75 


00 






250 


00 






800 


00 






200 


00 






245000 


00 






1000 


00 






3000 


00 






3000 


00 










572175 


00 








872425 


00 






76454 


28 


$45000 00 







7700 00 



10000 00 



500 00 



3000 


00 




10000 


00 




100 


00 




3200 


00 


79500 00 
3981 00 






* 




5300 00 
9000 00 
2800 00 
1000 00 
1000 00 
60 00 
1000 00 
350 00 




$1052870 28 



89 



Amount brought forward 

Safes in Town House 

41 1-2 acres land, Spring Grove Cem'y 

Receiving-tomb and toolhouse 

Weights and measures 
Fire Alarm apparatus 
4000 ft. hose 



$1052870 28 




800 00 


7500 00 




1500 00 






9000 00 
350 00 






4500 00 




2000 00 


$1069520 28 



90 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of A ssessors : 

I herewith hand you my report as Collector of Taxes for the 
year ending December 31, 1916. 

1913 
Amount as per warrant S 915 28 

Additional assessments 7 80 

Moth work 3 50 

Interest 91 28 

Collected taxes S 525 20 

Collected moth work 3 50 

Collected interest 91 28 

Abated 397 88 



S 1017 86 vS 1017 86 



1914 
Amount as per warrant S 9007 49 

Additional assessments 26 36 

Moth work 86 66 

Street Sprinkling 45 73 

Interest 574 91 

Collected taxes S 6265 09 

Collected moth work 86 66 

Collected street sprinkling 45 73 

Collected interest 574 91 

Abated 325 07 

Error, additional assessments. 1915 72 00 

Uncollected 2371 69 



S 9741 15 S 9741 15 



91 



1915 



Amount as per warrant 

Additional assessments 

Moth work 

Street sprinkling 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected moth work 

Collected street sprinkling 

Collected interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 



1916 
Amount as per warrant 
Additional assessments 
Bay State St. R.R. Excise Tax 
Street sprinkling 
Moth work 
Interest 
Collected taxes 
Collected Bay State St. R. R. Excise 

Tax 
Collected street sprinkling 
Collected moth work 
Collected interest 
Abated 
Uncollected 





$ 


27016 15 






531 86 






225 20 






170 46 






518 73 


vS 16698 


09 




225 


20 




170 


46 




518 


73 




472 


18 




10377 


74 




8 28462 


40 S 


28462 40 




$ 


161547 48 

105 89 

2174 30 

1637 04 

1344 90 

68 80 


S137318 


21 




2174 


30 




1637 


04 




1344 


90 




68 


80 




268 


38 




24066 


78 





$166878 41 $166878 41 



SUMMARY COLLECTORS CASH ACCOUNT 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 





Taxes 


Excise 
Tax 


Moth 
Work 


Street 
Sprinkling Interest 


Total 


1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 


£ 525 20 

6265 09 

16698 09 

137318 21 


2174 30 


3 50 

86 66 

225 20 

1344 90 


£ 91 28 

45 73 574 91 

170 46 518 73 

1637 04 68 80 


£ 619 98 

6972 39 

17612 48 

142543 25 




£160806 59 


£2174 30 


£1660 26 


£1853 23 £1253 72 


£167748 10 



JOHN W. BELL 

Collector of Taxes 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Liabilities 

Water Bonds, 4% (10000 due 1917) 
Water Bonds, 3Y 2 % (3000 due 1917) 
Sewer Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1917) 
And'r Loan Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1917) 
High School Loan, 4% (5000 due 1917) 

Assets 

Cash, General Fund 
Cash, Water Department 
Cash, Sewer Department 
Cash, High School Loan 
Cash, Water Bond Premium 
Cash, Sewer Bond Premium 
Cash, Sewer Assessments 

Uncollected Taxes 
Street Sprinkling 
Moth Work 

Commonwealth, State Aid 
Commonwealth, Pauper Account 
Cities and Towns, Pauper Account 
Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 
Sewer Assessments 
Unpaid Water Rates of January 1 
Sinking Funds 

Balance against Town 



$122000 00 




50000 


00 




110000 


00 




20000 


00 




100000 


00 







— $402000 00 


S16755 


27 




5026 


59 




2960 


15 




69907 


63 




50 


78 




151 


16 




6504 


50 




. 


— $101356 08 


S 36816 


21 




388 


67 




545 


32 








37750 20 


S 1141 


74 


125 


80 




405 


47 




206 


00 




11341 


28 




6518 


95 




53570 


33 


73309 57 








s 


189584 15 




402000 00 



93 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Balance, Jan. 1 
Balance, Jan. 1 
Balance, Jan. 1 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 



Dr. 
1916, General Fund 
1916, Water Department 
1916, Sewer Department 
Corporation Tax 
Bank Tax 
St. Railway Tax 
State Aid 
School Tuition 
Industrial School 
Temporary Aid 
Pauper Account 
Mothers' Aid 

Highway Com., Moth work 
Highway Com., Lowell Street 
Soldiers' Exemption Refund 



Commonwealth 

Essex County, Lowell Street 

Essex County, Dog Tax 

Essex County, killing dogs 

Andover Nat'l Bank, Notes 

John W. Bell, Collector, Taxes 

John W. Bell, Interest on Taxes 

John W. Bell, Collector, St. Ry. Excise Tax 

John W. Bell, Collector, Street Sprinkling 

John W. Bell, Collector, Moth Work 

John W. Bell, Collector, Interest on Deposits 

Water Rates 

Water Dept., Service Pipe 

Water Dept., Refund Boston & Maine R. R. 

C. J. Stone, Trial Justice, Fines 

Lawrence House of Correction, Fines 

Almshouse, F. A. Swanton, Supt. 

Spring Grove Cemetery, Sale of Lots 

Town Hall Rents 

School Dept., Tuition and Supplies 

A mount carried forward 



% 21774 


28 


1543 


21 


15410 


33 


18538 


82 


5148 


38 


1420 


46 


1394 


00 


432 


00 


30 


82 


155 


48 


3 


00 


132 


00 


51 


65 


2266 


66 


67 


71 


2295 


04 


596 


44 


35 


00 


80000 


00 


160806 


59 


1253 


72 


2174 


30 


1853 


23 


1660 


26 


140 


72 


23496 


87 


1582 


06 


1 


09 


89 


80 


50 


00 


843 


50 


545 


80 


441 


00 


986 


04 


$347220 26 



94 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 
Orders paid 
Schools 

Highway Department 
North Main Street Sidewalk 
Lowell Street 
Park Department 
Street Lighting 
Police 

Fire Department 
Brush Fires 

Printing and Stationery 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous 
Town House 
Town Officers 
Spring Grove Cemetery 
Board of Health 
Moth Work 
Tree Warden 
Public Dump 
Hay Scales 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 
Memorial Day 

Special G.A.R. Appropriation 
Memorial Hall Library 
Memcrial Hall Library, Dog Tax 
Almshouse Expenses 
Almshouse Repairs 
Relief out of Almshouse 
Soldiers' Relief 
State Aid 
Mothers' Aid 
Retirement of Veterans 
Redemption 11 Water Bonds 

Amount carried forward 



$ 47495 


49 


37938 


47 


4366 


55 


6885 


31 


1481 


76 


6164 


25 


4587 


19 


10697 


45 


371 


71 


1030 


23 


2881 


46 


783 


88 


1901 


69 


6522 


25 


1533 


94 


1230 


02 


4763 


96 


188 


90 


75 


00 


106 


02 


13536 


80 


350 


00 


100 


00 


1800 


00 


596 


44 


5029 


92 


406 


45 


4429 


16 


739 


84 


1141 


74 


804 


00 


300 


00 


11000 


00 


S181239 


58 



95 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Dr. 

Amount brought forward 
Cities and Towns, Pauper Account 
Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 
Hay Scales 

Smart & Flagg, Agents, Insurance Dividends 
Use of Fire Dept. Horses, Various Departments 
Fire Dept., Sale of Chemicals and Supplies 
Highway Dept., Labor and Supplies 
Phillips Academy, Street Lighting 
W. C. Crowley, Sealer's Fees 
Board of Health, Slaughter Licenses 
Board of Health, Garbage Licenses 
Hawkers' and Pedlers' Licenses 

F. H. Stacey, Milk Licenses 

G. A. Higgins, Town Clerk Fees 
Liquor Licenses 

Fireworks Licenses 

Independent Ice Co., Adv. Hearing 

J. H. Playdon, Tree Warden 

J. H. Playdon, Moth Supplies 

Ballardvale Stores, Rent 

Andover Nat'l Bank, Interest on Deposits 

Andover Nat'l Bank, Interest on High School Loan 

Sewer Dept., House Connections 

Sewer Dept., Assessments and Interest 

Sewer Department, Bonds 201-215 

Sewer Dept., Premium on Bonds 

Sewer Dept., Interest on Bonds 

Water Bonds, 341-350 

Water Bonds, Premium 

Water Bonds, Interest 

High School Bonds 

High School Bonds, Premium 

High School Bonds, Interest 

North Main Street, Sidewalk 

Police Dept., Services 

Sewer Dept., Premium for Redemption of Bonds 



Total Receipts 



, Treas., 


in 


$347220 26 


542 


05 


136 


00 


79 


35 


196 


46 


1012 


66 


141 


50 


1695 


37 


230 


00 


55 


22 


4 


00 


16 


50 


78 


00 


11 


50 


100 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


54 


04 


150 


00 


1194 


84 


433 


54 


2399 


70 


9276 


13 


15000 


00 


154 


50 


26 


66 


10000 


00 


103 


00 


17 


78 


100000 


00 


2272 


00 


11 


11 


2883 


80 


63 


00 


494 


33 


$496060 80 



96 



account with the Town of Andover 

Cr. 

Amount brought forward 

Redemption. 5 Andover Loan Act Bonds 

Redemption 5 A. V. Sewer Bonds 

Water Department 

Old Colony Trust Co., Certification Water 

Bonds 
Sewer Department 
Old Colony Trust Co., Certification Sewer 

Bonds 
Sewer Dept., Premium for Redemption of 

Bonds 
Sewer Sinking Funds 
Water Sinking Funds 
W. B. Hodgkins, Treas. Sinking Fund, Sewer 

Assessments 
Sewer House Connections, Refund 
Commonwealth, State Tax 
Commonwealth, Bank Tax 
Commonwealth, State Highway Tax 
County Tax 
New High School 
Andover National Bank Notes 



$181239 


58 


5000 


00 


5000 


00 


20995 


95 


70 


00 


30010 


88 



30 00 

494 S3 

1000 00 

750 00 

2771 63 

121 58 

16560 00 

1503 85 

1973 44 

14374 46 

32809 02 

80000 00 



Total Expenditure 


$394704 72 


Balance on hand, Jan. 1, 1917 




General Fund 


16755 27 


High School Loan 


69907 63 


Water Department 


5026 59 


Sewer Department 


2960 15 


Abbott Village Sewer Assessmets 


6504 50 


Water Bond Premium 


- 50 78 


Sewer Bond Premium 


151 16 



$496060 80 



97 



Richardson Fund — Frye Village School 

Dr. 

Balance, January 1, 1916 S1123 52 

Andover Savings Bank, Interest 45 36 

$1168 88 



Cr. 



Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 


1168 88 


1168 88 






Draper Fund 






Dr. 






Balance, January 1, 1916 


1122 67 




Andover Savings Bank, Deposit 


45 34 


1168 01 






Cr. 






Emily F. Carleton 


1 00 




Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 


1167 01 





1168 01 



Edward Taylor Fund 

Dr. 

Balance, January 1, 1916 229 35 

Andover Savings Bank, Interest 9 24 

238 59 



Cr. 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 238 59 

238 59 

98 



Varnum Lincoln Spelling Match 

Dr. 
Balance, January 1, 1916 
Andover Savings Bank, Interest 

Cr. 
J. F. Allison, Superintendent of Schools 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 



$521 


24 


20 


24 


20 


00 


521 


48 



541 48 



541 48 



Isaac E* Giddings Burial Ground Fund 

Dr. 

Balance, January 1, 1916 1000 00 

Andover Savings Bank, Interest 40 40 

Cr. 

F. L. Brigham, Treas. South Cemetery 40 40 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1000 00 



Cemetery Funds 

Dr. 
Balance, January 1, 1916 
Interest, Andover Savings Bank 
Deposits for Perpetual Care 
Andover National Bank Stock 
Andover National Bank Dividends 

Cr. 
Paid for Care of Lots 
Deposits, Andover Savings Bank 
Andover National Bank Stock 
Cash 



15752 40 

656 46 

1350 00 

200 00 

12 00 



629 00 

17137 86 

200 00 

56 00 



1040 40 



1040 40 



18022 86 



18022 86 



99 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several town officers 
and find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all 
payments. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand: 



General Fund 
High School Fund 



$31448 45 
69907 63 

$101356 08 



NESBIT G. GLEASON 
JOHN S. ROBERTSON 
WALTER H. COLEMAN 

A uditors 



100 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 

COMMITTEE 



The following is a list of appropriations recommended by the 
Finance Committee for 1917. 



Almshouse expenses 


S 4500 00 


Almshouse repairs 


250 00 


Relief out of Almshouse 


4300 00 


Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 


500 00 


Board of Health 


2000 00 


Brush Fires 


800 00 


Fire Department, running expenses and new hose 


9200 00 


Hay Scales 


125 00 


Highway Department, sidewalks, snow 


28000 00 


(Also St. Railway Tax and Street Sprinkling) 




Insurance 


1900 00 


Insurance (Workmen's Compensation) 


1600 00 


Interest 


17000 00 


Memorial Hall Library 


1800 00 


Memorial Day 


350 00 


Post 99, G.A.R. 


100 00 


Miscellaneous 


2000 00 


Parks and Playsteads 


1500 00 


Police 


5000 00 


Printing and Stationery 


1200 00 


Public Dump 


75 00 


Retirement of Veterans, Acts 1912 


300 00 


Redemption of Water Bonds 


12949 22 


Redemption Punchard School Bonds 


2861 89 


Redemption Andover Loan Act Bonds 


5000 00 


Schools 


52500 00 


Sewer Department Maintenance 


2500 00 


Amount carried forward 


S158311 11 



101 



Amount brought forward 


$158311 11 


Sewer Department Sinking Fund 


1000 00 


Soldiers' Relief 


900 00 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


2500 00 


(And receipts from sale of lots) 




State Aid 


1300 00 


Street Lighting 


6500 00 


Town Officers 


6700 00 


Town House 


2000 00 


Tree Warden, Gypsy and Browntail Moth Dept. 


3500 00 


Water Department 




Maintenance 


11000 00 


Construction 


1500 00 


Sinking Fund 


750 00 


Total 


$195961 11 



The Finance Committee is also required to make recom- 
mendations to the voters in regard to all articles in the Town 
Warrant involving the expenditure of money. The committee, 
therefore, makes the following recommendations: — 



Article 4. 


Approved. 


Article 5. 


Recommended that the town appropriate $2500.00 




provided the State and County each appropriate 




a like sum. 


Article 6. 


Approved. 


Article 8. 


Not approved. 


Article 9. 


Not approved. 


Article 10. 


Approved. 


Article 11. 


Not approved. 


Article 12. 


Not approved. 




102 



Article 13. Not approved. 

Article 14. Approved, the appropriation of $200 recommended. 

Article 15. Approved. 

Article 16. Referred to Lighting Committee. 

Article 17. Referred to Lighting Committee. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
GEORGE ABBOT 
HENRY W. BARNARD 
SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL 
CHESTER W. HOLLAND 
JOHN H. CAMPION 
WALTER M. LAMONT 
BARNETT ROGERS 
JOHN C. ANGUS 

Finance Committee 



103 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, SS. : To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the fifth day of March, 1917, at 
6 o'clock A.M., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, one member of the 
Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the Board 
of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for one 
year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Trustee of Memorial Hall 
Library for four years, one Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
two years, one Tree Warden for one year, one Trustee of Cornell 
Fund for three years, one Trustee of Spring Grove Cemetery for 
two years to fill vacancy, Fence Viewers, Pound Keeper, and any 
other officers the town may determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 
Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, 
Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 

104 



Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G.A.R., Miscellaneous, Parks 
and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, 
Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water, Sewer, High 
School, and Andover Loan Act Bonds, Schools, Sewer Mainten- 
ance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove 
Cemetery, State Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town 
House, Tree Warden, Moth Department, Water Maintenance, 
Construction and Sinking Funds, and other town charges and 
expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $10,000 and authorize the High School Building Com- 
mittee to expend the same to build a passageway between the 
old and new Punchard buildings and to make further improve- 
ments on the old Punchard building and to provide additional 
equipment, upon recommendation of the High School Building 
Committee. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money not exceeding $5000.00 to continue the macadam on 
Lowell Street; the same to equal an amount which the State and 
County will severally appropriate, together with the unexpended 
appropriation of 1916, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
S3000 for additions to the filter beds as ordered by the State 
Board of Health, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 7. — To hear and act upon the report of the Committee 
on Building Laws and to pass any by-laws on that subject. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to establish a service for the removal of ashes 
and garbage from dwellings, stores, etc., in the central section of 
the town, partial payment for such service to be secured by a 
reasonable assessment upon owners of property benefited, and 
the balance to be paid by the town, and to appropriate SI 500 
therefor. 

Article 9. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Public Works to construct a gate to close the underground 
drain of the playstead during the winter months in order to form 

105 



a skating-pond and appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars 
for the same, upon petition of W. E. Lombard and others. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000 for the purpose of installing an electric engine in the 
pumping station on Bancroft Road, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum not 
exceeding $4000 for the purpose of building a concrete bridge 
across the Shawsheen River on Central Street, on petition of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will vote to extend the Water 
System from its present terminal on Lowell Street a distance of 
5600 feet to Brown Street, then 3900 feet on Brown Street, on 
petition of Charles W. Livingston and others, and appropriate 
$11,500 for same. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will install water-pipes in 
Chandler Road from the hydrant now located in Chandler Road 
opposite the Kasabian Farm, in a general northwesterly direction 
along Chandler Road to the Railroad bridge, and also to install 
water-pipes from the junction of Beacon Street and Chandler 
Road in a general northeasterly direction to the Keating place 
and to appropriate a sum of money therefor. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will vote to establish a fire 
alarm box on Main Street, at a point between the properties of 
the Tyer Rubber Company and Dionisio Michelini, or there- 
abouts, on petition of Dionisio Michelini and others, and appro- 
priate a sum of money therefor. 

Article 15. — To see if the town will vote to extend the sewer 
on Summer Street from Pine Street to a point 1400 feet distant, 
and appropriate the sum of $3000, the same to be expended under 
the direction of the Board of Public Works and to assess better- 
ments upon the estates benefited by the said extension, on 
petition of the Board of Health. 

Article 16. — To see if the town will vote to place an electric 
light on this side of the residence of David Cunningham on 

106 



Shawsheen Road and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on 
petition of David Cunningham and others. 

Article 17. — To see if the town will vote to place an electric 
light in front of Indian Ridge School on Cuba Street and appro- 
priate a sum of money therefor, on petition of James A. Nolan 
and others. 

Article 18. — To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
vision of Section 37, Chapter 19, of the revised laws, in so far 
as it relates to the regular and permanent Police force of the 
Town of Andover. 

Article 19. — To see if the town will vote to amend its by-laws 
by inserting under Article 4 thereof the following section to be 
numbered 12. 

(12) The selectmen may license suitable persons as junk 
collectors, to collect by purchase or otherwise, junk, 
old metals, and second-hand articles from place to 
place in the town of Andover. Said licenses shall be 
granted on or before the first day of May in each and 
every year. No license as a junk collector shall be 
issued to a person who is not a citizen of the United 
States. Licenses for the collection of junk may be 
issued as aforesaid to persons who do not reside 
within the Town of Andover, but the number of such 
non-resident licenses shall not exceed one to every two 
thousand of the population as ascertained by the next 
preceding official census. The fee for licenses for the 
collection of junk shall be as follows: — 

Resident collectors S 5 . 00 

Non-resident collectors $25 . 00 

Article 20. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year. 

Article 21. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 22. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

107 



Article 23. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 24. — To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

Article 25. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 26. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock A.M.. and may be closed 
at 2 o'clock. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting, as directed by the By-laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February. 
A.D. 1917. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of Andover 



10S 



REPORT OF STREET LIGHTING 
COMMITTEE 

For the Year Ending Decmber 31, 1916 

To the Citizens of the Town of Andover. 

When your committe was authorized at the March Town 
Meeting to enter into a new contract with the Lawrence Gas 
Company, on the expiration of the three-year contract then in 
force, which would expire by limitation on March 31st, and on 
being granted this authority, was especially instructed to use 
its best efforts towards prevailing upon the Gas Company to put 
its wires underground through Andover Square, little did any 
member of the committee, and surely no one of our citizens, 
realize the task which was to be undertaken. 

A meeting was held on March 15th, when the entire situation 
was discussed, and at the invitation of the Committee a repre- 
sentative of the Gas Company was present at the meeting, 
which followed on March 23rd. 

Mr. C. J. R. Humphreys, vice-president and agent of the 
Lawrence Gas Company, was quite willing to extend for a period 
of three years the contract then in effect, without demanding an 
increase in rates, as might have been expected in view of the 
increased costs in production, but absolutely refused to yield to 
the demands of the Committee that all wires owned or controlled 
by the Gas Company between the Memorial Hall and Chestnut 
Street be put underground, and, further, that the poles support- 
ing these wires be removed. The chief objections raised by 
Mr. Humphreys may be summed up as follows: — 

1st. The two most hideous poles, and consequently most 
offensive, the one near the Memorial Hall and the one near 
Mr. Campion's store, were owned by the New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company. 

2nd. The elimination of poles in Andover Square would 
mean the dis-arrangement of the Fire Alarm System, causing 
the town much annoyance and expense. 

109 



3rd. The excessive cost of material, particularly wire, due 
to the very great advance in the price of copper and spelter, made 
the cost of installation prohibitive. This cost was first estimated 
by Mr. Humphreys to be $10,000.00, but after a careful survey 
we were informed that the demands of the Committee could not 
be met without the expenditure of at least $20,000.00. 

Meeting after meeting, together with much correspondence, 
followed, and as the weeks lengthened into months it seemed as 
if the deadlock would never be broken. 

Mr. Humphreys, always courteous and ready to consider any 
proposition, gave much time and thought to our demands. On 
the other hand, the Committee were by no means idle. It was 
pointed out to Mr. Humphreys that property owners using 
electricity had had two voluntary reductions in the price of 
current during the past six years — first from 14 cents to 13 
cents, and recently from 13 cents to 12 cents — or approximately 
14%, whereas the town during this period had received con- 
cessions amounting to less then 1%. In reply Mr. Humphreys 
pointed out that the Gas Company had heretofore met the 
demands of the Committee without question, extending its lines 
in many directions to outlying districts at much expense, and 
had received little in return for this outlay; had greatly improved 
its service and was now giving the town without additional 
expense incandescent lamps of sixty candlepower, in place of 
the twenty-five candlepower lamps, which were considered 
satisfactory some years ago. 

While these statements could not be denied, it was learned on 
good authority that the present sixty candlepower lamp takes 
considerably less energy, and consequently little, if any, more 
expense to maintain that the twenty-five candlepower carbon 
lamp formerly used. 

In the matter of putting the wires underground, however, 
the Committee could get little or no encouragement from any 
source whatever. The officials of the Edison Company, when 
interviewed, stated that practically all underground work had 
been stopped on account of the high cost of material. 

Two members of our committee met by appointment Chairman 
Weed of the Gas and Electric Light Commission, but could get 

110 



no help from this source, as the Commission exercises 
no jurisdiction over uuderground construction, and it was 
suggested that we appeal to the Legislature. An investigation, 
however, satisfied us that this would be fruitless, as we were 
informed that a bill presented earlier in the year for certain 
underground work in the city of Lawrence had been killed in 
the Committee without so much as being debated in the House. 

Finally, the Committee arranged with an expert to investigate, 
and report on the cost of underground construction in the 
section referred to, and while the figures submitted were con- 
siderably lower than those given us by Mr. Humphreys, the 
Committee came to the conclusion that it was an inopportune 
time to demand the elimination of all poles, and the burying of 
all wires in Andover Square which were owned or controlled by 
the Lawrence Gas Company. 

While these negotiations were in progress much had been said 
about better lighting in Andover Square, for when the stores 
are closed the three arc lamps give very little light to the area 
which they are intended to cover, and in consequence complaints 
have been many. 

It was therefore decided that if a contract could ever be 
agreed upon the same should include fifteen or sixteen incan- 
descents of 250 candlepower each, which Mr. Humphreys had 
agreed to furnish at a cost of $43.00 each per year, to be placed 
in the Square at points fixed upon by the Committee. In order 
to bring this within the appropriation Mr. Humphreys volun- 
tarily agreed to reduce the price of incandescents lamps (273) 
from $16.00 to $15.00 per year. 

The Committee then insisted that these high-powered lamps 
be mounted on attractive poles, fitted to receive underground 
wires, with no cross arms, and that all wires leading to and from 
these poles be put underground. This brought about another 
deadlock, which lasted until late in August. The Committee, 
however, felt that the stand taken by them was consistent, and 
that if it was ever necessary to bring the matter before a special 
town meeting they would have the support of the citizens, for 
if it was the desire to put underground the wires now extending 
through the Square, surely the people of Andover would never 

111 



allow fifteen or sixteen additional poles to be erected, with wires 
carrying high-powered current strung along both sides of Main 
Street, and around the Square. 

In justice to Mr. Humphreys it should be said that in his 
desire to meet the views of the Committee he prevailed upon his 
associates to grant these concessions, and at a meeting held on 
August 30th the negotiations were finally concluded. The 
request of Mr. Humphreys that a five-year contract be drawn 
up was granted, and was subsequently signed; the same dating 
from April 1st. 1916. 

According to the plans, the 250-candlepower incandescent 
lamps, sixteen in number, are to replace the three arc lamps in 
the Square and on Main Street between the Square and Chestnut 
Street, and are to be located as follows: — 

To encircle the Square with eight of these lamps; then begin- 
ning with Xo. 9. to place the same at a point near the corner 
(nearest the Square) of building owned by W. A. Allen: Xo. 10 
to be placed diagonally across the street, about half-way between 
Xo. 9 and Xo. 11; the latter being at the corner of Barnard's 
Block: Xo. 12 to be on the opposite side of Main Street, half-way 
between Xo. 11 at the corner of Main and Park Streets, and 
Xo. 13. which is to be on the corner of Main and Barnard Streets. 
This leaves three lamps to be placed farther up Main Street, as 
equally distant one from the other as conditions will permit. 

No. 15 will be about half-way between X"o. 13 and the corner 
of Main and Chestnut Streets, near the entrance to the Arco 
Building; Xo. 14 to be on the opposite side, half-way between 
Xo. 13 and Xo. 15, while Xo. 16 will be on the westerly side of 
Main Street, near the Swift estate, at about the same distance 
from Xo. 14 as this lamp is from Xo. 12. 

Although this means an additional expense to the town, the 
reduction of $1.00 each in the cost of the 60-candlepower incan- 
descents means a saving to the town of $273.00 per year, and 
enables the Committee to meet the additional expense of the 
250-candlepower lamps, without adding materially to the 
amount to be appropriated for 1917. 

112 



The cost according to the present layout will be as follows 

273 incandescents at $15 $4095 

29 arcs at $68 1972 

16 250-candlepower incandescents at $43 688 
7 incandescents ordered but not 

yet installed at $15 105 



$6860 
Less 5 arcs to be removed 340 



$6520 



Unfortunately the permit granted by the Selectmen for the 
erection of the poles on which the 250-candlepower lamps will 
be placed was received too late (December 4th) to permit the 
laying of the underground conduits before the frost set in, 
notwithstanding the fact that at the hearing held on October 24th 
there was no opposition. 

We understand the delay was due to the desire on the part of 
the Gas Company to erect wooden poles, whereas the Board 
felt that the town could rightfully insist on iron poles, or iron 
standards with extensions of wood, to imitate iron, and the 
permit when finally issued so specified. 

While we do not question the position of the Board, which we 
have no doubt was fully justified, it is nevertheless to be regretted 
that the permit could not have been issued earlier, for the 
Committee was making every effort to give the town the benefit 
of these lights during the past winter, when on account of the 
short days and bad weather the same were so much needed. 

Owing to the uncertainty attending the new contract, only 
five incandescents were added in 1916, whereas nineteen new 
lights were installed in 1915. 

It will not do, however, to lose sight of the fact that the town 
is poorly lighted, and that our taxpayers have a right to a certain 
number of extensions each year. 

Furthermore, it is the belief of the Committee that newly 
settled sections which are responsible for an increase in taxes, 
in some cases amounting to several hundred dollars yearly, are 

113 



in return entitled to a light, the cost of which is but $15.00 per 
year. 

Your Committee realizes, however, that there are many 
demands on the town, and in view of the very favorable contract 
entered into with the Lawrence Gas Company we feel that for 
this year, at least, we can meet all pressing needs with the same 
appropriation as last year, viz., $6500.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

BARNETT ROGERS 
COLVER J. STONE 
W. H. COLEMAN 
H. J. GARDNER 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN 

Street Lighting Committee 



JU 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Rev. E. VICTOR BIGELOW MYRON E. GUTTERSON 

Rev. C. W. HENRY HARRY H. NOYES 

Rev. NEWMAN MATTHEWS HARRY M. EAMES 

S. H. BOUTWELL FRANK T. CARLTON 

Trustees 



115 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



1916 PRINCIPAL FUND 






January 1st 








Cash in Bank 


$ 465 


53 




Real Estate, Mortgages and Bonds 


75988 


75 


$76454 28 








December 31st 








Cash in Bank 


$ 4334 97 




Real Estate, Mortgages and Bonds 


72119 


31 


$76454 28 








January 1st 








Cash in Bank 


$ 465 


53 




Mortgages paid during year 


6069 


44 


$ 6534 97 








December 31st 








Investment in new mortgages 


$ 2200 00 




Cash in Bank 


4334 


97 


$ 6534 97 


INCOME 








January 1st 








Cash in Bank 


$ 1689 


93 




Interest on Mortgages and Bonds 


3630 


59 


$ 5320 52 








EXPENDITURES 








N. C. Hamblin 


$ 800 


00 




Edna G. Chapin 


865 


00 




Helen M. Dunn 


850 


00 




Percival M. Symonds 


895 


00 




Insurance 


25 


00 




Andover National Bank — Deposit box 


5 


00 




Harry H. Noyes, Treasurer 


200 


00 




N. C. Hamblin — Travel 


21 


00 




Balance in Bank 


1659 


52 


$ 5320 52 



116 



BARNARD FUND 
January 1st 

Cash in Bank 
Dividends 

Prizes awarded 

First— Ruth Elizabeth Abbott, '16 
Second — Gertrude Wells Berry, '16 
Third — Horace Holbrook Dodge, '17 
Cash in Bank 



$25 


50 


40 


00 


S20 00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


25 


50 



S65 50 



$65 50 



January 1st 

Cash in Bank 
Dividends 

December 31st 
Cash in Bank 



DRAPER FUND 



$1361 58 
S 54 98 



$1416 56 



$1416 56 $1416 56 



GOLDSMITH FUND 
Cash in Bank $252 00 

Dividends 10 18 



Prizes awarded 

Girl's Prize— Vera Leslie, *18 $ 5 00 

Boy's Prize— William Rollins Brewster, '17 5 00 



Cash in Bank 



Examined and found correct. 



252 18 



$262 18 



$262 18 



HARRY H. NOYES 

Treasurer 

HARRY M. EAMES 
FRANK T. CARLTON 

Auditors 



117 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The Trustees of Memorial Hall Library, submit herewith 
to the town, their annual report, and that of the Librarian, for 
the year 1916. 

The Trustees desire to make use of this opportunity to express 
publicly their deep appreciation of the unique and valuable 
service of two members removed during the past year from their 
number, Mr. John Alden and Rev. C. C. Carpenter, the former 
by death, the latter by resignation. The town has been indeed 
fortunate to have had the services of two such intelligent and 
public-spirited men. They have proved themselves through 
long periods of service wise counselors, unselfish administrators 
of an important public trust, and model citizens. 

The influence of a well managed and efficient library on 
the ideals and civic life of such a town as Andover cannot easily 
be measured. Too frequently it is carelessly ignored. That such 
an influence is deep and far-reaching is, however, clearly recog- 
nized by every thoughtful citizen. 

In order that the library may continue to render its proper 
service to the community it serves and may meet satisfactorily 
the increasing demands of a growing town, it must not be pre- 
vented from attaining a normal growth and development. 
Facilities that may have been adequate twenty years ago will 
not meet the needs of the present day; and yet with the passing 
years the limited accommodations available for library uses in 
Memorial Hall have undergone little if any change. Shelves for 
the accommodation of even such books as are in constant de- 
mand are wholly inadequate. Reading-room facilities are in- 

118 



creasingly cramped and from their nature incapable of supplying 
that atmosphere of quiet and relaxation so essential to the 
free and stimulating use of such opportunities as the library 
should naturally afford. We believe that the town owes it to 
its present and its future citizens to give most earnest and careful 
consideration to the urgent needs of its library and to provide in 
the immediate future for the enlargement of the present building. 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
GEORGE F. SMITH 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
BURTON S. FLAGG 
WILLIAM H. RYDER 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 

Trustees 



119 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
In account with the Town of ANDOVER, MASS. 



RECEIPTS 



Balance from last year 

Town appropriation 

Dog tax 

Income from investments 

Fines 

Cash for lost books 

Gifts 

Sale of old furnace 

Middleton bequest 

Total 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 

Lighting and heating 

Periodicals 

Bookbinding 

Books 

Invested 

Sundry items 

Cash on hand 

Total 



S3,412 


59 


1,800 


00 


596 


44 


3,230 


00 


151 


35 


6 


78 


5 


00 


10 


00 


200 


00 


S9,412 


16 



S3,415 


05 


514 


83 


174 


90 


267 


13 


876 


02 


1,000 00 


713 


15 


2,451 


08 


S9,412 


16 



120 



Statement of Income and Expenses of the Trustees of Memorial 
Hall Library for the Year of 1916 





INCOME 








Maint. 


Books 


Cornell 


Total 


Income from investments 


#2106 12 


#703 48 


#420 40 


#3230 00 


Town appropriation 


1800 00 






1800 00 


Dog tax 


596 44 






596 44 


Lost books repaid 




6.78 




6.78 


Fines 


151.35 






151.35 


Sale of furnace 


10 00 






10 00 


Gifts 




5 00 




5 00 


Middleton bequest 




200 00 




200 00 


Total 


#4663 91 


#915 26 


#420 40 


#5999 57 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 


#3296 75 




#118 30 


#3415 05 


Lighting and heating 


403 66 




111 17 


514 83 


Periodicals 


174 90 






174 90 


Bookbinding 


267 13 






267 13 


Books 




876 02 




876 02 


Sundry items 


712 45 




70 


713 15 


Total 


#4854 89 


#876 02 


#230 17 


#5961 08 


L'nexpended income 


#*190 98 


#39 24 


#190 23 


#38 49 


*Deficit for one year 











Condition of Funds and Unexpended Income on hand Jan., 1917 



Maintenance fund 
Book funds (general) 
Book funds (special) 
Cornell fund (permanent) 
Cornell fund (purchase) 
Special 



Funds 


Unex. Inc. 


#46600 00 


#1017 92 


13600 00 


529 92 


3200 00 


153 22 


5000 00 


293 58 


3700 00 


250 35 




64 94 


#72100 00 


#2309 93 



121 



INVESTMENTS 



Bangor & Aroostook R. R. 4s 
Boston Elevated Ry. Co. 4^s 
Boston Elevated Ry. Co. 4s 
Chicago Railways Co., 5s 
Montreal Tramways Co., 5s 
Michigan State Tel. Co., 5s 
Boston & Maine R. R., 4s 
Boston & Albany Equip. Trust, 4j^s 
Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 
Mortgage on real estate, 5% 
Savings Banks 

Am. Tel. & Tel. Co., 4 shares 
Principal cash 

Total 

Income cash on hand 

Principal cash on hand 



$11000 00 


1000 


00 


10000 


00 


9962 


50 


9962 


50 


4981 


25 


2000 


00 


29S1 


10 


1000 


00 


4000 


00 


14500 


00 


571. 


50 


141. 


15 


$72100 00 


$ 2309 93 


141 


15 



Total 



$ 2451 08 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL, Treasurer 



I certify that I have examined and found correct the 
above statements as of January 15, 1917, whereby all securities 
held against the several funds have been examined and the income 
accruing from same accounted for. 

All disbursements are supported by receipts in proper form 
and the cash on deposit as shown has been verified and found 
correct. 

BURTON S. FLAGG 



A uditor 



Jan. 26, 1917 



122 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library . 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the library 
for the twelve months ending December 31, 1916. 

The circulation for the year is 40,377 volumes as opposed to 
41,627 for 1915. The difference is due to a drop at Ballardvale 
and to the fact that the school libraries, usually in commission 
at the beginning of the term have not been used this fall. The 
actual difference in circulation at the Memorial Hall Library 
itself is but 101 less books than for 1915. 

The reference use of the library continues large. During the 
autumn various purchases were made in order to provide the 
books wanted for the winter's study by different clubs in town. 
There was unusual interest in modern drama, and the library 
obtained a quantity of popular and valuable material, not only 
for the clubs, but for the many interested in the White Fund 
lectures to be given in Lawrence upon Maeterlinck. 

The High school use is especially satisfactory. During the 
coming year it is planned to carry out a system of instructing 
the students in the use of the library, especially in the use of 
reference books. Too many boys and girls reach the High school 
with but the crudest ideas of the difference between a dictionary 
and an encyclopedia. This instruction will be counted as school 
work and each division will come to the library in charge of a 
teacher. Our very limited quarters will make this difficult both 
for the students and the general public, but the inconvenience 
will have to be endured by both until we have the proper facili- 
ties for such enterprises. 

The use of the library by the grade schools has been much 
less than usual this fall, probably due to changes in methods. 
The children use the reading-room just as much for recreation 
but come less for help in school work. 

123 



The year just past has brought us a number of appreciated 
gifts. From the estate of Mrs. Middleton we received the sum 
of two hundred dollars in memory of her husband. David Middle- 
ton, one of the original trustees of the library. It was decided 
to expend this bequest in the purchase of reference books and Rev. 
James H. Ropes personally provided a book-plate to mark these 
books. The new edition of the New International Encyclo- 
pedia was the first purchase from this fund. 

Another valuable gift was the Catholic Encyclopedia, pre- 
sented by the local chapter of the Knights of Columbus. This is 
an extremely scholarly work and one of great value to students 
and research workers. To add to our shelves in one year both 
these encyclopedias is a matter or congratulation for the town. 

The Andover Milage Improvement Society set out in the 
early summer three young maples along the top of the terrace on 
\orth Main Street. When grown, these will be a great addition to 
the grounds and will not interfere in the least with an extension of 
the building in that direction, care having been taken to plant 
them where they will never have to be disturbed. 

There have been other appreciated gifts of books. Mrs. 
Andrew Lawrie gave to the reading-room an interesting head of 
Dante: Rev. F. A. Wilson contributed several potted plants and 
we have had our usual tribute of flowers as early and as long as 
any appeared in the gardens of Andover. 

At Ballardvale. the Ballardvale Improvement Society, with 
the co-operation of the Trustees, graded, seeded and greatly 
improved by the construction of neat walks, the grounds about 
the building where the branch library has its room. The locality 
is transformed and when shrubs are planted another year, the 
Vale may well feel proud in possessing so attractive a setting for 
its pleasant little library. 

The library room itself has been much improved by the 
erection of shelving along its north side, the only wall unbroken 
by windows. This provides space for all the books that the branch 
is ever likely to need, and greatly adds to the looks of the library. 
The use of the branch, while less than at the start, is yet large and 
proves conclusively the appreciation of the village. 

Librarians all over the country were asked to unite with the 
Boy Scouts in celebrating the week of December 4 to 9, as " Good 

124 



Book Week," calling attention to good literature, especially 
good books for children. The exhibit of attractive volumes at the 
Memorial Hall Library attracted a great deal of attention both 
from the young people and from their parents. In addition to 
books meant especially for boys, there were others for children of 
all ages, varying in price from twenty cents to three dollars. 
It is never necessary to buy for a child a book just off the press, 
for the old favorites remain and are often much more wholesome 
than a recently issued story. It is planned to make this Christ- 
mas exhibit an annual feature. 

The high cost of paper has had one good effect, of crowding 
from the market some of the cheap literature, cheap in every 
sense. Instead of a flood of ill-written, sensational stories, we 
have a smaller issue, but better worth-while. There has been not 
only a distinct improvement in the type of fiction printed, but an 
increased number of good books on history, travel and political 
economy. The library has taken the opportunity to replace on 
its shelves worn copies of books possessing lasting value and of 
duplicating others always in demand. The coming year should 
see more of this replacement, especially with the children's 
books. The great care taken by the library in its choice of books 
is pleasantly reflected in frequent letters from other libraries of 
the same size, asking advice about purchasing new books and 
expressing appreciation of our unusually discriminating selection 
of literature. 

Trustees and librarian alike have suffered a great loss in the 
death of Mr. John Alden, for the past ten years one of the most 
valued members of the Board. Though a busy man, with many 
important interests upon his mind, he invariably gave his careful 
attention to the duties of Chairman of the Book Committee, and 
in spite of great business responsibilities, had always time to 
consider library problems not only as a trustee, but as a friend. 

We also regret the resignation of Rev. Charles C. Carpenter, 
for twenty-five years a member of the Board. To his unfailing 
interest the library owes much, including many books of perma- 
nent value added to its shelves, and especially its really fine col- 
lection of religious publications, the purchase of which was made 
possible by the existence of the Phillips Charitable Donation 

125 



Fund, which under the will of the Rev. Samuel Phillips, may be 
expended only for ethical and religious publications. 

There is an old proverb that "patient waiters are no losers." 
For years the library has waited for relief to its cramped quarters, 
and for a chance to do more for the town. There is also a saying 
to the effect that there comes a time when patience ceases to be a 
virtue. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDNA A. BROWN, 

Librarian 



126 



STATISTICS OF THE LIBRARY 

Jan. 1, 1916,-Dec. 31, 1916 

Number of books issued for home use at Memorial Hall, 33702 

Number issued at Ballardvale, 6675 

Total, 40377 

Percentage of fiction circulated, 70 

Percentage of non-fiction circulated, 30 

New borrowers registered, 1916, 296 

Actual number of cards in use, 2494 

Books added by purchase, 732 

Books added by gift, 82 

Total accessions, 814 

Books withdrawn, worn out, etc. 64 

Total number of books in library, 23253 

Volumes rebound 428 

Volumes bound, periodicals, etc. 78 

BALLARDVALE 

Number of books issued for home use 6675 

Percentage of fiction, 83 

Percentage of non-fiction, 17 

Number of cards in use, 342 

Books added during 1916 161 

Books now belonging to branch, 1172 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

Gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from state and 
government departments, from other libraries, from societies, 
the Andover Village Improvement Society, the Knights of Colum- 
bus, and from the following individuals: 

Mrs J. N. Ashton; H. H. Atherton; C. K. Bancroft; L. J. 
Buck; A. B. Carey; Sir Gilbert Parker; W. M. Polk; Mrs. George 
Ripley; G. B. Ripley; Mrs. Barnett Rogers; G. S. Streeter and 
Rev. F.A.Wilson. 

127 



LIST OF PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS TAKEN FOR THE 

READING ROOM 

American monthly review of reviews 

Atlantic monthly 

Blackwood's magazine 

Bookman 

Book review digest 

Catholic world 

Century 

Country gentleman 

Christian Endeavor world (gift) 

Country life in America 

Cumulative book index 

Education 

Elementary school journal 

Etude 

Forum 

Garden magazine (gift) 

Guide to nature (gift) 

Harper's magazine 

House beautiful (gift) 

Independent 

International studio (gift) 

Ladies' home journal 

Library journal 

Life 

Literary digest 

Littell's living age 

London weekly Times 

Missionary review of the world 

Nation 

National geographic magazine 

Nineteenth century 

North American review 

Outing 

Outlook 

Popular mechanics 

Practical engineer 

128 



Public libraries 

Punch (gift) 

Readers' guide to periodical literature 

St. Nicholas 

School arts magazine 

Scientific American 

Scribner's magazine 

Something to do 

Survey 

Woman's Home Companion 

World's work 

Youth's companion 

Andover Townsman 

Boston Advertiser 

Boston Herald 

Boston Transcript 

Christian Science Monitor (gift) 

Lawrence Telegram 

New York Times 



129 



INFORMATION FOR USERS OF THE LIBRARY 

The Memorial Hall Library is open every day except Sundays 
and legal holidays from 9 to 12.30 in the morning, and from 3 to 
9 in the afternoon and evening. 

Any resident of Andover over ten years of age may have a 
library card upon filling out an application blank. Children in 
grades below the Punchard School are required to have their 
applications endorsed by both parent and teacher. 

All grown people are allowed to take any reasonable number 
of books, provided that only one is a seven-day book. The 
Punchard pupils are permitted to borrow two, one fiction and 
one non-fiction. 

Books are issued for fourteen days, the date upon which the 
book is due being stamped plainly on the "date due" slip at the 
time of issue. A book kept overtime incurs a fine of two cents 
for every day overdue. A few of the books most in demand are 
issued for seven days only. All these are labeled upon the book 
pocket, "Seven day book". Books lost or damaged must be 
paid for. 

Seven day books are not renewed or reserved for anyone. 
Other books may be renewed if no one else has asked for them, 
and if a work not fiction, is specially desired for any serious 
purpose, notice of its return to the library will be sent on request. 

The shelves of the whole library are open to all grown people. 
The books are arranged according to subjects, and it is often 
much more satisfactory to go to the shelves and examine the 
books than to depend upon the catalogue. 

The only complete index of the contents of the library is the 
card catalogue. The printed catalogue of the books was issued 
ten years ago, and is out-of-date, besides containing the names 
of many books which are no longer in the library. The new books 
are listed at intervals in the weekly paper, and cumulated in the 
yearly library report, but the only complete record is the card 
catalogue. This catalogue is arranged alphabetically like a 
dictionary. To find whether any given book is in the library, 
look for it under the surname of the author, or under its title. 
The right-hand drawers of the case contain a second arrange- 

130 



ment of cards where the books are entered according to the 
subjects of which they treat. 

The new books purchased each month are placed for some 
weeks in a special case on the north side of the reading room, 
so that the most recent additions to the library may be found 
there. The library buys only a limited amount of new fiction, 
but it tries to fill the wants of the community in regard to other 
books desired. People are invited to suggest for purchase the 
titles of books they wish. 

The library staff is always glad to answer questions or in any 
way to help visitors find what they want. 



131 



NEW BOOKS ADDED DURING 1916 



State and government documents and annual reports received regularly are not 
listed. Duplicates purchased for replacement or for Ballardvale are also 
omitted. 

GENERAL REFERENCE BOOKS 

305A511 *American yearbook, 1915 

203 C28 *Catholic encyclopedia. 16 v. 

803 M86 Moulton, C. W. ed. Library of literary criticism. 8 v. 

031 N42 New international encyclopedia. 24 v. 

PERIODICALS 

051 R32 American monthly review of reviews, v. 53. 

051 A881 Atlantic monthly, v. 117. 

052 B56 Blackwood's Edinburgh magazine, v. 199. 
051 B64 Bookman, v. 42, 43. 

051 C33 Century, v. 91. 

705 C84 Craftsman, v. 28. 

370.5 E25 Education, v. 35. 

370.5 E39 Elementary school teacher, v. 16. 

051 F77 Forum, v. 55. 

716 G16 Garden magazine, v. 23. 

051 H23 Harper's magazine, v. 131, 132. 

705 H81 House beautiful, v. 39. 

051 138 Independent, v. 85, 86. 

705 161 international studio, v. 58. 

051 L71 Littell's living age, v. 288, 289. 
071 N21 Nation, v. 102. 

910.5 N21 National geographic magazine, v. 28, 29. 

052 N62 Nineteenth century, v. 79. 

051 N81 North American review, v. 203. 

799.5 094 Outing, v. 67. 

051 094 Outlook, v. 112, 113. 

621 P81 Popular mechanics, v. 25. 

051 S147 St. Nicholas, v. 42, 43, pt. 1. 

370.5 S35 School arts magazine, v. 15. 

605 S416 Scientific American, v. 114. 

051 S434 Scribner's magazine, v. 59. 

305 S96 Survey, v. 34, 35. 

051 W89 World's work, v. 30, 31. 

ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS BOOKS 

(Purchased chiefly from the Phillips Fund) 

269 A37 Alexander, J. L. ed. Sunday school and the teens. 

172.4 A23 Adler, Felix. World crisis and its meaning. 

268 A86 *Athearn, W. S. The church school. 



* 



Gifts 



132 



261 A87 


225 B14 


244 B15 


173 B46 


204 B56 


268 D22b 


226 D85 


177 E26 


237 F78 


248 F78m 


248 F78p 


248 F78s 


252 G45c 


204 G65a 


173 G92s 


131 H14 


220 H91 


252 J13 


226 K41a 


220.9 K41t 


177 K75 


268 L43s 


268 M13 


174 M 17 


268 M19 


266 M19 


174 M33v 


266 M85s 


268 P32 


170 P97 


367 R39 


220.9 R44 


221 S65 


150 S66 


232 S87 


281 T33 


131 W17p 


268 W46 



Atkinson, H. A. Church and the people's play. 

Bade, W. F. Old Testament in the light of to-day. 

*Bailey, A. E. On Nazareth hill. 

Betts, G. H. Fathers and mothers. 

Black, Hugh. The new world. 

Danielson, F. W. Lessons for teachers of beginners. 

DuBose, W. P. Gospel in the gospels. 

Edwards, Agnes. House of friendship. 

*Fosdick, H. E. Assurance of immortality. 

*Fosdick, H. E. Manhood of the Master. 

*Fosdick, H. E. Meaning of prayer. 

*Fosdick, H. E. The second mile. 

Gladden, Washington. Commencement days. 

Gordon, G. A. Aspects of the infinite mystery. 

Gruenberg, S. M. Sons and daughters. 

Hall, H. J. The untroubled mind. 

Hunting, H. B.^ Story of our Bible. 

Jackson, F. J. F. Faith and the war. 

Kent, C. F. Work and teachings of the apostles. 

Kent & Jenks. Testing of a nation's ideals. 

Knott, L. A. Vesper talks to girls. 

Lawrance, Marion. Special days in the Sunday school. 

McCormick, William. Fishers of boys. 

MacGregor, T. D. Book of thrift. 

McKeever, W. A. How to become an efficient Sunday 

school teacher. 

Mackenzie, J. K. Black sheep. 

Marden, O. S. Victorious attitude. 

Mott, J. R. Strategic points in the world's conquest. 

Peabody, E. C. Lives worth living. 

Purinton, E. E. Efficient living. 

Richardson & Loomis. Boy scout movement applied by 

the church. 

Rihbany, A. M. The Syrian Christ. 

Smith, N. A. Old old tales from the old old book. 

Smyth, Newman. Meaning of personal life. 

Stokes, A. P. What Jesus Christ thought of himself. 

Thatcher, O. J. Sketch of the history of the apostolic 

church. 

Walton, G. L. Peg along. 

*Wells, A. R. Successful Sunday school superintendent. 



GENERAL ECONOMICS 



658 A43 
355 A56 



Allen, F. J. Business employments. 

Andrews, L. C. Fundamentals of military service. 



133 



396 B45 *Bernbaum, Ernest, ed. Anti-suffrage essays by Massa- 

chusetts women. 

361 B63 Boardman, M. T. Under the Red Cross flag at home and 

abroad. 

336 D51 Dewey, D. R. Financial history of the United States. 

365 D74 Doty, M. Z. Society's misfits. 

365 F45 Field, A. P. L. Story of Canada Blackie. 

341.7 F52 Fish, C. R. American diplomacy. 

347 F82 Fowler, N. C. How to obtain citizenship. 

327 H25m Hart, A. B. The Monroe doctrine. 

353 H55c Hill & Davis. Civics for new Americans. 

658 K21 Kearney, L. C. What every business woman should 

know. 
321 M14 MacDonald, J. A. Democracy and the nations. 

327 R67f Roosevelt, Theodore. Fear God and take your own part. 

658 S63 Smart, W. K. How to write business letters. 

331.8 W14 Wald, L. D. House on Henry Street. 

BOOKS ON EDUCATION 

(Purchased from the Phillips Fund for Books for Teachers) 

371 C94 Curtis, H. S. Education through play. 

371 D51 Dewey, J. & E. Schools of to-morrow. 

510 D72 Dooley, W. H. Vocational mathematics. 

028 F29 Fay & Eaton. Instruction in the use of books and 

libraries. 

425 H14 Hall, F. H. A B C of correct speech 

373.42 H32 Hay, Ian, pseud. Lighter side of school life. 

370 H38e Henderson, C. H. Education and the larger life. 

379 H58 *Hinchman, W. S. American school. 

028.5 H91 Hunt, C. W. What shall we read to the children? 

373 J64m Johnston, C. H. Modern high school. 

373 J88 Judd, C. H. Psychology of high school subjects. 

371.4 L48p Leavitt & Brown. Prevocational education in the public 

schools. 
373 L64s Lindsay, Maud. Story-teller. 

370 M78 Moore, E. C. What is education? 

514 051 *01ney, Edward. Elements of trigonometry. 

803.5 P16 Painton, E. F. A. U. The commencement manual. 

371 S63 Sleight, W. G. Educational values and methods. 

808.9 S67 Snow, W. L. ed. High school prize speaker. 

NATURE BOOKS 

588.2 D92 Dunham, E. M. How to know the mosses. 

595.7 Fllh Fabre, J. H. C. The hunting wasps. 

580 K24 Keeler, H. L. Our early wild flowers. 

134 



551.5 L86 
581.5 M26 



Longstreth, T. M. Reading the weather. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice. Intelligence of the flowers. 



617.6 B72 
614.8 E42 
613 F53 
613 S95 



BOOKS ON HYGIENE 

Brackett, C. A. Care of the teeth. 
Eliason, E. L. First aid in emergencies. 
Fisher & Fisk. How to live. 
Summerville, Amelia. Why be fat? 



BOOKS FOR THE HOME AND FARM 

728 A79 Arthur, William. Home builders' guide. 

649 C73 Comstock, Sarah. Mothercraft. 

636.8 F74 *Forbush, E. H. The domestic cat. 

645 F81 Foster, Agnes. Making curtains and hangings. 

746 K68mk Klickmann, Flora, ed. Modern knitting book. 

641 N36 Nesbitt, Florence. Low-cost cooking. 

638 P54 Phillips, E. F. Bee keeping. 

640 R393 Richardson, A. S. Adventures in thrift. 

716 S54 Shelton, Louise. Continuous bloom in America. 

728 W15 Wallick, Ekin. Small house for a moderate income. 

635 W34 Watts, R. L. Vegetable garden. 

641 W67d Williams, Florence. Dainties for home parties. 
728 W93 Wright, Richardson. Suburban homes. 

BOOKS ON GAMES AND AMUSEMENTS 

797 B22 Bancroft & Pulvermacher. Handbook of athletic games. 

796 B55 Bjurstedt, Molla. Tennis for women. 

793 C24 Carter, E. H. Christmas candles, plays. 

793 M19c Mackay, C. D. Costumes and scenery for amateurs. 

793 043 Olcott, Virginia. Plays for home, school and settlement. 

793 065 Ordway, E. B. Handbook of conumdrums. 

793 T21 Taylor, Emerson. Practical stage directing for amateurs. 



BOOKS ON MECHANICAL AND FINE ARTS 

745 A8 1 Ashley, G. P. Raffia basketry as a fine art. 

759.5 B81 Brown & Rankin. Short history of Italian painting. 

759.6 D56 Dieulafoy, Marcel. Art in Spain and Portugal. 
778 D41 Dench, E. A. Making the movies. 

608 E22 Edelman, P. F. Inventions and patents. 

694 G87 Griffith, I. S. Woodwork for secondary schools. 

745 H32 Hayden, Arthur. Chats on old silver. 

786 H67p Hofmann, Josef. Piano playing. 

135 



604 H95 
744 L51 
694 N87h 
782 065 
533.6 T14 
629.1 V61 
709 W58 



Husband, Joseph. America at work. 

Leeds, C. C. Mechanical drawing. 

Noyes, William. Handwork in wood. 

Ordway, E. B. The opera book. 

Talbot, F. A. Aeroplanes and dirigibles of war. 

Yerrill, A. H. A B C of automobile driving. 

Whitcomb, I. P. Young people's story of art. 



LITERATURE, ESSAYS AND POETRY 



809.2 A67 
822.33 B39 
821 B79 
824 B94u 
809.2 Cll 
820.8 C77p 

820.8 C77pr 

822.33 D98 
822.33 H24 
822.33 H33 

830.9 H36 
821 J63w 
655 K13 
827 L46m 
822.33 L51 
842 M26a 
844 M26b 
842 M26i 
842 M26j 
842 M26m 
133 M26o 
842 M26p 
842 M26pm 
133 M26u 
844 M26w 
821 M37g 
822.33 M37 
822.33 M43 
807 M86 
821 M871 
821 P18 
810.9 P27 
824 P42f 
823 P51a 



Archer, William. Play-making. 

Beeching, H. C. Sonnets of Shakespeare. 

Brooke, Rupert. Collected poems. 

Burroughs, John. Under the apple trees. 

Caffin, C. H. Appreciation of the drama. 

Cook & Tinker, ed. Select translations from old English 

poetry. 

Cook & Tinker, ed. Select translations from old English 

prose. 

Dyer, T. F. T. Folk-lore of Shakespeare. 

Harrison, William. Elizabethan England. 

Hazlitt, W. C. ed. Shakespeare's library. 6v. 

Heller, Otto. Studies in modern German literature. 

Johnson, R. U. Poems of war and peace. 

Kane, W. R. 1001 places to sell manuscripts. 

Leacock, Stephen. Moonbeams from the larger lunacy. 

Lee, Sidney. Shakespeare and the modern stage. 

Maeterlinck, Maurice. Aglavaine and Selysette. 

Buried temple. 

Intruder, etc. 

Joyzelle, Monna Yanna. 

Mary Magdalene. 

Our eternity. 

Pelleas and Melisande. 

Princess Maleine. 

Unknown guest. 

Wisdom and destiny. 
Good Friday and other poems. 
William Shakespeare. 



Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
Matterlinck, Maurice. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
Masefield, John. 
Masefield, John. 



Matthews, J. B. Shakespeare as a playwright. 

Moulton, R. G. Modern study of literature. 

Noyes, Alfred. Lord of misrule, etc. 

Palmer, A. F. Marriage cycle. 

Pattee, F. L. History of American literature since 1870. 

Perry, Bliss. Fishing with a worm. 

Phelps, W. L. Advance of the English novel. 



136 



821 P54a 

822.08 P61 
824 R29co 

808.9 S313e 
822.33 S44 
824 S53h 

822 S53a 
832 S94m 
832 S94mo 
832 S94r 

822.08 T33 
822.33 T39 

840.9 V74h 
824 W85m 
809.2 W98 



Phillips, Stephen 
Pierce, J. A. ed. 
Repplier, Agnes. 
Schauffler, R. H. 
Seccomb & Allen 
Sharp, D. L 
Shaw, G. B. 



Armageddon. 
Masterpieces of modern drama. 
Counter-currents, 
ed. Easter. 

Age of Shakespeare. 2v. 
Hills of Hingham. 
Androcles and the lion, etc. 



2v. 



Sudermann, Hermann. Magda. 
Sudermann, Hermann. Morituri. 
Sudermann, Hermann. Roses. 
Thayer, W. R. ed. Best Elizabethan plays. 
Thorndike, A. H. Shakespeare's theatre. 
Vincent, L. H. Hotel de Rambouillet, etc. 
Woodbridge, Elizabeth. More Jonathan papers. 
Wynne, Arnold. Growth of English drama. 



BIOGRAPHY 



92 A133 
92 A159 
92 K647 
920 B72 
92 B791 
922 B95 
92 H222c 
92 D512 
92E131 
92 B286e 
92 B318 
92 I12h 
92 P853 
92 L457 
92 K628p 
92 S632 
92 B442m 
92 P761 
92 H835r 
92 S527s 
92 A568 
92 M267t 
92 T765 



Abbott, Lyman. Reminiscences. 
Abraham, J. J. Surgeon's log. 
Begbie, Harold. Kitchener, organizer of victory. 
Bradford, Gamaliel. Union portraits. 
Brooke, Rupert. Letters from America. 
Burton, M. E. Comrades in service. 
Child, Harold. Thomas Hardy. 
Dewey, George. Autobiography. 
Eastman, C. A. From the deep woods to civilization. 
Epler, P. H. Life of Clara Barton. 
Harlow, S. R. Life of S. Roswell Bates. 
Heller, Otto. Henrik Ibsen. 
Hodges, George. Henry Codman Potter. 
Lazarovich-Hrebelianovich, E. C. Pleasures and palaces. 
Palmer, John. Rudyard Kipling. 
Livingstone, W. P. Mary Slessor of Calabar. 
Martindale, C. C. Life of Monsignor R. H. Benson. 2v. 
*Polk, W. M. Leonidas Polk. 2v. 
Richards and others. Julia Ward Howe. 2v. 
Smeaton, Oliphant. Shakespeare, his life and work. 
*Speer, R. E. One girl's influence. 
Thomas, Edward. Maurice Maeterlinck. 
Trudeau, E. L. Autobiography. 

*Vital records of Boxborough, Bridgewater, Burlington. 
Cambridge, New Ashford, Richmond, Salisbury, West- 
ford. 



137 



DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

915.69 B41 Bell, Archie. Spell of the Holy Land. 

914.3 B48 Bigelow, Poultney. Prussian memories. 
917.2 B61 *Blichfeldt, E. H. Mexican journey. 
910 C54f *Clark,F. E. Fellow travellers. 

914.6 C54 Clark, Keith. Spell of Spain. 

919.9 D72 Doorley, G. S. Voyages of the " Morning. " 

917.44 F56 *Fitt, A. P. All about Northfield. 

917.2 F85 Franck, H. A. Tramping through Mexico, etc. 

918.2 F86 Fraser, J.F. Amazing Argentine. 

917.2 H12 Hagar, G.J. Plain facts about Mexico. 

917.4 H13 Hale, L. C. We discover New England, 
914.4 H25 Hartt, R. L. Understanding the French. 

915.2 196 *Iyenaga, Toyokichi. Japan's real attitude to America. 
917.4 J62h Johnson, Clifton. Highways and byways of New England. 
917.422 K55 Kilbourne, F. W. Chronicles of the White Mountains. 

917.3 M89 Muir,John. Thousand-mile walk to the Gulf . 

917.2 053 O'Shaughnessy, Edith. Diplomat's wife in Mexico. 
808.9 P93 Pringle & Urann. Yule-tide in many lands. 

917.3 R34 Rhodes, Harrison. In vacation America. 

916.8 S43 Scully, W. C. Lodges in the wilderness. 
914.15 S84 Stevenson, B. E. Charm of Ireland. 

917.98 S93 Stuck, Hudson. Ten thousand miles with a dog sled. 

919.9 T84 Turley, Charles. Voyages of Captain Scott. 
917.1 W85 Wood, R. K. Tourist's maritime provinces. 
917.89 Y85 Young, S. H. Alaska days with John Muir. 



HISTORY 



913.3 B22 Banks, E.J. Seven wonders of the ancient world. 

940.9 B61 *Bland, J. O. P. Germany's violations of the laws of war. 

940.9 H32 Hay, Ian. pseud. First hundred thousand. 

940.9 H43 Herrick, Robert. World decision. 

973 J98 Jusserand, J. J. With Americans of past and present days. 

940.9 M 14 *MacDonagh, Michael. Irish at the front. 

970.1 P75 Poast, F. M. Indian names, facts and games. 

940.9 P99 Pyke, Geoffrey. To Ruhleben— and back. 

940.9 T33 Thayer, W. R. Germany vs. civilization. 

973.3 T72g Trevelyan, Sir. G. O. George the third and Charles Fox. 

2v. 

940.9 W46 Wells, H. G. What is coming? 

940.9 W85 Wood, E. F. Note-book of an attache. 

355 W85 Wood, E. F. Writing on the wall. 

138 



FICTION 

Aldrich, Mildred. Told in a French garden. 

Andrews, M. R. S. Old Glory. 

Arnim, Grafin von. Fraulein Schmidt and Mr. Anstruther. 

Bank, W. D. Treasure. 

Barr, A. E. *Border shepherdess. 

Bartlett, F. O. Wall Street girl. 

Bates, S. C. Geranium lady. 

Bell, J. J. Misadventures of Joseph. 

Bennett, E. A. Lion's share. 

Bennett, E. A. Man from the north. 

Benson, E. F. David Blaize. 

Bindloss, Harold. Coast of adventure. 

Bosher, K. L. People like that. 

Bottome, Phyllis. Dark tower. 

Bradley, Shelland. More adventures of an A. D. C. 

Brebner, P. J. Master detective. 

Brown, Alice. The prisoner. 

Buckrose, Mrs. J. E. The roundabout. 

Burnham, C. L. Instead of the thorn. 

Chittenden, Gerald. Anvil of chance. 

Cleghorn, S. N. The spinster. 

Cobb, I. S. Old Judge Priest. 

Day, Holman. Blow the man down. 

Deland, Margaret. Rising tide. 

Delano, E. B. June. 

Doyle, Sir A. C. Round the red lamp. 

Duncan, Frances. Roberta of Roseberry gardens. 

Eaton, W. P. Birdhouse man. 

Fisher, D. C. Real motive. 

Forman, J. M. Twin sisters. 

Fuller, Anna. Pratt portaits. 

Garland, Hamlin. They of the high trails. 

Gielow, M. S. *Light on the hill. 

Gilman, D. F. Bloom of youth. 

Glasgow, Ellen. Life and Gabriella. 

Green, A. K. Filigree ball. 

Grimshaw, Beatrice. My lady of the island. 

Hannay, J. O. Gossamer. 

Hodges, Arthur. Pincus Hood. 

Hopkins, W. J. Those Gillespies. 

Hough, Emerson. Magnificent adventure. 

Howells, W. D. Leatherwood god. 

Hughes, Rupert. Clipped wings. 

Jacobs, W. W. Sailor's knots. 

139 



Johnson, F. K. The beloved son. 

Johnston, Mary. Fortunes of Garin. 

KelJerman, Bernard. The tunnel. 

Kendall, Oswald. Romance of the Martin Connor. 

King, Basil. Side of the angels. 

King, Grace. Pleasant ways of St. Medard. 

Kingsley, F. M. Heart of Philura. 

Lagerlof, Selma. Emperor of Portugallia. 

Lane, Mrs. John. Maria again. 

Lighton, W. R. Happy Hollow farm. 

Lincoln, J. C. Mary 'Gusta. 

Locke, \Y. J. Wonderful year. 

Lucas, E. V. Vermilion box. 

Lutz, G. L. H. *Best man. 

McCutcheon, G. B. Mr. Bingle. 

McCutcheon, G. B. The Sherrods. 

MacFarlane. A. E. Behind the bolted door? 

Maher. R. M. Shepherd of the north. 

Marshall, Archibald. Watermeads. 

Martin, G. M. Emmy Lou's road to grace. 

Miller, A. D. Come out of the kitchen. 

Monroe, A. S. Happy Valley. 

O'Brien, E. J. ed. Best short stories of 1915. 

Olmstead, Florence. Father Bernard's parish. 

Onions, Mrs. Oliver. His official fiancee. 

Onions, Mrs. Oliver. In another girl's shoes. 

Oppenheim, E. P. Kingdom of the blind. 

nham, John. Broken shackles. 
Parker, Sir. Gilbert. World for sale. 
Phillpotts, Eden. Good red earth. 
Phillpotts, Eden. Green alleys. 
Phillpotts. Eden. Human boy and the war. 
Pratt, Lucy. Felix tells it. 
Prichard, K. S. Pioneers. 
Prouty, O. H. Fifth wheel. 
Pryce, Richard. David Penstephen. 
Richmond, G. L. S. Under the country sky. 
Rideout, H. M. White tiger. 
Rinehart. M. R. Tish. 
Sherwood, Margaret. Worn doorstep. 
Showerman, Grant. Country chronicle. 
Silberrad, U. L. Co-directors. 
Sinclair, May. The belfry. 
Smith, F. H. & F. B. Enoch Crane. 
Snaith. J. C. The sailor. 
Spearman, F. H. Nan of Music mountain. 

140 



Stoothof, Ellenor. The nightingale. 

Strother, E. V. Eve Dorre. 

Tarkington, Booth. Penrod and Sam. 

Tarkington, Booth. Seventeen. 

Tompkins, J. W. Diantha. 

Tompkins, J. W. Seed of the righteous. 

Turnbull, Margaret. Handle with care. 

Vachell, H. A. Spragge's canyon. 

Van Loan, C. E. Buck Parvin and the movies. 

Van Schaick, George. Son of the otter. 

Walpole, Hugh. Gods and Mr. Perrin. 

Walsh, J. H. Cam Clarke. 

Ward, Mrs. M. A. A. Lady Connie. 

Warner, Anne. Susan Clegg and her love affairs. 

Watts, M. S. The rudder. 

Waugh, J. L. Betty Grier. 

W'ebster, H. K. The real adventure. 

Wells, Carolyn. Curved blades. 

W T ells, H. G. Mr. Britling sees it through. 

White, S. E. Gray dawn. 

Whitman, Stephen. Children of hope. 

Wiggin, K. D. Romance of a Christmas. card. 

Williams, W. W. Whirligig of time. 

Williamson, C. X. & A. M. Lightning conductor discovers America. 

Willsie, Honore. Still Jim. 

Wilson, H. L. Somewhere in Red Gap. 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS; NON-FICTION 

680 A21 Adams, J. D. When Mother lets us carpenter. 

92 C873al Allen, C. F. David Crockett, scout. 

973 B 19c Baldwin, James. Conquest of the old northwest. 

292 B19g Baldwin, James. Golden fleece. 

92 P427b Barnes, James. Hero of Erie. 

633 B43 Bengston, N. A. Wheat industry. ' 

641 B44f Benton, C. F. Fun of cooking. 

923.5 B57 Blaisdell& Ball. Heroic deeds of American sailors. 

942 B57 Blaisdell, A. F. Stories from English history. 

92 L134b Brooks, E. S. True story of Lafayette. 

923 B95 Burton, A. H. Four American patriots. 

796 C18 Carey, A. C. Scout law in practice. 

600 C38 Chase and Clow. Stories of industry. 2v. 

523 C69 Collins, A. F. Book of stars. 

821.08 C837 Coussens, P. W. comp. Poems children love. 

352.3 C88 Crump, Irving. Boys' book of firemen. 

141 



808.9 D56t 

917.19 D96 
917.8 F15 
320 F46 
292 G13 
821.08 G16 
973 G93g 
793 H14hg 
92 P385h 
551.4 147 
919.8 K13 
92 R135k 
746 K681 
917.19 K51 
917.94 K51 
920 L25 

973.1 L96 

398.2 M 17 
796 M17 
973.1 M22 
92 C884m 

914.7 M72 
92 A354m 
827 042 

821.08 043s 
630 R63 

92 H135r 
590 S49a 
590 S49wi 
398.4 S62 
821.08 S84ho 

970.1 S79 
537 S14t 

654 S14t 

398.2 S84 
973 S87d 
92 F959s 
942 T16 
92 A392t 
92 V667t 
740 T33 
398.2 W25 
566 W56 
973 W93 



Dickinson, A. D. comp. Children's book of Thanksgiving 
stories. 

*Dwight, M. L. Children of Labrador. 
Fairbanks, H. W. Western United States. 
Field & Nearing. Community civics. 
Gale, A. C. Achilles and Hector. 

Grahame, Kenneth, comp. Cambridge book of poetry. 
Guerber, H. A. Story of the great republic. 
Hall & Perkins. Handicraft for handy girls. 
Holland, R. S. William Penn. 
Ingersoll, Ernest. Book of the ocean. 
Kane, E. K. Adrift in the Arctic ice pack. 
Kelly, M . D . Story of Sir Walter Raleigh . 
Klickmann, Flora, ed. Little girl's knitting & crochet book. 
Koch, F. J. Little journey to northern wilds. 
Koch, F. J. Little journey to our western wonderland. 
Lang, Mrs. Andrew. Red book of heroes. 
Lucia, Rose. Stories of American discoverers. 
MacGregor, Mary. Stories of King Arthur's knights. 
McGuire & Matthews, ed. Boy scouts' year book. 
McMurry, C. A. Pioneers of the Mississippi valley. 
Marshall, H. E. Story of Oliver Cromwell. 
Mokrievitch, V. deB. When I was a boy in Russia. 
Moses, Belle. Louisa May Alcott. 
Olcott & Pendleton, ed. Jolly book for boys and girls. 
Olcott, F. J. comp. Story-telling poems. 
Rogers, J. E. Book of useful plants. 
Root, J. C. Nathan Hale. 
Seton, E. T. Animal heroes. 
Seton, E. T. Wild animal ways. 
Skinner, E. L. & A. M. comp. Merry tales. 
Stevenson, B. E. ed. Home book of verse for young folks. 
Starr, Frederick. American Indians. 

St. John, T. M. Things a boy should know about elec- 
tricity. 

St. John, T. M. Things a boy should know about wireless. 

Stevens & Allen. King Arthur stories from Mallory. 

Stone & Fickett. Days and deeds a hundred years ago. 

Sutcliffe, A. C. Robert Fulton. 

Tappan, E. M. England's story. 

Tappan, E. M. In the days of Alfred the Great. 

Tappan, E. M. In the days of Queen Victoria. 

Thayer, E. R. L. When Mother lets us draw. 

Warren, M. R. King Arthur and his knights. 

Wheeler, F. Rolt. Monster hunters. 

Wright, H. C. Children's stories of American progress. 



142 



STORIES FOR CHILDREN 

Altsheler, J. A. Last of the chiefs. 

Altsheler, J. A. Rock of Chickamauga. 

Ashmun, Margaret. Isabel Carleton's year. 

Bailey, R. R. Sure Pop and the safety scouts. 

Barbour, R. H. Crimson sweater. 

Brown, E. A. Archer and the "Prophet." 

Brownjohn, John. Adventures of Miltiades Peterkin Paul. 

Camp, Walter. Danny Fists. 

Chase, M. E. Girl from the Big Horn country. 

Claudy, C. H. Partners of the forest trail. 

Connolly, J. B. Jeb Hutton. 

Daulton, A. M. Marooning of Peggy. 

Deland, E. D. Successul venture. 

Dimock, A. W. Be prepared. 

Dudley, A. T. Unofficial prefect. 

Duncan, Norman. Adventures of Billy Topsail. 

Eaton, W. P. Peanut, cub reporter. 

Eggleston, G. C. Bale marked circle X. 

Forrester, I. L. Greenacre girls. 

Haskell, H. E. Katrinka. 

Hawkes, Clarence. King of the thundering herd. 

Hunt, C. W. About Harriet. 

Jacobs, C. E. Joan of Juniper Inn. 

Jacobs, C. E. Joan's jolly vacation. 

Jacobs and Richards. Blue Bonnet keeps house. 

Kneeland, C. A. Smugglers' island. 

Meigs, Cornelia. Kingdom of the winding road. 

Meyer, J. A. Green C. 

Ogden, Ruth. Little Pierre and Big Peter. 

Peattie, E. W. Lotta Embury's career. 

Perkins, L. F. Dutch twins. 

Perkins, L. F. Mexican twins. 

Piper, M. R. Princess and the clan. 

Pyle, Howard. Men of iron. 

Remick, G. M. Jane Stuart at Rivercroft. 

Remick, G. M. Jane Stuart, comrade. 

Seaman, A. H. Sapphire signet. 

Thurston, I. T. *Just girls. 

Wallace, Dillon. Fur trail adventurers. 

Wallace, Dillon. Gaunt gray wolf. 

Wallace, Dillon. Ungava Bob. 

Wheeler, F. Rolt. Boy with the U. S. Mail. 



143 



REPORT OF CUSTODIAN 
JOHN CORNELL ART GALLERY 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the gallery for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1916. 

The attendance for the year has been 600. Of the number 
146 were adults, and 454 children. The attendance for 1915 was 
668. Fully one half of the number of adults visiting the gallery 
have been strangers. Though many have had only a few min- 
utes to spare they have felt well repaid for the long hurried climb. 
Many of the townspeople do not realize that few towns possess 
such a collection as Andover owns in the Cornell Art Gallery. 
People from Lawrence and other cities often emphasize the fact, 
and query if the people really appreciate what it means to have 
access to such choice reproductions. 

When one ponders on the fact that many people frequently 
visit Boston, but never enter the Public Library or Art Museum, 
one is less surprised at the non-appearance of such people at the 
gallery. It is a regrettable fact that many of our educated 
young people deliberately choose the moving picture show when 
in Boston to the varied forms of art obtainable there. This is also 
true in town. One is willing to acknowledge that many of the 
movies present educational features, but taken as a whole, 
they cannot be called uplifting. 

A much-needed improvement to the comfort of the gallery 
has been supplied in the weather strips for the windows. People 
occupying the window seats have found them far from comfort- 
able, and will accordingly appreciate the absence of cold air which 
has been plentiful. It is hoped that 1917 will record an increased 
attendance at the gallery. 

Respectfully submitted 

ABBIE S. DAVIS 

Custodian 



144 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL 

REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



EMBRACING THE TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 
WATER COMMISSIONERS AND TWENTIETH 
ANNUAL REPORT OF SEWER 
COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1916 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1917 



JOHN H. FLINT 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 
1889—1899 

*JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
FELIX G. HAYNES 



SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



1893—1894 

*WM. S. JENKINS 
JOHN L. SMITH 
CHAS. E. ABBOTT 



1894—1899 

*WM. S. JENKINS 
JOHN L. SMITH 
JOHN E. SMITH 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 
1899—1902 1903—1906 



JOHN H. FLINT 

*WM. S. JENKINS 

JOHN L. SMITH 

* JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 

FELIX G. HAYNES 

1906—1907 

FELIX G. HAYNES 
JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy 
LEWIS T. HARDY 
HARRY M. EAMES 

1908—1912 

LEWIS T. HARDY 
JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy. 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 

1914—1916 

THOS. E. RHODES, ('17) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
*LEWIS T. HARDY, ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Sec'y('18) 
WILLISB. HODGKINS, Treas. CI 8) 



JOHN L. SMITH 
FELIX G. HAYNES 
JOHN W. BELL 
LEWIS T. HARDY 
JAMES C. SAWYER 

1907—1908 

FELIX G. HAYNES 
JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Secy. 
LEWIS T. HARDY 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

1913—1914 

"LEWIS T. HARDY ('16; 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN C15) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Sec'y ('14) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. 

1916 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES (' 17) 
ANDREW McTERNEN, ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y('19) 
WILLI SB.HODGKINS.Treas. C18) 



SUPERINTENDENT 

FRANK L. COLE 



'Deceased. 



REPORT OF 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



To the Citizens of A ndover: 

Your Board of Public Works submit their fourth annual 
report, or, if we include the former Board, organized in 1899, 
the seventeenth report for the year ending December 31, 1916, 
This is also the twenty-eighth of the Water System, and the 
twentieth of the Sewer System. 

Election 

The choice of the voters resulted in the re-election of Barnett 
Rogers, and the election of Charles B. Baldwin, succeeding 
Lewis T. Hardy, who, on account of ill health, had declined to 
be a candidate for re-election. Both of the successful candidates 
were chosen for a term of three years. 

Organization 

At the first meeting held on March 6th the following were 
elected: — Chairman, Barnett Rogers; secretary, Charles B. 
Baldwin; treasurer, Willis B. Hodgkins. 

A new contract, expiring March 15, 1917, was entered into 
with Superintendent Frank L. Cole; salary agreed upon S2250. 

A Tribute 

Before proceeding further in reviewing the work of the past 
year it is well that we pay the respect which is due those whose 
careers, now ended, were, without question, a very great asset 
to our town. 



John'H. Flint, having served as Water Commissioner for 
ten years, was elected to the Board in 1899, chosen to be 
its first chairman, and served in that capacity while a member 
of the Board, retiring in 1902. Mr. Flint died November 30, 
1916. 

Lewis T. Hardy was a member of the Board from 1903 to 1916, 
serving as chairman from 1908 to 1914 inclusive. Mr. Hardy 
died December 25, 1916. 

New England conservatism, coupled with rare business ability 
and keen foresight, meant much to Andover in the days when the 
ever-increasing demands for the adoption of new ideas and 
modern conveniences might have proved very costly to a com- 
munity less efficiently managed. 

What better monument could be erected to the memory of 
these men than the "public works" for which they were in a 
large measure responsible, now so thoroughly appreciated and 
enjoyed by those who make Andover their home. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

Questions concerning the extension of the water mains as 
discussed at the March Town Meeting are a matter of record. 
Under Article 13 the town voted to apply to the Legislature for 
permission to issue bonds to the extent of $10,000, to allow such 
extensions as might be considered necessary. 

A bill, Chapter No. 262, Acts 1916, passed both branches of 
the Legislature and was approved by the Governor April 20th, 
in ample time to incorporate an Article in the warrant for the 
special town meeting held on June 12th; this being necessary 
to authorize the sale of bonds; the proceeds to be used towards 
the extension of water mains. 

The town for the first time in its history voted to restrict or 
limit the Board in the expenditure of this money; the result being 
only one-half of the amount — $5000 — was available for the 
extension of the water system during the past year. 

We do not question this procedure, and simply make mention 
of it here to explain why certain applications have been tabled 
or referred back with the suggestion that the same be taken care 
of by an article in the warrant, to be passed on by the voters, 



Reference to our Superintendent's report will show that this 
money has been expended as follows: — 

Bellevue Road from Osgood St., a distance of 
about 2800 ft. $2677 45 

Ballardvale Road from Woburn St., a dis- 
tance of about 1021 ft. 891 97 

Woburn St., from the Ripley Farm to Spring 
Grove Cemetery, a distance of about 
1400 ft. 1538 47 



$5107 89 



The above added to the present system makes the mileage 
51.19 miles — an increase of 1.19 miles. 

There have been added during the year the following: — 
Service pipes, 27; meters, 28; hydrants, 8 

Revenue and maintenance per million gallons for the past 
five years (See comparative statistics) are as follows: — 





Received 


Maintenance 


Increase 


1912 . . . 


. . 95.99 


39.58 


56 41 


1913 . . . 


. . 96.58 


36.84 


59.74 


1914 . . . 


. . 83.47 


43.86 


39.61 


1915 . . . 


. . 93.32 


42.49 


50.83 


1916 . . . 


. . 94.02 


46.67 


47.35 



Certain figures as shown in our Superintendent's report may 
require an explanation, as follows: — 







Gallons 


Daily 


Pumping 


Water 




Days 


Pumped 


Average 


Hours 


Receipts 


1915 . ' 


. 365 


240,599,178 


659175 


3509 


#22451 01 


1916 . 


. 366 


220,945,880 


603677 


3402 . 56 


323496 87 



From the above it would appear that nearly 20,000,000 gallons 
less were pumped in 1916 than in 1915, although there was an 
increase of $1045.86 in the water rates. 

It is quite evident that this is due to the fact that prior to the 
time when the pumps were overhauled the same were not record- 
ing correctly, and that in reality during 1915, and possibly 

7 



certain of the preceding years, the quantity pumped was con- 
siderably less than is shown by the table. 

Your Board recommends that the sum of $11,000 be appro- 
priated for maintenance, and S1500 for construction. 

The Water Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the Water System is $172,000.00: there 
have been paid during the year 1916 $8000.00 of the 4°^ bonds, 
and S3000.00 of the 3} 2 ^ bonds. There were also sold in 1916 
bonds to the amount of $10,000.00. authorized by the town 
in 1916. 

Of the above amount of indebtedness $50,000.00 is redeemable 
by sinking funds, which amount to $34,090.83. and an appro- 
priation of $750 is asked for the Sinking Funds. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

Sewer extensions during 1916 were all put in at the direction 
of the Board of Health as follows: — 

400 ft. from dead-end on So. Main Street 
1140 ft. on Ridge St.. and lower end of School Street 
For particulars as to costs see report of our Superintendent. 

The Abbott Milage sewer, so-called, although now a part of 
the sewer system, the same having been finished and accepted 
by the Board, is working satisfactorily. 

With the completion of the system the Board felt compelled 
to bring to the attention of our citizens the injustice of the vote 
passed at the special town meeting held March 31, 1915, by 
which owners of estates in the territory embraced by this system 
were assessed 75°} of the cost, which was estimated by our 
engineer to be $3.60 per running foot. Accordingly a special 
town meeting was held on Monday. June 12th. when that 
portion of the vote above referred to was rescinded, and a new 
vote passed, substantially the same as that recommended by the 
Board of Public Works in their report of 1900. viz.. Fifty (50) 
cents to be assessed on each foot of lot frontage, and five (5) mills 
per square foot on the area; no estate to be assessed to a depth 



exceeding 120 ft., and an allowance of 60 ft. frontage to apply 
on corner lots, or approximately 1.10 per running foot. 

While this put a greater burden on the taxpayers as a whole, 
the good name which Andover has enjoyed for so many years 
would, in the judgment of the Board, never permit such dis- 
crimination towards this or any section of the town. It is 
pleasing to note that the voters were practically unanimous in 
supporting the Board's contention. 

Pump House 

In order to put this matter clearly before our citizens we have 
asked our engineer to submit a report, which is as follows : — 

Andover, Mass., January 25, 1917 

To the Board of Public Works, 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

In the matter of installing centrifugal pumps, 
motors, etc., at the pump station, on North Main 
Street near Stimson's bridge, to lift the sewerage from 
that point to the outlet sewer on High Street, I have to 
report as follows: — 

The apparatus consists of two centrigufal pumps and 
two 25-horsepower vertical motors, together with 
necessary connections, automatic starting and stop- 
device, switchboard, etc. 

The pumps were first ready to try out about the 
middle of June last. The pumps were started up and 
run for about an hour, when it was discovered that the 
outlet sewer on High Street was not able to take care 
of the discharge from the pumps in addition to the 
sewerage it was already carrying. This was due partly 
to the fact that the inverted siphon into which the sewer 
discharges became airbound, and partly to the fact that 
the 15-inch sewer emptied into a 12-inch iron pipe 
about 800 or 900 feet from the head of the siphon, thus 
reducing its capacity nearly one-third. 



To remove this difficulty it was necessary to extend 
the 8-inch force-main down High Street for a distance 
of about 1200 feet to the head of the siphon below the 
air-pocket. This arrangement made the total length of 
the force-main 2460 feet, and the total static head or 
lift 84 feet. 

After the work of putting in this extension of the force- 
main was completed, the pumps were again tried. Some 
mechanical defects developed. It was found necessary 
to change the oiling system. It was also discovered 
that the main thrust-bearings of the pumps heated to 
such an extent that it was impractical to operate them. 
This condition was due to the high speed at which the 
pumps were driven, and the heavy load carried by the 
pumps. Ball bearings were installed to remedy this 
condition with very satisfactory results. 

By the conditions of the contract each pump was 
guaranteed to pump not less than 15,000 gallons of 
sewerage per hour under the conditions specified. Very 
careful tests were made and exact results ascertained 
which were substantially as follows: — 

Each pump, when operated under a full head, 
pumped 30,000 gallons of sewerage per hour. Each 
pump, when first started consumed about 25 horse- 
power, but this was reduced, after the pump had been 
in operation for a few minutes, to 17 horsepower, at 
which figure it remained until the pump was stopped. 
This is a little better than the estimate which was about 
183^2 horsepower. The motors are able to do the work 
with ease, and run very smoothly. The automatic 
starting and stopping device works well. 

To pump all of the sewerage now being discharged 
in the storage tank in twenty-four hours, one pump is 
in operation about three hours out of twenty-four. 
Thus each pump is capable of doing about eight times 
the work now required of it. 

The cost of power for pumping is about $17.00 per 
million gallons. 

10 



The total amount expended to date for everything 
connected with the sewer is $73652.10, which in de- 
tail, is as follows: — 

Previously reported (See Annual Report 

Dec. 31, 1915) $50085 98 

Cenedella & Co. 10823 21 

Pump House 3194 12 

Lawrence Gas Co. 1965 00 

Engineering and Superintending 1117 36 

Rights of Way 219 05 

Extensions of force-main 2000 00 

Filter Beds and Miscellaneous 4247 38 



$73652 10 



(Signed) JOHN FRANKLIN 

Engineer 



Your Board recommends that the sum of $2500 be appro- 
priated for maintenance. This is $700 in excess of the amount 
asked for Jast year, and is needed to meet the cost of power 
required in operating the motors at the pump house. 

The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the Sewer System is $115,000. In 1916 
Abbott Village Sewer bonds to the amount of $15,000 were sold, 
which completed the issue of $75,000, as authorized by the town. 

Of the above amount of indebtedness $40,000 is redeemable 
by sinking funds, which amount to $19479.50, and an appro- 
priation of $1000 is asked for the Sinking Fund. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The purpose of the Board as expressed in previous reports, 
to continue the rebuilding of streets radiating from the centre, 
was unanimously approved at the first meeting held on March 

11 



6th, although the difficulties due to the advance in the price of 
material, the growing tendency to increase wages, and the 
scarcity of labor, were not fully appreciated or anticipated. 

Fortunately our Superintendent had the forethought to secure 
quite a few quotations at the prevailing rates to apply on future 
deliveries, and in some cases options, subject to the approval of 
the Board, which together with the announced decision of the 
Board to secure bids, made it possible to accomplish most of the 
work planned for, and keep within the appropriation; neverthe- 
less, the construction work, repairs, etc., have cost approxi- 
mately $5000 more than would have been necessary in 1915. 

This is important, and cannot be lost sight of in determining 
the amount to be appropriated for 1917, if the beginning which 
has been made in the way of permanent road building, in so far 
as this is possible, is to be followed up. 

We might also mention that the work done on our streets 
during the past year has been accomplished with a less number 
of men and teams than ever before in the history of the town, 
in so far as we have been able to determine, although this is not 
all to the credit of the Board, as the scarcity of labor made it 
impossible to secure or retain for any length of time all that were 
really needed. 

We very much regret that the lack of funds did not permit 
the completion of Central Street to the Boston & Maine Railroad 
bridge; this being the most direct roadway between the Centre 
and Ballard vale. It is perhaps needless to say that this will have 
the consideration of the Board when the plans for the coming 
season are being worked out. Attention is also called to the 
Central Street bridge over the Shawsheen River, which is prac- 
tically beyond repair. It is the opinion of the Board that this 
ought to be replaced by a permanent and attractive bridge 
during the coming year. 

Central street as originally laid out was approximately 28 
feet in width. Owing to the fact that the street was not as 
extensively traveled as some others the Board concluded that 
an 18-foot roadway would answer all purposes. Furthermore, 
by narrowing up the roadway the expense would be lessened, 
thus extending the work of reconstruction a greater distance 

12 



than would be possible otherwise. This being accomplished it 
was suggested by the Board through the columns of the Towns- 
man that the abutters on each side of the road grass over that 
portion between the tarvia and the sidewalk. This would do 
much to preserve the roadway, and add greatly to the attractive- 
ness of the entire street. 

Outlying Districts 

The condition of the roads in the West district as reported at 
the March town meeting by the residents of that section has 
had the consideration of the Board, and while certain repairs 
have been made, it is difficult to make much of a showing in this 
or other outlying districts, which are equally as bad, without the 
expenditure of a considerable amount of money. To discriminate 
against one section to the advantage of another is sure to create 
dissatisfaction from many sources, and we trust, therefore, that 
our petition for an increased appropriation, to continue the 
rebuilding of our highways, will have the support of those who 
favor good country roads, in order that a beginning at least 
can be made in the outlying districts. 

Your Board recommends that the sum of $32,000 be appro- 
priated for highways, and in addition the railroad franchise and 
excise tax, also the tax for sprinkling. 

Lowell Street 

It was particularly disappointing to the Board that those 
having the matter in charge met with so little success in per- 
suading the State and County to contribute $5000 each; the 
Town having contributed its part, towards the further re- 
building of this road. For a time it seemed as if the 50% finally 
authorized would not be forthcoming, as orders to proceed with 
the work were not received until October 2nd. 

The Board has put itself on record in a letter to the Selectmen, 
urging that every possible effort be made to secure all that was 
promised last year, viz., $15,000, one-third to be contributed by 
the town. 

This is the main artery of travel between Andover and Lowell, 
and the completion of this road will undoubtedly mean much 
to the business interests of our town, for the automobiles which 

13 



• The Moderator declared: — 

Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Treasurer for one year. 

Walter S. Donald elected Selectman for three years. 

Walter S. Donald elected Assessor for three years. 

John W. Bell elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 

Frederic G. Moore elected School Committee for three years. 

Philip F. Ripley elected School Committee for three years. 

Mary Byers Smith elected School Committee for three years. 

Samuel H. Boutwell elected Trustee of Punchard Free School 
for three years. 

Frank T. Carlton elected Trustee of Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Harry M. Eames elected Trustee of Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Myron E. Gutterson elected Trustee of Punchard Free School 
for three years. 

Harry H. Noyes elected Trustee of Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Charles B. Baldwin elected Board of Public Works and Sinking 
Fund Commission for three years. 

Barnett Rogers elected Board of Public Works and Sinking 
Fund Commission for three years. 

Charles E. Abbott elected Board of Health for three years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Nesbit G. Gleason elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

14 



Chester N. Lawrence elected Constable for one year. 
George \V. Mears elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

Alfred E. Stearns elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for seven years. 

John H. Playdon elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund — Allan Simpson, for three 
years. 

Chose Fence Viewers for one year — James Saunders, Raymond 
L. Buchan, George W. Mears. 

Chose Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery for three years — 
John L. Smith, Felix G. Haynes, Oliver W. Vennard, George D. 
Millett, John W. Bell, Daniel H. Poor, Walter I. Morse. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee — Barnett Rogers, Walter H. 
Coleman, Colver J. Stone, Charles B. Baldwin, Henry J. Gardner. 

And voted that Lighting Committee be authorized to make 
contract for Street Lighting for a term not exceeding three years. 

Chose Finance Committee for one year (appointed by the 
Moderator) — George Abbot, Samuel H. Boutwell, John H. Cam- 
pion, Walter M. Lamont, Henry W. Barnard, Chester W. 
Holland. 

Town Pound — Voted, That Town Barn and Barnyard be the 
Town Pound and that the Superintendent of the Town Farm 
be the keeper. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted, To appropriate the following stated sums of money: 

Almshouse Expenses S 4200 00 

Repairs on Almshouse 450 00 

Relief out of Almshouse 4300 00 

Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 500 00 



Amount carried forward $9450 00 

15 



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"2 2 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



To redeem Water Loans 



Balance, January 1, 1916 
Appropriation, March 6, 1916 
Interest on deposits 



Water Loan Funds deposited 
Andover Savings Bank 
Andover National Bank 



To redeem Sewer Loans 

Balance, January 1, 1916 
Appropriation, March 6, 1916 
Assessments, 1916 
Interest on Deposits 



Sewer Loan Funds deposited 
Andover National Bank 



Dr. 












No. 


1 


due 1920 




S10000 00 


No. 


2 


a 


1922 




10000 00 


No. 


3 


1 1 


1923 




10000 00 


No. 


4 


a 


1925 




15000 00 


No. 


5 


it 


1928 
S3 2046 


29 


5000 00 








750 00 










1294 


54 


34090 83 


Cr. 
















$ 8333 57 










25757 


26 


34090 83 


Dr. 














due 1919 




$10000 00 






u 


$15099 

1000 

2771 

608 


28 
00 
63 
59 


30000 00 

19479 50 
19479 50 


^r. 











BARNETT ROGERS 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 
CHARLES B. BALDWIN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Sinking Fund Commissioners 



Examined, Feb. 6, 1917 

Nesbit G. Gleason 
John S. Robertson 
Walter H. Coleman 

Auditors 



17 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Public Works. 

Gentlemen: — I hereby submit the twenty-eighth annual 
report of the Water Department, the twentieth report of the 
Sewer System, and the fourth annual report of the Highways 
and Parks, for the year ending December 31st, 1916. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

During the year water mains have been extended on Bellevue 
Street from the main line a distance of 2792 feet of 6-inch C. I. 
pipe, at a cost of $2677.45. 

The next extension was Ballard vale Road, a distance of 1021 
feet of 6-inch CI. pipe at a cost of $891.97. 

Third extension Abbot Street from Ripley's farm to Spring 
Grove Cemetery, a distance of 1400 feet of 6-inch C. I. main, 
cost of $1538.47. 

Fourth extension on Corbett Street a distance of 120 feet 
and cost $235.45. 

These additions make the present plant December 31, 1916, 
as follows: — 

Total length of main pipe 51 . 19 miles 

Number of hydrants 377 

Number of public buildings 15 

Number of fountains 8 

Number of standpipes 10 

Number of faucets at Park 3 

Number of private hydrants 34 

Service Pipes 

Applications received were twenty-eight and of these applica- 
tions twenty-seven were laid. The number of feet laid by the 

18 



town from main to street line was 485.5 feet. From street line 
to dwelling 1200.6 feet, the latter being paid for by property 
owners. Relaid 7, making a total on December 31, 1916, of 

617 cement lined 

838 lead lined 
37 other kinds 



1492 total or 116,652 feet 

Meters 

There were set during 1916, 28 new meters, making a total of 
1290 now in use in sizes from 5-8-inch to 3-inch inclusive. 

Pumping Plants 

Haggetts Pond Station 

During 1916 this station ran 366 days, 112 days of which the 
oil engine was used; pumping 70,506,670 gallons in 1326 hours, 
6 minutes, consuming 7917 gallons of fuel oil at 7 cents per gallon. 

The steam plant was used 254 days, 2077 hours, 30 minutes 
running, pumping 150,439,214 gallons and using 219 tons coal. 
Or a grand total of: — 

Days Hours Gallons pumped Oil Coal Average day 

366 3403 220,945,880 7917 219 tons 603,677 " 

I would say early this year the steam plant was thoroughly 
overhauled and the difference may be seen by comparing 1915 
and 1916 reports, which is according to sheets. 

One day more pumping: — 

107 hours less work pumping 
30 million less gallons pumped 
56,000 gallons per day less 
SI, 045. 86 more water rates received 
High service station is still giving good service, but the cost 
of pumping is increasing on this end as we keep a man there now 
most of the time while running. 

I would recommend a duplicate plant be installed here, a 
centrifugal pump, to be run by electricity, at a cost of about 

19 



$1350.00; then we will have duplicate plants and be protected, 
where now we are not. 



Water Meters 

Water rates have increased in 1916, while less water has been 
pumped, S 1045.86. The total amount recieved on water rates 
in 1916 was $23,496.87. This amount could be increased if 
every service pipe was metered, and the consumption reduced. 
All service should be metered. 



Receipts 

bills Maintenance Construction Totals 

Various parties, service, pipes, meters #1234 34 31234 34 

stock and labor #171 62 177 19 348 81 

171 62 1411 53 1583 15 

Water rates #23496 87 

Credits paid Town Treasurer #25080 02 

Water rates #23496 87 

Pipe account? 15S3 15 



#25080 02 #25080 02 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

Work has been done on Main Street, a distance of 400 feet 
of 6-inch sewer, at a cost of $1195.97. 

Ridge Street and School Street ordered by the Board of Health ; 
1140 feet of 6-inch sewer at a cost of S1336.55. 

There was also laid in addition to what was done in 1915. 
1240 feet more of 8-inch C. I. force-main on High Street at a 
cost of $2162.36. 

There have been 63 applications for house connections and 59 
have already been laid, making a total of 766 connections now 

20 



in use. The 59 connections amounted to 3453 feet of Akron 
and iron pipe at an average cost of 64J4 cents per foot. Total 
feet December 31, 46,374 feet. 

There still remain a number of houses in the Abbott Village 
system to connect. 

The new pumping station on Main Street is working satis- 
factorily, it being required to run about three hours out of every 
twenty-four, or about twenty hours per week. 

FRANK L. COLE 

Superintendent 



21 



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RECEIPTS 



BILLS 



Various parties, service pipe and meters 
Various parties, repairs and labor 



Mainte- 
nance 



3171 62 



Service 
Pipe 



31234 34 
166 20 



Pipe 
Distri- 
bution 



Totals 



10 99 



31234 34 
348 81 



Totals 



3171 62J31400 54 



Water rates 



310 99 31583 15 
23496 87 



Credits paid Town Treasurer 
Water Rates .... 
Pipe Account .... 



323496 87 
1583 15 

325080 02 



325080 87 



325080 02 



Approved 

W. H. COLEMAN ) 

J. S. ROBERTSON Auditors 

NESBIT G. GLEASON 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

WATER DEPARTMENT 



Designation 


Summary 

Approved 

Bills 


Credits 


Net Cost 

for 

1916 


Total Cost 

of 

Construction 


Office Fixtures .... 

Pipe Distribution 

Water and Land Drainage . 

Suction Pipe 

Reservoirs 

Coal Shed 

Grading Land .... 

Workshop 

Building Pumping Station . 
Pumping Plants .... 
Construction Expenses . 

Tools 

Maintenance 


#5939 91 
2539 87 

345 95 
12170 22 


# 10 99 
1400 54 

171 62 


#5928 92 
1139 33 

345 95 
11998 60 


# 561 75 

1311 63 

184 77 

583 65 

254405 02 

25093 99 

6687 23 

" 1309 46 

16985 82 

806 97 

1739 12 

1271 88 

9610 14 

44401 83 

9406 21 

3 90 74 


Totals 


#20995 95 


#1583 15 


#19412 80 


#377860 21 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Sewer Mains in feet 


#44105 10 






Number of Filter-beds 




27 




Number of Sludge-beds .... 




3 




Cost to Abutter 






#120862 78 


Cost to the Town 






127108 40 


Totals 






#247971 18 


Includes A. V. Sewer 











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HIGHWAYS AND PARKS 



To the Board of Public Works. 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the fourth annual report of 
the Highway Department, for the year ending December 31, 1916. 

One of the first things we had to do this year was to handle 
the snow question, which was more than usual. The amount 
generally appropriated has been $1500, but this year we had to 
spend handling snow, sanding sidewalks and cleaning ice from 
gutters, $4000. This was taken from our highway department 
appropriation of $28,000, when generally it has been a special 
one. We were fortunate in having $2500 transferred from the 
Lowell Street amount, which helped out, but still the depart- 
ment was out on account of the snow (See detail of expenditure 
report) . 

As soon as possible ashes were started from the Pacific Mills; 
on Holt Street these were started at Salem Street and taken to 
Orchard Street, a distance of about 6000 feet or one and one- 
eighth (1 1-8) miles long; this work after being leveled was well 
rolled and left until summer, when one-half of it was covered 
with a blanket of Tarvia B, which has made a good road for this 
section. The cost of this work all complete was $910.20. 

Ashes were also put on Avon Street, filling in holes and rolling; 
sidewalks were fixed with dust and a few repairs done during 
1916; cost on this street $219.54. 

Ashes were also put on River Road, from Fish Brook to the 
residence of John Maddox, and were put on pretty heavy, as 
this place was very muddy in the spring and fall; this .work cost 
$679.70. 

Patching and blanketing streets is always the first work done, 
cleaning catchbasins, gutters, and oiling streets. Then a few 
small repairs are made; this work done, we started new work 
on Brook Street the last of June. This work amounted to 1450 
feet of curbing, 2088 yards of Tarvia road, new catchbasin, 

29 



changing wall, etc., at a cost of $2671.39 or about 85 cents per 
square yard for road work, balance on curbing. This street 
completed, Central Street was started at Essex Street and 
carried a distance of 2800 feet or about 6000 square yards of 
Tarvia road ; this was blanketed one coat and with catchbasins, 
curbing corners, labor, material, cost $5270.71, or about 87 cents 
per square yard. This was started July 10th, and finished 
August 10th. Chestnut Street was next started on August 11th, 
and finished August 19th, and this, with three grates and catch- 
basins, 100 feet of curbing, labor and material, cost $1258.40 
for 1615 square yards or about 78 cents per square yard. School 
Street was next started on August 21st, and completed September 
22nd; this street was started about 200 feet from Main Street 
and carried to Central Street. All corners not curbed were 
curbed and six catchbasins were built with outlet to a main pipe 
line, which was carried to the brook at the foot of School Street; 
this main pipe line was started at Morton Street and the cost of 
drain-pipe, labor, etc., was SI 180.92. This amount added to 
street cost made the whole job cost $6093.82 for 5989 square 
yards of road, or about $1.02 per square yard, including all work, 
or about 82 cents per square yard for road work. We then moved 
to Lowell Street about October 2nd, where we started at Station 
2800 under direction of Mr. W. T. Laffey, inspector of the 
Massachusetts Highway Association, and continued to Station 
5300 during the work. On account of the rain and holidays five 
days were lost, work being completed on December 9th, with 
the exception of the fence which is now completed. This work 
cost this year $6885.31, the county, State and town being divided 
in thirds. I hope next year this work may be made larger, so 
this may be completed as soon as possible. There have been 
many small repairs made, too many to mention. This covers 
all the new work with the exception of some few hundred feet 
of gravel road which were done. 

Oiling Streets 

During the summer there was spent oiling streets, outside of 
blanketing with Tarvia, which was charged to Maintenance, 
$1840.65, and $1853.23 was collected by Tax Collector and 
turned over to us with our highway appropriation. 

30 



Sidewalks 

New walks were built on Main Street from School to Phillips, 
Central, Brook and Summer Streets, and a few small jobs. 
Resurfacing was done on Central Street, Barnard and Essex 
Streets. For this work, you should have more money, as $1500 
is not nearly enough to make the necessary walks needed and 
repair walks already in. More walks should be built as a great 
many of the streets are mud in the fall and early spring. 

Ballardvale 

Work done by Mr. John Haggerty in Ballardvale District 
during 1916 consisted of draging all the streets throughout the 
center, also scraping off all roads leading to Ballardvale; repairing 
sidewalks, curbing on Center Street, repairs on Andover Street, 
Chester Street, cleaning gutters, catchbasins, and repairing with 
gravel wherever necessary; also snowplough work and sanding. 
This section is in very good repair, and during the coming year 
more curbing should be put in and sidewalks repaired, especially 
on the Hill. During the past year there was spent in this section 
under the supervision of Mr. Haggerty $2008.64, covering all 
work done by him and Fire Department horses. 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

Nothing but the building of a wall in the park, and the addition 
of the Boulders to the Park System has been done during the 
past year. The Boulders were not turned over to me for care 
until very late, so they were not kept in first-class shape, but 
during 1917 it will be looked after every week by the Park 
employee. 

Appropriation of Park Department for 1916 $1500 00 

Bills and payrolls 1481 76 

Balance 18 24 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation, March 6, 1916 
Highway Department 
Railway Franchise Tax 
Railway Excise Tax 
Sprinkling 

Massachusetts Highway Commission 
County 

Special Lowell Street 
Credits (various accounts) 
Lowell Street transfer 



$28300 00 
1420 46 
2174 30 
1853 23 
2266 66 
2295 04 
2323 60 
1695 37 
2500 00 





$44828 67 


snditures 




Maintenance 


$14531 61 


Construction 


15548 79 


Lowell Street 


6885 31 


Snow 


3995 10 


Drain 


2551 36 


Sidewalks 


1311 31 


- 


$44823 48 


Balance 


5 19 



S44828 67 $44828 67 



Main Street 
Appropriation 

Main Street Sidewalk Curbing 
Credits from M.J. Curran 



Expenditures 

On Sidewalks, W. F. Duffee & Co. 
On Curbing, W. F. Duffee & Co. 
Balance on appropriation 





$2000 00 

2883 80 


$2883 80 

1482 75 

517 25 


$4883 80 



$4883 80 $4883 80 
FRANK L. COLE 

Superintendent 



35 



REPORT OF 

TOWN BUILDING LAWS 
COMMITTEE 



BUILDING LAWS 



Title 

Section 1. This By-Law shall be known and cited as the Building 
Law. 

Inspector of Buildings 

Section 2. The Board of Selectmen shall, within thirty days 
after the adoption of this By-Law and thereafter annually in April, 
appoint an Inspector of Buildings, who shall hold office for the term 
of one year or until such time as his successor is appointed. 

His compensation shall be regulated by the Selectmen unless 
determined by a vote of the town at the annual March meeting 
preceding his appointment. 

He shall not be interested in any contract or in the furnishing of 
materials for any building. 

The Board of Selectmen shall have power to discharge the Inspector 
for failure to perform his duties, and to fill any vacancy in the office. 

Section 3. The Inspector of Buildings may, so far as is necessary 
for the performance of his duties, enter any building or premises 
within the town at any reasonable hour. 

Section 4. He shall keep a record of all business of the depart- 
ment, which record and all other books and papers relating to the 
transactions of the department shall be open at all times to the in- 
spection of the Selectmen, and he shall submit to them a yearly 
report on such business and such other reports as they may require. 

Buildings Affected 

Section 5. No building shall be constructed or altered except 
in conformity with the provisions of this by-law, but nothing in this 
by-law shall be construed to apply to: — 

(a) Bridges, quays, wharves or buildings or land owned or 
occupied by the United States or the Commonwealth. 

(b) Small wooden buildings not to be used for habitable purposes, 
and not more than eight feet in length or breadth and seven feet in 
height. 

Application 

Section 6. A person intending to erect or make alterations 
in such building, or his duly authorized agent shall, seven days 
at least before he proceeds to build or erect the same, or lay the 
foundation thereof, or to make the said alterations, or to do any act 
for carrying into execution his intention to do such things, file with 
the Inspector of Buildings on blank forms furnished by the said 
official, a notice in writing of his intention, with plans and specifica- 
tions, or a full written description of the structure to be erected, in 
such form as may be approved by the Inspector. The Inspector may 
also require, in his discretion, a survey of a lot on which any proposed 



building is to be erected to be filed with the application. Every 
application shall state the name and address of the owner. Dupli- 
cates of all plans and specifications or written descriptions, when 
approved by the Inspector, shall be kept at the building during the 
progress of the work, and shall be open to his inspection. 

Granting of Permits 

Section 7. The Inspector shall not give a permit for the erection 
or alteration of any building until he shall have carefully inspected the 
plans, specifications and premises, and ascertained that the building as 
proposed will conform to this by-law. He shall grant permits for 
such erection, or alteration, when the plans and detailed descriptions 
are in conformity with this by-law and the laws of the Common- 
wealth. It shall be his duty to approve or reject any plans or descrip- 
tions filed with him, within ten days. No work shall be commenced 
until a permit is issued. He shall, as often as practicable, inspect all 
buildings in the course of construction or alteration, and shall make a 
record of all violations of these by-laws, with the name of the owner, 
occupant, architect and master-mechanic, and of any other matters 
pertinent thereto. If the Inspector finds that the terms of a permit are 
being violated, he may, after written notice to the person to whom the 
permit was issued, order the whole or any part of the work, which is 
being done under the permit, to be stopped, and such work shall not 
be resumed until the terms of the permit have been complied with. 

Any permit or approval which may be issued by the Inspector of 
Buildings, but under which no work has been done above the founda- 
tion walls within one year from the time of the issuance of the permit 
or approval, shall expire by limitation. Said Inspector shall have 
power to revoke or cancel any permit or approval in case of any 
failure or neglect to comply with any provision of this by-law, or in 
case any false statement or representation is made in any specifica- 
tions, plans or statements submitted or filed for such permit or 
approval. No building hereafter constructed or altered shall be 
occupied unless it conforms in its construction to the regulations of 
this by-law nor until the Inspector of Buildings has issued his certi- 
ficate to that effect. The Inspector of Buildings shall not issue such 
certificate until the Board of Health has certified to him that the 
building conforms to all the requirements of its plumbing regulations. 
The Inspector of Buildings shall issue or refuse in writing to issue 
his certificate within fifteen days after written application therefor. 

Unsafe Buildings 

Section 8. The Inspector of Buildings shall examine every building 
or other structure which he has reason to believe unsafe or dangerous, 
and if he finds it unsafe or dangerous he shall, in writing, notify the 
owner, agent or any person having an interest therein, to remove it 
or make it safe and secure, and such person shall thereupon immedi- 
ately remove it or make it safe, in such manner as the Inspector of 
Buildings shall approve. 



Appeal 

Section 9. In case the owner of any building or other structure, 
or an applicant for a permit to erect or alter a building or other 
structure, is aggrieved by any order or decision of the Inspector of 
Buildings, he may file with the Inspector an objection in writing, 
and thereupon the matter shall be referred to the Selectmen who, 
within one week from said reference, shall hear the parties, and after 
taking such expert opinion as may seem to the Selectmen to be 
necessary, give their decision. In case the decision of the Inspector 
of Buildings be affirmed, the expense of such expert opinion taken 
by the Selectmen shall be paid to the town by the owner or applicant 
on demand, otherwise such expense shall be borne by the town. 

Definitions 

Section 10. Adjoining Owners. The owner or one of the owners 
of the premises adjoining those under construction. 

Alteration. Any changes in or addition to a building. 

Areas. Open spaces adjacent to buildings or the building line for 
lighting or ventilation. 

Attic. (See Half Story). 

Basement. A lower story partly underground but which, in the 
average, is at least one half above the average level of the adjoining 
ground. But in a building which is not used for human habitation 
such lower story may be deemed a first story, if the upper part of its 
floor is not below the level of an adjoining street, way, place, or suit- 
able sized open area of vacant land and has proper means of ventila- 
tion and exit. All to the satisfaction of the Building Inspector. 

Bearing Wall. Any wall which carries any load other than its own 
weight. 

Builder. A person employed to build or to execute work on a 
building or where no person is so employed, the owner of the building. 

Building, Wooden. A building of which the external wall is 
constructed wholly or partly of wood. Wood frames covered with 
metal shall be deemed to be wood construction. 

Chimney. Any permanent or fixed flues or passages built into any 
building for conveying away products of combustion from furnaces, 
stoves, boilers, ranges, or fireplaces. 

Corner Lot. A lot situated at the intersection of two or more 
streets or at the junction of two streets or where a street changes its 
direction provided the interior angle does not exceed 120 degrees. 

Any portion of a corner lot distant more than seventy feet from 
either street line shall be treated as an interior lot. 

Courts. An open, unoccupied space other than a yard on the 
same lot with a dwelling. If it does not extend to the street or front 
or rear yard it is an inner court. If it does so extend it is an outer 
court. 

Thickness of a Wall. The minimum thickness of such wall. 



Curb Level. The level of an established curb in the front of the 
building at the center of the front. Where no curb has been estab- 
lished, the town shall establish such curb level or its equivalent for 
the purposes of this by-law. 

Curtain Wall. A wall built between piers or iron, or steel columns 
and which is not a bearing wall. 

Dwelling-house. Any house or building or portion thereof which is 
occupied in whole or in part as the home, residence or sleeping-place 
of one or more human beings, either permanently or transiently. 

Private Dwelling-house. A house in which not more than two 
families dwell independently and in which no part is used for business 
purposes. 

External Wall. Every outer wall or vertical enclosure of a building 
other than a party wall. 

Flat Roof. A roof that pitches not more than four inches to the 
foot. 

Footing. That part of any masonry foundations resting directly 
on the ground. 

Foundation. That portion of a wall below the level of the street 
curb, or where the wall is not on a street below the level of the highest 
ground next to the wall, and shall include all piers below the curb 
level or below the floor of the first story. 

Front and Rear of Lots. That boundary line which borders on the 
street is the front of the lot. In case of a corner lot the owner may 
elect by statement on his plans either street boundary line as the 
front. 

The rear of the lot is the side opposite the front. In case of a 
triangular or gore lot the rear shall be the side not bordering on a 
street. 

The depth of a lot is the dimension measured from the front to the 
extreme rear line of the lot. In case of irregular shaped lots the mean 
depth shall be taken. 

Height of a Building. The vertical distance of the highest point 
of the roof above the mean grade of the curbs of all the streets or the 
mean grade of the natural ground adjoining the building if the said 
grade of the ground is not below the grade of the curb. 

Height of a Wall. The vertical distance from the mean grade of 
the ground adjoining the wall to the highest point of the wall. 

Interior Lot. Any other lot than a corner lot. 

Lodging-house. A house or building or part thereof in which six 
or more persons are harbored, received, or lodged for hire, or any 
building or part thereof which is used as a sleeping-place or lodging 
for six or more persons not members of the family residing therein. 

Length and Width of Building. The greatest linear dimension of 
any building is its length and the next greatest linear dimension its 
width. 

Mansard Roof. A roof formed with an upper and under set of raf- 
ters, the upper more inclined to the horizon than the lower. 



Occupied Space. Outside stairways, fire escapes, porches, plat- 
forms, and other projections shall be considered as part of the build- 
ing and not as part of the yards or courts or unoccupied spaces. 

Owner. Includes any part owner, joint owner, tenant in common 
or joint tenant of the whole or part of any building or land. 

Partition Wall. Any interior wall of a building. 

Party Wall. A wall that separates two or more buildings and is 
used or adapted for use of more than one building. 

Repairs. The reconstruction or renewal of any existing part of a 
building or of its fixtures or appurtenances by which the strength or 
fire risk is not affected or modified and not made for the purpose of 
converting the building in whole or in part to a new use. 

Shaft. Includes exterior and interior shafts whether for air, light, 
elevator, dumbwaiter, or any other purpose. 

Skylight. Any structure on or opening on a roof for the admission 
of light. 

Span or Beam. The distance from center to center of its supports. 

Stair Hall. Includes the stair, stair landings and those portions 
of the public halls through which it is necessary to pass in going 
between the entrance floor and the roof. 

Story of a Building. That part of a building between the top of any 
floor beams and the top or roof beams next above. 

Story, First. The story, the floor of which is first above the base- 
ment or cellar. 

Story, Second. The story next above the first story. 

Story, Half. Is a story in a sloping roof. 

Story, Topmost. The uppermost story, whether constructed wholly 
or partly in the roof or not. 

Tenement House. A house or building or part thereof which is 
rented, leased, let, or hired out to be occupied or is occupied or is 
intended, arranged, or designed to be occupied as the home or resi- 
dence of two or more families, which families may consist of one or 
more persons living independently of each other and having a common 
right in the halls, stairways, yard, courts, cellar, sinks, water-closets, 
or privies or any of them. Where the occupants of dwelling-houses 
contiguous, and vertically, divided, each occupied and intended, 
arranged or designed to be occupied as the home or residence of one 
family or more have a common right in or use in common the halls 
stairways, yards, cellars, sinks, water-closets, or privies or any of 
them, such dwellings are tenement houses. 

Street. Any public way not less than sixteen feet in width. 

Yard. An open unoccupied space on the same lot with a building 
between the extreme rear line of the house and the extreme rear line 
of the lot. 

A front yard is an open unoccupied space between the front line of 
the building and the front line of the lot. 



A side yard is an open unoccupied space between the side line of 
the building and the side line of the lot and shall be deemed an outer 
court on the lot line. 

Words used in the present tense shall include the future; in the 
masculine, the feminine and neuter; in the singular, the plural, and in 
the plural, the singular; "shall" is always mandatory and not direc- 
tory; occupied or used shall be construed as if followed by the words 
or intended, arranged, designed, built, altered, converted to, rented, 
leased, let, hired, out, "to be used or occupied". When any word 
designating any building premises or lot is used, it shall be construed 
as if followed by the words "or any part thereof". 

The provision of these by-laws shall be held to be the minimum 
requirements for the protection of the health, welfare, and safety of 
the community. 

Percentage of Lot Occupied 

Section 11. No dwelling-house hereafter erected shall occupy 
either alone or with other buildings more than sixty-five per cent of a 
corner lot nor more than fifty per cent of any other lot; the measure- 
ments to be taken at the ground level. Xo measurements of lot area 
shall include any part of any street or alley 

Height of Building 

Section 12. Xo dwelling-house hereafter erected shall exceed in 
height the width of the widest street upon which it stands, unless 
such house be set back from the street a distance at least equal to the 
excess of such height over the width of such street but in no event 
shall a wooden building hereafter erected to be used for a tenement 
house exceed forty-five feet in height nor have more than two 
stories below the attic floor, and every building hereafter enlarged or 
altered for use as dwelling-house shall be made to conform to the 
requirements of this section. In no wooden tenement house hereafter 
erected shall any story or any part thereof above the second story be 
occupied or arranged for housekeeping independently of the lower 
stories nor shall any provision be made for cooking nor shall any 
cooking be done above the second story. 

Lots 

Section 13. No portion of a building hereafter erected or altered 
for use as a dwelling-house shall be placed nearer the rear lot line 
than a distance equal to one-half its height; but in no event shall 
such distance be less than ten feet. 

Proximity to other Buildings 

Section 14. Xo portion of any wooden dwelling-house hereafter 
erected shall be placed at less distance than ten feet from the side 
line of the lot upon which it is to be located or within ten feet of 
another wooden building except where a brick external wall of a 
thickness and built in the manner prescribed for external walls of 
brick buildings is substituted for a wooden wall. 



Basement and Cellar Rooms 

Section 15. In tenement houses hereafter erected no room in 
the basement or cellar shall be constructed, altered, converted or 
occupied for living purposes. 

Cellars, Damp-proofing and Lighting of 

Section 16. Every tenement house hereafter erected shall have 
the walls below the ground level, and the cellar floor damp-proof. 
All cellars and basements in such tenement houses shall be properly 
lighted and ventilated and kept free from dampness in all their parts 
to the satisfaction of the Board of Health. 

Spaces under Floors 

Section 17. In any dwelling-house hereafter erected, under any 
part of which there is no cellar, the first or ground floor shall be at 
least two feet above the ground beneath and that adjacent thereto, 
and the space beneath such floor shall be kept free and clear, and shall 
be inclosed to prevent the accumulation of rubbish, but provided with 
ample ventilation and adequate drainage. 

Foundations 

Section 18. Excavations for stone foundations shall be made at 
least six inches beyond the outside of foundation walls and shall 
not be back-filled until inspected. The foundations of all buildings 
for dwellings, except as provided in Section 19, shall be walls of 
masonry at least sixteen inches thick and piers of masonry or iron, 
laid in cement mortar; but cellar walls may be laid dry to within 
six inches of the finished grade, provided they are properly pointed 
inside with cement and lime mortar. All wooden buildings not 
more than two stories in height, may be built wholly or in part 
upon piers or posts. The foundations of all buildings must rest 
on solid ground or leveled surafces of solid rock, or on piles, concrete, 
or other solid substance. Such foundation, other than solid rock, 
must not be exposed less than three feet below the adjacent surface 
of the ground exposed to frost. Piazzas and porches shall have a 
suitable foundation of stone, brick, iron or concrete, built on solid 
bottom, not less than three feet below, and extending not less than 
three inches above the finished grade. All foundations under masonry 
walls and piers shall be at least four inches wider than the finished 
wall or pier. 

Concrete Specifications 

Section 19. Cellar and house walls of concrete shall be poured 
with forms upon both sides and shall be well rammed to place. For 
houses two stories or more in height the thickness of the cellar walls 
shall be at least twelve inches, and for one-story houses the thickness 
shall be at least eight inches. The proportions of the mixture shall 
be in volume as follows: — 

8 



One part of Atlas Portland Cement or a brand of equal grade; 
two parts of clean, sharp sand; five parts of broken stone or well- 
screened gravel. 

No concrete or other mason work shall be erected when the tem- 
perature is below freezing. 

Fire Walls 

Section 20. No building, to be used as a dwelling, shall here- 
after be erected, and no existing building shall be altered or added 
to for such purpose, thereby giving it a frontage of more than fifty 
feet, without one or more partition walls of brick or some fire-resisting 
material, approved by the Inspector, extending from the bottom of 
the cellar or from a foundation wall to the under side of the roof- 
boarding, which shall be laid and be imbedded in mortar upon said 
w r all. Such walls shall not be more than fifty feet apart throughout 
the length of the building. No existing building having a frontage 
of more than fifty feet shall be converted for use as a dwelling-house, 
without at least one partition wall, constructed as described in this 
section. Provided, however, that any single dwelling-house used 
for one family may be extended more than fifty feet in one direction 
without such partition wall. 

Apartment House Fire Walls 

Section 21. All houses arranged for the occupancy side by side 
of more than two families shall have a fireproof partition wall be- 
tween each apartment, consisting either of a brick wall, not less than 
eight inches thick, extending from the cellar bottom to the under side 
of the roof-boarding, or of a brick or concrete wall not less than 
eight inches thick, extending from the cellar bottom to the top side of 
the first floor timbers, and above that to the under side of the roof- 
boarding, of two by four-inch studding, with the spaces betw r een 
filled solid with bricks and mortar, or other fireproof material, not 
less than four inches thick, to make a smoke-tight barrier between 
the apartments. 

Wooden Frame Buildings 

Section 22. All wooden frame buildings shall be built with sills, 
posts, girts and plates, girts to be tenoned into the posts. All build- 
ings shall be braced in each story and in cross-partitions if deemed 
necessary by the Inspector. No wall or ceiling of any building shall 
be lathed or otherwise covered until the Inspector has been notified 
in wTiting that the building is ready for such work, and until he has 
given written consent therefor. The Inspector shall act on such 
notice within forty-eight hours of its receipt. 

In all wooden buildings not exceeding three stories in height the 
posts of which exceed twenty-two feet in length, the sills shall be not 
less than six by six inches, and the posts and girts not less than 
four by six inches; in all such buildings the posts of which are tw r enty- 
two feet or less in length, the sills shall be not less than four by six 
inches, laid flatwise, and the posts and girts not less than four by six 
inches; in all wooden buildings the studding of the outside walls 



shall not be less than two by four inches, set not more than sixteen 
inches on centres; in all wooden buildings the studding in all parti- 
tions carrying floor timbers shall not be less than two by four inches, 
set not more than sixteen inches on centres, and resting on girders 
not less than six by eight inches. All window studding to be not less 
than three by four inches. Ledger boards may be used in place of 
girts in one and one-half story houses or in dwellings where the attic 
floor is below the plates, if the spaces back of the ledger boards 
between studding shall be filled with joists of same size as wall-studs, 
cut in tight so as to prevent a draft in case of fire. All self-supporting 
walls or partitions above the first floor in any building shall be 
trussed in a manner approved by the Inspector. 

Floor Timbers 

Section 23. Floor timbers in dwelling-houses, when of good, 
sound spruce set sixteen inches on centres, shall be of the following 
sizes : — for a span not exceeding ten feet the timbers shall be not 
less than two by seven inches; for a span not exceeding thirteen feet 
the timbers shall be not less than two by eight inches; for a span not 
exceeding fifteen feet the timbers shall be not less than two by nine 
inches; for a span not exceeding seventeen feet the timbers shall be 
not less than two by ten inches; for a span not exceeding eighteen 
feet the timbers shall be not less than two by twelve inches; for a span 
not exceeding twenty feet the timbers shall be not less than two by 
fourteen inches; for a span not exceeding twenty-two feet the timbers 
shall be not less than three by twelve inches; for a span not exceeding 
twenty-four feet the timbers shall be not less than three by fourteen 
inches in size. In case other sizes, materials, and spacings are used 
for floor supports, the arrangements must be such as to secure a 
strength equivalent to that given above in the specifications for 
spruce. All floor timbers of eight feet or more span shall be bridged 
at intervals not greater than six feet apart with bridging at least 
one by two inches in size. 

Girders when of good, sound spruce shall be not less than six by 
eight inches under main partitions. Summers or floor timbers 
doubled, or their equivalent shall be used under all cross partitions 
in the first floor of all dwellings. Headers and trimmers of all open- 
ings more than four feet square in the floors of dwellings shall be 
floor joints doubled or their equivalent. Beams under carrying 
partitions in the first floors shall be supported on piers or cement filled 
iron posts, the latter not less than three and one-half inches in 
diameter, or their equivalent, the same to be spaced not more than 
eight feet apart on centres. In case structural steel or hard pine 
beams are used the spacing of the posts shall be such as to give a 
supporting strength equivalent to the above specifications for spruce. 
Floor timbers for any attic whether finished or unfinished, to which 
there is access by stairs shall not be less than two by seven inches. 

All cutting of floor timbers for the passage of pipes shall be on their 
upper edges, and no cut shall exceed two inches in depth, or be made 
more than three feet from the bearing point of the timber unless the 

10 



consent of the Inspector has first been obtained. Xo cutting in the 
under side of a floor timber will be allowed for any reason. 

Roof Timbers 

Section 24. In buildings which are eighteen feet or more in 
width, rafters for pitched roofs shall measure not less than, two by 
six inches., and be spaced not more than twenty inches on centres; 
in buildings which are less than eighteen feet in width, the size of 
rafters may be determined by the Inspector. Valley rafters twelve 
feet or more in length shall not be less than two by eight inches. All 
timbers herein mentioned are to be solid sticks excepting the plates, 
which may be in two pieces, each two by four inches, thoroughly 
spiked together. Flat roofs shall be timbered the same as floors. 

Brick Buildings, Bond 

Section 25. All brick walls shall be built with proper bond and 
all intersections of walls shall be thoroughly bonded together with 
brick or tied together with wrought iron straps as often as every 
eight feet in height. Floor beams shall be anchored to brick walls on 
which they rest and to each other so as to form continuous ties across 
the building at least every ten feet. 

Brick Dwelling-houses, Thickness of Walls 

Section 26. External walls of brick dwelling-houses, if not more 
than twelve feet in height, above the foundation walls, shall be not 
less than eight inches thick for their entire height; if two stories and 
not more than twenty-five feet in height, they shall not be less than 
twelve inches thick to the top of the second floor, and not less than 
eight inches thick for the remaining height: and if three stories and 
more than twenty-five feet in height, they shall be not less than 
twelve inches thick to the top of the third floor, and not less than 
eight inches thick for the remaining height. 

External Walls, Brick Buildings other than 
Dwelling-houses 

Section 27. The external walls of all brick buildings, other than 
dwelling-houses, if not more than forty feet in height, above the 
foundation walls, shall be of the following thickness. Walls for the 
two topmost stories shall be at least twelve inches in thickness; for 
the next two stories, reckoning downward, at least sixteen inches 
in thickness, and for all subsequent stories an increase of four inches 
in thickness shall be secured for each twenty-five feet in height. 
Provided, however, that the method known as "Mill Construction" 
may be used, whereby the external walls are constructed of a series 
of piers, of such width as the Inspector may approve, and of the 
thickness above prescribed for the external wall. Said piers to be 
connected by curtain walls. Said curtain walls shall be well bonded 
to the piers, and not less than eight inches thick, in which all windows 

11 



or other openings must be made. All floors must be supported on 
the piers and no portion of a floor shall for any reason be supported 
on curtain walls. 

The external walls of brick buildings, not exceeding twenty-five 
feet in height and covering an area not exceeding two thousand square 
feet, to be used for stables or light mechanical purposes, may be 
twelve inches thick. 

Party Walls of Brick Buildings other than 
Dwelling-houses 

Section 28. Party walls and all partition walls of brick, in all 
buildings other than dwelling-houses with external walls not exceeding 
forty feet in height, shall be not less than sixteen inches to the top 
of the second floor, and not less than twelve inches thick for the 
remaining height, and, in buildings having external walls exceeding 
forty feet in height, said walls shall be not less than twenty inches 
thick to the top of the second floor, nor less than sixteen inches thick 
to the top of the third floor, and not less than twelve inches thick 
for the remaining height. 

Doorways 

Section 29. No opening or doorway shall be cut through or 
formed in a party partition wall of any building without a permit 
from the Inspector of Buildings, and every such doorway shall have 
its top, bottom and sides of stone, brick or iron, and shall be closed 
by two doors of wood, covered with metal, with an air-space between 
them of at least four inches, and said doors shall be hung to slide or 
swing in wooden frames entirely covered with metal, or to iron 
hinges or track in brick or stone rabbets. 

Piers and Columns 

Section 30. All brick piers shall be built of the best quality of 
good, well-burnt, hard brick, laid in cement and sand mortar and 
well wet when laid in warm weather. Brick piers under lintels, 
girders or columns of brick buildings shall have a properly pro- 
portioned cap of castiron or steel the full size of the pier. Brick 
piers and buttresses shall be bonded with through courses, leveled 
and bedded each course, and where their foundations rest upon piles 
a sufficient number shall be driven to insure a proper support. 

Chimneys 

Section 81. All chimneys hereafter erected shall be built from 
the ground of brick, stone or other fireproof, non-heat-conducting 
materials, and shall be built plumb, or nearly so, so as to be self- 
sustaining; provided, however, that brick flues may be securely 
built into the brickwork of the walls of the building to which they 
are hung, when the walls are not less than twelve inches thick; and 
provided also, that upon special permission, first obtained from the 
Inspector, other forms of support may be used with such special 
safeguard as he may require, and provided also that, the matter of 

12 



chimneys in small wooden buildings, other than dwelling-houses, 
not more than one story and one-half in height, shall be left to the 
decision of the Inspector of Buildings, but must be constructed in 
accordance with his instructions and to his satisfaction. 

Chimney Linings 

Section 32. All brick chimneys shall be built of hard burned 
brick* plastered outside below the roofing after having been examined 
and approved by the Inspector of Buildings, except that exposed 
portions of said chimneys may be left unplastered upon the outside. 
Said chimneys shall be topped out with brick or stone, laid in cement, 
and the topping out shall not have more than two inches projection 
unless the bricks are covered by a cap of stone or other non- 
combustible material, in one piece, properly secured and approved by 
the Inspector; and in no case shall a nail be driven into the masonry 
of any flue. All chimneys with exterior walls less than eight inches 
thick shall be lined with vitrified clay flue-lining. 

Chimneys. Smoke-pipes 

Section 33. No smoke-pipe in any building with wooden or 
combustible floors or ceilings shall hereafter enter any flue except 
at a distance not less than twelve inches from said floor or ceiling; 
and in all cases where smoke-pipes pass through stud or wooden 
partitions of any kind, whether the same be plastered or not, they 
shall be guarded by a soapstone ring having a thickness radial to 
said pipe of not less than two inches and extending through said 
partition, and in cases where smoke-pipes pass through woodwork of 
any kind in such near proximity to the brickwork of the flue that 
the space between said woodwork and flue is inaccessible, said pipe 
shall be guarded by a soapstone ring or thimble, or its equivalent, 
having a thickness of at least two inches, and extending from the 
outer face of said woodwork to a point at least two inches within 
the brickwork of the flue, in which it shall be firmly set. The Inspector 
of Buildings may, however, allow the use of an approved substitute 
for such soapstone ring. 

Chimneys, Hearths 

Section 34. All hearths shall be supported upon the trimmer 
arches of brick or stone, or upon bars of iron supporting a bed of 
brickwork and shall be at least twelve inches longer than the width 
of the fireplace openings and at least eighteen inches wide in front 
of the chimney breast. Wooden centering supporting a trimmer 
arch shall be removed before plastering. 

Fireplaces 

Section 35. Brickwork of all grates, fireplaces and ranges shall 
not be less than eight inches thick. No woodwork shall be secured to 
brickwork of any flue. Open fireplaces shall have fireproof foun- 
dations. Where there is woodwork directly back of a fireplace, the 

13 



backs shall have either a two-inch air-space with four inches of brick 
or concrete blocks, or shall be at least eight inches thick with a 
fireplace lining of castiron or four inches of brick. Between fire- 
places or where back of fireplace is exposed there shall be not less 
than eight inches of masonry. 

FlREPROOFING DETAILS 

Section 36. a. All elevator wells, clothes chutes, and light shafts, 
unless built of brick, shall be filled in flush between the wooden studs 
with fireproof materials, or lined with metal or plastered on metal 
lathing, as may be directed by the Inspector, and all woodwork inside 
of such wells or shafts shall be lined with tin plate lock-jointed. 

b. Where floor beams rest on partition caps or on girders, wall 
girts or wooden sills shall be filled in between such beams, from 
the caps, girders, girts or sills to four inches above lining floor above, 
solid, with brick and mortar or other fireproof material. 

c. In brick buildings the space between the furring on the outside 
walls, or brick partitions, shall be filled flush with mortar for a space 
of five inches in width above and below the floor beams of each story. 

d. Where basement or other flights of stairs are enclosed by 
partitions of brick or wood, the space between the studs or wall 
furring shall be so fire-stopped with brick or mortar as to effectually 
prevent any fire from passing up between such studs or furring back 
of the stairs stringers. 

e. All flights of stairs between two floors shall have a smoke- 
stop built between the stringers and properly constructed. 

/. A space of at least one inch shall be left between all woodwork 
and the chimneys, also around all hot-air and steam pipes; these 
spaces around chimneys and pipes where they pass through the 
floors shall be stopped with metal or other fireproof material, smoke 
tight. Steam pipes shall have metal sleeves and collars one-half 
inch larger in diameter than the pipe. 

g. All channels and pockets for gas, water and soil pipes shall be 
made smoke-tight at each floor. 

h. The space around all metal or brick ventilating ducts shall be 
fire-stopped at each floor with a metal or fireproof material as ap- 
proved by the Inspector. 

i. Where a building is occupied above the first floor for tenements 
or a lodging-house, and the lower story is occupied for stores and other 
purposes not connected with the upper floors, the stairways leading 
to such upper floors shall be enclosed with brick walls or wooden 
partitions; said partitions shall be covered with metallic lath and 
plaster or other fireproof material. 

Electric Wiring 

Section 37. All electric wiring hereafter installed, or renewing 
hereafter done, and all repairs hereafter made to the extent of such 
repairs shall conform to the specifications now accepted by the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters and shall be subject to the 
approval of the Inspector of Buildings. 

14 



Heating 

Section 38. a. An apparatus for heating shall be so installed as not 
to be dangerous. Any woodwork, Avooden lath partitions or ceilings 
within four feet of the sides or back of any furnace, boiler or other 
heating apparatus, or six feet from the front shall be covered with 
metal to a height of at least four feet above the floor. 

b. No furnace or range set in masonry shall hereafter be placed 
or its location changed in any building without a permit from the 
Inspector of Buildings, who shall prescribe such regulations for the 
setting thereof as in his judgment the public safety may require. 

c. The top of every heating furnace or steam boiler or smoke pipe 
shall be kept at least one foot below the lowest part of the ceiling or 
floor next above it, and such protective covering shall be placed on 
such ceiling as the Inspector may require. No furnace or boiler shall 
be set upon a wooden floor, and no boiler shall be placed or maintained 
under any public way. 

d. All rooms containing a furnace or boiler or other heating appa- 
ratus having a grate area of more than ten square feet shall be sepa- 
rated from all parts of the building by masonry partitions at least eight 
inches thick and ceilings of metal lath and plaster. The openings in 
partitions shall be fitted with approved self-closing fire doors. 

e. No horizontal hot-air pipe leading from a furnace shall be less 
than six inches from any woodwork unless the woodwork be covered 
with loose-fitting tin or the pipe be covered with approved protective 
material. 

/. No pipes for conveying hot air shall be placed nearer than two 
inches to any woodwork unless protected to the satisfaction of the 
Inspector by suitable guards or casings of incombustible materials. 

g. No wooden flue or duct of any description shall be used for 
heating or ventilating purposes except that wooden air-ducts may be 
used to convey cold air to heating furnaces, all woodwork of the same 
to be at least three feet from the outside of the firebox of said furnace. 

h. Hot-air register boxes in the floors or partitions of all buildings 
shall be set in soapstone or equally fireproof borders not less than 
two inches in width, shall be made of tin plate, and shall have double 
pipes and boxes properly fitted to the stone borders. 

i. There shall be one register without valves or louvres in every 
furnace installation. 

j. No steam or hot-air pipe shall be placed within one inch of any 
woodwork, and no such pipe shall pass through any wood stud or 
sheathed partition unless protected by a suitable thimble approved 
by the Inspector of Building 

Light and Ventilation 

Section 39. In every tenement house, dwelling or place where 
people are employed, hereafter erected, every room shall have at 
least one window opening directly upon the street or upon the yard, 
or court, an outer or inner, except that kitchenettes, "pantries, water- 
closet compartments and bath-rooms may have such windows opening 
upon a light- well. AH windows shall be so located as to properly 

15 



light all parts of such rooms. No light-well shall be less than three 
feet in its least dimension nor less in area than twelve square feet for 
one story, and must be increased six square feet in area for each 
additional story, and the walls of such light-well shall be constructed 
of incombustible material. 

Shafts and Courts 

Section 40. In every tenement house hereafter erected there 
shall be. at the bottom of every shaft and court, a door giving sufficient 
access to such shaft or court to enable it to be properly cleaned. 

Windows in Room 

Section 41. In every tenement house hereafter erected the total 
window area in each room, including water-closet compartments and 
bath-rooms, shall be at least one-eighth of the floor area of the room. 
The above window measurements shall be taken between the stop- 
beads. 

Size of Rooms 

Section 42. In every tenement house hereafter erected there 
shall be in each apartment at least one room containing not less 
than one hundred and forty square feet of floor area. Each room 
shall be in every part not less than eight feet high from the finished 
floor to the finished ceiling, except that an attic room need be seven 
feet six inches high in but one-half of its floor area. 

Privacy 

Section 43. In every apartment in any tenement house hereafter 
erected, access to every living-room and bedroom and to at least 
one water-closet shall be hadwithout passing through any bedroom. 

Chimneys and Firepla' 

Section 44. In every tenement house hereafter erected, there 
shall be at least one adequate chimney running through every floor 
with an open fireplace or grate or place for a stove, properly comiected 
with said chimney, for every apartment. 

Public Halls 

Section 45. In every tenement house hereafter erected, every 
public hall shall have at least one window, of the dimensions specified 
for rooms in this by-law. at each story, opening directly upon the 
street or upon a yard. Any part of a public hall which is shut off from 
any other part of said hall by a door shall be deemed a separate hall 
within the meaning of this section. 

Stairway^ 

^-< tion 46. Every tenement house hereafter erected shall have 
two separate stairways leading from each apartment to the ground, 
access to these stairways being at two points as far apart as possible. 

16 



Repaperixg 

Section 47. Xo wallpaper or kalsomine or other wash shall be 
placed upon any wall or ceiling or other portion of any tenement 
house unless all old paper, kalsomine or wash shall first be removed 
therefrom and said wall or other portion of building thoroughly 
cleaned. 

Access to Flat Roofs 

Section 48. Every building over two stories high and having a 
flat roof shall have permanent access to the roof, from the inside of 
the building, through an opening at least two feet by three feet, 
with fixed step-ladder or stair. Such opening shall have direct 
access from a public corridor or a stair hall and shall not be equipped 
with a lock. 

Roof Houses 

Section 49. No roof houses shall be constructed on any building 
above the highest level permitted for the roof, except over stairs, 
tanks, elevators and elevator machinery, and such houses shall be 
no larger than is necessary to serve properly their purpose, and as 
approved. 

Parapets 

Section 50. No part of any parapet on a roof shall be more than 
six feet above the highest level permitted for the roof. 

Skylight 

Section 51. All skylights on roofs of buildings shall be metal 
and glass, and shall not be at any point higher than six feet above 
the highest level permitted for the roof except with special approval. 
Skylights not glazed with wire glass shall be protected with wire 
screens when required by the Inspector of Buildings. 



Bays, Balconies, Porches, Cornices 
and Other Projections 

Section 52. No parts of a building other than those mentioned 
in this division, shall project over any street, square or other public 
way. 

Cornices may project a distance equal to one-twentieth of the 
width of the public way; provided, however, that in no case shall 
they in any part project more than three feet. 

Window caps and sills, string courses and other projections may 
project one quarter of the projection allowed for a cornice of the 
wall on which they occur. 

Rain-water leaders and conductors shall not project more than 
seven inches. 

Signs and marquises shall be allowed, if approved by the Board 
of Selectmen. 

17 



Roof Water 

Section 53. No roof shall be so arranged as to discharge water, 
ice or snow upon a public way or adjoining property. 

Exceptions 

Section 54. Temporary buildings may be erected for the use of 
builders within the limits of the lots whereon buildings are in course 
of erection, or on adjoining vacant lots, and other temporary struc- 
tures including platforms, stands, election booths, and tents may be 
erected upon permits issued by the Inspector and may be maintained 
for the period of time stated in the permit. No observation stand 
shall be constructed or maintained except in accordance with plans 
approved by the Inspector. 

Billboards 

Section 55. No billboards or signboards shall be erected or 
placed upon any building or structure or the roof thereof or upon 
the ground, unless the same be safely supported and securely 
fastened thereto in a manner satisfactory to the Building In- 
spector. 

Icehouses 

Section 56. Buildings to be used exclusively for the storage of 
ice may be erected in isolated localities and constructed of such 
materials and under such conditions as the Inspector may prescribe. 

Fire Limits 

Section 57. Fire limits are established as follows : 
Beginning at a point on the westerly side of Main Street on the 
southerly side of Stimson's Bridge, and running thence westerly 
along the southerly side of the Shawsheen River to a point 150 feet 
westerly from the westerly side of Main Street, thence southerly 
on a line parallel with and distant 150 feet westerly from the westerly 
side of Main Street to a point 150 feet from Stevens Street, thence 
westerly and southwesterly on a line parallel with and distant 150 
feet northerly from the northerly line of Stevens Street, to land of 
Abbie Smith; thence southerly by the easterly boundary line of said 
Smith's land to Stevens Street, thence westerly by Stevens Street, 
to its intersection with Shawsheen Road; thence southeasterly by 
Shawsheen Road to a point 400 feet northwesterly from the northerly 
side of Cuba Street, thence southwesterly at a right angle with Shaw- 
sheen Road 100 feet, to a point; thence southeasterly on a line 
parallel with, and distant 100 feet from the southerly side of Shaw- 
sheen Road to a point 150 feet from Cuba Street, thence southwesterly 
and southerly on a line parallel with, and distant 150 feet westerly 
from the westerly side of Cuba Street to Red Spring Road, thence 
northeasterly by Red Spring Road to Essex Street, thence easterly 
by Essex Street to the east side of Shawsheen River; thence southerly 
along the easterly side of said river to a point distant 100 feet from 
Essex Street, thence easterly on a line parallel with, and distant 

18 



100 feet southerly from the southerly line of Essex Street to the base 
line of »the Boston & Maine Railroad, right of way; thence southerly 
by said base line to a point in the prolongation of the northerly side 
of School Street, thence southeasterly by School Street to Central 
Street, thence southerly by Central Street, to a point distant 150 
feet from School Street, thence southeasterly on a line parallel with 
and distant 150 feet westerly from the westerly side of School Street 
to Abbot Street, thence easterly by Abbot Street to School Street, 
thence southeasterly by School Street to Main Street, thence north- 
erly by Main Street to Wheeler Street, thence easterly by Wheeler 
Street to Bartlet Street, thence easterly on a line in the prolongation 
of the northerly side of Wheeler Street, to a point 150 feet distant 
from Bartlet Street, thence northerly on a line parallel with, and 
distant 150 feet easterly from the easterly line of Bartlet Street to 
the southerly line of land of the Town of Andover occupied by the 
Public Schools, thence westerly by the southerly line of said town's 
land to Bartlet Street, thence northerly by Bartlet Street to Whittier 
Street, thence easterly by the Southerly line of Whittier Street to 
an angle. Thence easterly on a line with the southerly line of Whit- 
tier Street, produced to a point distant 150 feet from Whittier Street, 
thence northerly on a line parallel with and distant 150 feet easterly 
from the easterly line of Whittier Street to Elm Street, thence westerly 
by Elm Street, to a point distant 150 feet from Wolcott Avenue, 
thence northerly on a line parallel with and distant 150 feet easterly 
from the easterly line of Wolcott Avenue to Walnut Avenue, thence 
by Walnut Avenue, to the dividing line between land of Parmenas 
W. Partridge and land formerly of John H. Flint, thence northerly 
and westerly following the easterly and northerly boundary line of 
said Flint's land to High Street, at a point adjoining Carmel Woods, 
thence southerly by High Street to Harding Street, thence westerly 
by Harding Street, to a point distant 200 feet from Main Street, 
thence northerly on a line parallel with, and distant 200 feet easterly 
from the easterly line of Main Street, to the Shawsheen River, 
thence westerly by the Shawsheen River to the point of beginning. 

Roofing Materials 

Section 58. The roof of every building hereafter erected or 
recovered in whole or in part within the fire limits herein established, 
and the top of every wood cornice, the top and sides of every dormer 
window and every other projection from such roof, shall be covered 
with fire-resisting material. 

Fire-resisting material specified above, shall include slate, tile, 
asbestos, cement, tar and gravel, plastic slate, copper, tin, heavy 
asphalt-felt shingles of which the exposed surface is composed of 
slate chips or gravel, and such other incombustible material as may 
be approved in writing by the Inspector of Buildings. 

This section shall apply to the roof of any tenement house hereafter 
erected or recovered in whole or in part wherever located. 

Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit the use of 
wood shingles in repairing any roof now covered with wood shingles, 

19 



provided that the area so repaired shall not exceed one quarter of 
the total shingled area of the roof and provided the building is not 
altered in height or otherwise generally reconstructed. 

Enforcement 

tion 59. The chief of police upon the application of the 
Building Inspector shall cause complaint to belnade before the proper 
court for any violation of any provision of this by law. 

The Board of Selectmen upon the application of the Inspector of 
Buildings may institute proceedings to enforce this by-law and 
to enjoin the erection, continuance or occupation of any building 
in violation of their provisions of this by-law. 

Penalty 

Section BO. Whoever violates any provision of this by-law shall 
be punished by a fine not exceeding one hundred dollars for each 
offense to be paid into the treasury of the town of Andover. 

When Takes Effect 

Section 61. This by-law shall go into effect the first day of 
April, A. D. 1917. 



20 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1917 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1918 



CONTENTS 



Almshouse Expenses 61 

Personal Property at 68 

Relief out of 68 

Repairs on 66 

Superintendent's Report 69 

Aiding Mothers 67 

Animal Inspector 84 

Appropriations. 1917 16 

Art Gallery 149 

Assessors' Report 71 

Assets 91 

Auditors' Report 100 

Board of Health 41, 72 

Board of Public Works Appendix 

Sewer Sinking Funds 52 

Water Sinking Funds 52 

Bonds, Redemption of 59 

Brush Fires 38 

Collector's Account 89 

Cornell Fund 99 

County Tax 53 

Dog Tax 53 

Dump, Care of 60 

Fire Department 36, 76 

Fire Alarm Box 38 

Finance Committee 101 

G. A. R. Post, 99 52 

Hay Scales 50 
High School Building Report 107 

Insurance 50 

Interest on Notes and Funds 56 



Liabilities 
Memorial Day 
Memorial Hall 
Librarian's Report 
Miscellaneous 



91 
51 

52, 128 

133 

61 



Moth Superintendent's Report 83 

Moth Suppression 44 

New High School 30 

Notes Given 54 

Notes Paid 55 

Overseers of the Poor 63 

Police 39, 78 

Printing and Stationery 43 
Punchard Free School, Report of 

Trustees 1 25 

Retirement of Veterans 60 

Schedule of Town Property 85 

Schools 23 

Selectmen's Report 23 

Soldiers' Relief 67 

Spring Grove Cemetery 48. 80 

State Aid 67 

State Tax 53 

Street Lighting 51 
Summary Collector's Cash Acct. 9o 

Town House 31 

Town Meeting 6 

Town Officers I, 32 

Town Warrant 121 

Treasurer's Account 91 

Tree Warden 17 

Report of 82 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1917 



Selectmen, Assessors and Overseers of the Poor 

HARRY M. EAMES, Chairman Term expires 1920 

CHARLES BOWMAN " " 1918 

WALTER S. DONALD, Secretary " " 1919 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
JOHN W. BELL 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 



School Committee 




EVERETT C. HILTON Term 


expires 1918 


HENRY A. BODWELL 


1918 


JOHN C. ANGUS 


1918 


MARY B. SMITH 


1919 


FREDERIC G. MOORE 


1919 


PHILIP F. RIPLEY 


1919 


ALFRED E. STEARNS 


1920 


GEORGE A. CHRISTIE 


"1920 


EDWARD C. CONROY 


1920 



Superintendent of Schools 
HENRY C. SANBORN 



Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
BARNETT ROGERS 
CHARLES B. BALDWIN 



Term expires 


1920 


a n 


1918 


<< ii 


1918 


a a 


1919 


a it 


1919 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 

FRANK L. COLE 

Engineers of Fire Department 
CHARLES S. BUCHAN, Chief WALTER I. MORSE. Clerk 

JOHN A. RILEY 

Board of Health 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY Term expires 1918 

CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. " ' 1919 

BANCROFT T. HAYNES " 1920 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Constables 

GEORGE W. MEARS Term expires 1918 

FRANK M. SMITH " " 1918 

THOMAS F. DAILEY " " 1918 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
GEORGE F. SMITH 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
BURTON S. FLAGG 
E. KENDALL JENKINS 
Rev. WILLIAM H. RYDER 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1919 
SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL HARRY H. NOYES 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY M. FAMES 

FRANK T. CARLTON 



jrm expires 


1921 


<< << 


1922 


n (< 


1923 


n n 


1924 


a 


1918 


(< «< 


1919 


14 It 


1920 



A uditors 
JOHN S. ROBERTSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

NESBIT G. GLEASON 

Trustees of Cornell Fund 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER Term expires 1918 

ALLAN SIMPSON " " 1919 

JOHN C. ANGUS " " 1920 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
JOHN H. PLAYDOX 

Tree Warden 
JOHN H. PLAYDOX 



Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 



Registrars of Voters 
CHARLES W. CLARK JOHN F. HURLEY 

PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 

Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 
FELIX G. HAYNES DANIEL H. POOR 

WALTER I. MORSE WARREN L. JOHNSON 

GEORGE D. MILLETT JOHN W. BELL 



* Deceased 



TOWN MEETING 



Annual Town Meeting March 5, 1917 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, SS. : To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the fifth day of March, 1917, at 
6 o'clock A.M., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, one member of the 
Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the Board 
of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for one 
year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Trustee of Memorial Hall 
Library for four years, one Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
two years, one Tree Warden for one year, one Trustee of Cornell 
Fund for three years, one Trustee of Spring Grove Cemetery for 
two years to fill vacancy, Fence Viewers, Pound Keeper, and any 
other officers the town may determine. 

Article 2. To take action on the following question, Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 
Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, 
Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall Li- 
brary, Memorial Day, Post 99, G.A.R., Miscellaneous, Parks and 



Playsteads, Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, Retirement 
of Veterans, Redemption of Water, Sewer, High School, and 
Andover Loan Act Bonds, Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer 
Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State 
Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, 
Moth Department.. Water Maintenance, Construction and Sink- 
ing Funds, and other town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $10,000 and authorize the High School Building Com- 
mittee to expend the same to build a passageway between the 
old and new Punchard buildings and to make further improve- 
ments on the old Punchard building and to provide additional 
equipment, upon recommendation of the High School Building 
Committee. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money not exceeding $5000.00 to continue the macadam on 
Lowell Street ; the same to equal an amount which the State and 
County will severally appropriate, together with the unexpended 
appropriation of 1916, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$3000 for additions to the filter beds as ordered by the State 
Board of Health, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 7. — To hear and act upon the report of the Committee 
on Building Laws and to pass any bylaws on that subject. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to establish a service for the removal of ashes 
and garbage from dwellings, stores, etc., in the central section of 
the town, partial payment for such service to be secured by a 
reasonable assessment upon owners of property benefited, and 
the balance to be paid by the town; and to appropriate $1500 
therefor. 

Article 9 — To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Public Works to construct a gate to close the underground 

8 



drain of the playstead during the winter months in order to form 
a skating-pond and appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars 
for the same, upon petition of W. E. Lombard and others. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000 for the purpose of installing an electric engine in the 
pumping station on Bancroft Road, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will appropriate a sum not 
exceeding $4000 for the purpose of building a concrete bridge 
across the Shawsheen River on Central Street, on petition of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 12 — To see if the town will vote to extend the Water 
System from its present terminal on Lowell Street a distance of 
5600 feet to Brown Street, then 3900 feet on Brown Street, on 
petition of Charles W. Livingston and others, and appropriate 
$11,500 for same. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will install water-pipes in 
Chandler Road from the hydrant now located in Chandler Road 
opposite the Kasabian Farm, in a general northwesterly direction 
along Chandler Road to the Railroad bridge, and also to instal I 
water-pipes from the junction of Beacon Street and Chandler 
Road in a general northeasterly direction to the Keating place, 
and to appropriate a sum of money therefor. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will vote to establish a fire 
alarm box on Main Street, at a point between the properties of 
the Tyer Rubber Company and Dionisio Michelini, or there- 
abouts, on petition of Dionisio Michelini and others, and appro- 
priate a sum of money therefor. 

Article 15. — To see if the town will vote to extend the sewer 
on Summer Street from Pine Street to a point 1400 feet distant, 
and appropriate the sum of $3000, the same to be expended under 
the direction of the Board of Public Works and to assess better- 
ments upon the estates benefited by the said extension, on 
petition of the Board of Health. 



Article 16 — To see if the town will vote to place an electric 
light on this side of the residence of David Cunningham on 
Shawsheen Road and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on 
petition of David Cunningham and others. 

Article 17. — To see if the town will vote to place an electric 
light in front of Indian Ridge School on Cuba Street and appro- 
priate a sum of money therefor, on petition of James A. Nolan 
and others. 

Article 18. — To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
vision of Section 37, Chapter 19, of the revised laws, in so far 
as it relates to the regular and permanent Police force of the 
Town cf Andover. 

Article 19. — To see if the town will vote to amend its bylaws 
by inserting under Article 4 thereof the following section to be 
numbered 12. 
(12) The selectmen may license suitable persons as junk 
collectors, to collect by purchase or otherwise, junk, 
old metals, and second-hand articles from place to 
place in the town of Andover. Said licenses shall be 
granted on or before the first day of May in each and 
every year. No license as a junk collector shall be 
issued to a person who is not a citizen of the United 
States. Licenses for the collection of junk may be 
issued as aforesaid to persons who do not reside 
within the Town of Andover, but the number of such 
non-resident licenses shall not exceed one to every two 
thousand of the population as ascertained by the next 
preceding official census. The fee for licenses for the 
collection of junk shall be as follows: — 

Resident collectors $ 5 . 00 

Non-resident collectors $25 . 00 

Article 20. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year. 

Article 21. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

10 



Article 22. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 23. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 24. — To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

Article 2.S. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 26. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock A.M., and may be closed 
at 2 o'clock. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting, as directed by the By-laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
■ doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, 
A.D. 1917. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



Andover, March 5, 1917 
Essex, SS. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said town to meet at the time and place and for 
the purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places, where bills and notices 
are usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 

11 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 5, 1917 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in Town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover on Monday the fifth day of March, 1917, at six 
o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the requirements of the fore- 
going warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and after 
reading a part of the warrant, it was 

Voted, To dispense with the further reading of the warrant. 

Voted, To Take up Articles 1 and 2 together. 

Voted, That the polls be closed at 2 o'clock p.m. 

Took up Articles 1 and 2 and proceeded to vote for Town Offi- 
cers and on the Liquor License question by the Australian ballot 
system. 

The Ballot box was found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at six o'clock a.m., and closed at 2 o'clock p.m., 
as voted. The total number of ballots cast was 820, forty-three 
(43) of which were female ballots for School Committee only. 

The result of the balloting was as follows: — 

Moderator — One year: 

Alfred L. Ripley 644 

Blanks 133 

Town Clerk — One year 

George A. Higgins 630 

Blanks 147 

Town Treasurer — One year: 

George A. Higgins 607 

Blanks 170 

12 



Selectman — Three years: 

Gordon R. Cannon 197 

Harry M. Eames 541 

Blanks 39 

Assessor — Three years : 

Gordon R. Cannon 200 

Harry M. Eames ' 527 

Blanks 50 

Collector of Taxes — One year: 

John W. Bell 621 

Blanks 156 

School Committee — Three years: 

George A. Christie 541 

Edward C. Conroy 446 

Mary W. French 427 

Alfred E. Stearns 591 

Blanks 455 

Board of Health — Three years 

Bancroft T. Haynes 556 

Blanks 221 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission — 



Three years 




Philip L. Hardy 


283 


Thomas E. Rhodes 


292 


William A. Trow 


165 


Blanks 


37 


Auditors of Accounts — One year: 




Walter H. Coleman 


560 


Nesbit G. Gleason 


587 


John S. Robertson 


636 


Blanks 


548 



13 



Constables — One year: 

Thomas F. Dailey 563 

George W. Mears 535 

Frank M. Smith 581 

Blanks 652 

Trustees of Memorial Hall Library — Four years: 

Nathan C. Hamblin 573 

Blanks 204 

Trustee Memorial Hall Library — Seven years: 

Burton S. Flagg 598 

Blanks 179 



Trustee Memorial Hall Library — Two years: 

William H. Ryder 572 

Blanks 205 

Tree Warden — One year : 

John H. Playdon 593 

Blanks 184 

Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in 
this town? 

Yes 221 

No 501 

Blanks 55 

All the foregoing officers and question were voted on by ballot 
and the check lists were used. 



REPORT OF PRECINCT CLERK 

Andover, Mass-., March 5, 1917 N 
Polls open at 6 a.m., Ballot box registered 0000. Ballot box 
registered when polls closed 819. Number of regular ballots re- 
ceived 1700, number of female ballots received 200. Number 
regular ballots returned 969. Number of female ballots returned 
157. Number of female ballots cast 43. Number of male ballots 
cast 777. Polls closed at 2 p.m. 

DANIEL A. COLLINS, 

Precinct Clerk 

14 



The Moderator declared — 

Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Treasurer for one year. 

Harry M. Eames elected Selectman for one year. 

Harry M. Eames elected Assessor for one year. 

John W. Bell elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 

George A. Christie elected School Committee for three years. 

Edward C. Conroy elected School Committee for three years. 

Alfred E. Stearns elected School Committee for three years. 

Thomas E. Rhodes elected Board of PublicWorks and Sinking 
Fund Commission for three years. 

Bancroft T. Haynes elected Board of Health for three years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Nesbit G. Gleason elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Thomas F. Dailey elected Constable for one year. 

George W. Mears elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

Burton S. Flagg elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
seven years. 

Nathan C. Hamblin elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for four years. 

William H. Ryder elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for two years. 

John H. Playdon elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund — John C. Angus for three years. 

Chose Trustee of Spring Grove Cemetery — Warren L. 
Johnson for two years. 

15 



Chose Fence Viewers for one year — James Saunders, Ray- 
mond L. Buchan, George \V. Mears. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee (appointed by the "Modera- 
tor) — Walter H. Coleman, Colver J. Stone, Edwin E. Perry. 
Henry J. Gardner. Jospeh L. Burns. 

Chose Finance Committee for one year (appointed by the 
Moderator) — George Abbot, Samuel H. Boutwell, John H. 
Campion, Walter M. Lamont. Chester W. Holland, Henry W. 
Barnard. 

Town Pound — Voted. That Town Barn and Barnyard be the 
Town Pound and that the Superintendent of the Town Farm be 
the keeper. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted — To appropriate the following stated sums of money: — 

Almshouse Expenses 

Almshouse repairs 

Relief out of Almshouse 

Aiding Mothers with Dependent children 

Board of Health 

Brush Fires 

Fire Department, running expenses and new hose. 

Hay Scales 

Highway Department, Sidewalks, Snow 

(Also St. Railway Tax and Street Sprinkling. 

$1500 to be spent under Betterment Act) 
Insurance 

Insurance (Workmen's Compensation) 
Interest 

Memorial Hall Library 
Memorial Day 
Post 99, G. A. R. 
Miscellaneous 
Parks and Playsteads 

Amount carried forward 

16 



S 4500 


00 


250 


00 


4300 


00 


500 


00 


2000 


00 


800 


00 


9200 


00 


125 


00 


.36500 


00 


1900 


00 


1600 


00 


17000 


00 


1800 


00 


350 


00 


100 


00 


2000 


00 


1500 


00 


SS4425 


00 



Amount brought forward 


$84425 00 


Police 


5000 00 


Printing and Stationery 


1200 00 


Public Dump 


75 00 


Retirement of Veterans, Acts 1912 


300 00 


Redemption of Water Bonds 


12949 22 


Redemption Punchard School Bonds 


2861 89 


Redemption Andover Loan Act Bonds 


5000 00 


Schools 


52500 00 


Sewer Department Maintenance 


2500 00 


Sewer Department Sinking Fund 


1000 00 


Soldier's Relief 


900 00 


Spring Grove Cemetery (and receipts from sale of lots) 


2500 00 


State Aid 


1300 00 


Street Lighting 


6500 00 


Town Officers 


6700 00 


Town House 


2000 00 


Tree Warden, Gypsy and Browntail Moth Dept. 


3500 00 


Water Department 




Maintenance 


11000 00 


Construction 


1500 00 


Sinking Fund 


750 00 


Lowell Street — Article 5 


2500 00 


Filter Beds — Article 6 


3000 00 


Gate for Playstead drain — Article 9 


100 00 


Pumping Plant — Article 10 


4000 00 


Fire Alarm Box — Article 14 


200 00 


Sewer — Summer Street — Article 15 


3000 00 


$217261 11 


Estimated State Tax 


23000 00 


Estimated County Tax 


16000 00 



$256261 11 
Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 4.12 p.m., That the town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $10,000. and authorize the High School Building Com- 



17 



mittee to expend the same to build a passageway between the 
old and new Punchard buildings and to make further improve- 
ments on the old Punchard building and to provide additional 
equipment. 

That for the purpose of building a passageway between the old 
and new Punchard Buildings and providing additional equip- 
ment: 

The Town Treasurer is hereby authorized to issue and sell 
bonds of the Town to an amount not exceeding $10,000., dated 
August 1st, 1917 and payable $1,000. thereof on the 1st of August 
in each of the years 1918-1927 inclusive, bearing interest at a rate 
of 4% per annum, payable semi-annually. The said bonds shall 
be denominated on their face Andover High School Loan 1917. 

The vote stood — Yeas 231, Nays, 5. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 4.18 p.m., That the town appropriate a sum of money 
not exceeding $2500, to continue the macadam on Lowell Street, 
the same to equal an amount which the State and County will 
severally appropriate, together with the unexpended appropria- 
tion of 1916. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 4.19 p.m., That the Town appropriate the sum of 
$3000, for additions to the filter beds as ordered by the State 
Board of Health. 

Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 4.22 p.m., To accept the report of the Committee on 
Building Laws and that the code of By-Laws as drafted by said 
Committee be adopted by the town. 

By unanimous consent of the meeting Hon. John N. Cole, 
presented the following resolutions, which were unanimously 
adopted : 

18 



"The citizens of Andover, assembled in Annual Town 
Meeting, in recognition of the result of long and honorable service 
in securing for the town one of its most important public bene- 
fits, the town w r ater supply, extend to John L. Smith and Felix 
G. Haynes, hearty felicitations upon their important part in the 
progress of the town for more than a quarter century, and their 
earnest wishes for the largest possible measure of comfort and 
cheer in their declining years." 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 4.36 p.m., That the question of the removal of ashes 
from dwellings, stores, etc. in the section of the town designated by 
the building laws as the Fire District be referred to the Board of 
Public Works for investigation, and the removal of garbage to 
the Board of Health, both of said Boards to report at the next 
annual Town Meeting. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 4.45 p.m., That the town authorize the Board of Pub- 
lic Works to Construct a gate to close the underground drain of the 
Playstead during the winter months in order to form a skating- 
pond and appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars for the 
same. 

Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 5.18 p.m., That the sum of $4,000. be appropriated 
for the use of the Board of Public Works to be used in construct- 
ing a two-unit auxiliary pumping plant within the Reservoir 
Circle in place of the present pumping station, and in extending 
an eight-inch water-main and gates necessary to connect with the 
present high pressure water-main, and that the Board of Public 
Works be authorized- to sell the present pump unit and building, 
the proceeds to be used by the Board in making said changes. 

19 



Took up Article 11. 

Voted, at 5.34 p.m.. That the Selectmen be instructed to pe- 
tition the County Commissioners to lay out Andover Street so- 
called from a point 200 feet west of Argilla Road to the B. & M. 
R. R. bridge, and Central Street so-called from this point to 
Railroad Street or Lupine Road, so-called, to alter, widen or re- 
locate said highway, or order specific repairs on the same includ- 
ing the bridge, or abutments of the bridge of the B. & M. R. R. 
also the bridge crossing the Shawsheen River, in accordance with 
the Revised Laws. Chapter 46. Sections 1 and 9. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, at 5.55 p.m.. To indefinitely postpone. 
Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 5.36 p.m.. To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 5.38 p.m.. To establish a fire alarm box on Main 
Street, at a point between the properties of the Tver Rubber 
Company and Dionisio Michelini. or thereabouts and to appro- 
priate the sum of S200 therefor. 

Took up Article 15. 

Voted, at 5.40 p.m.. That the town extend the sewer on Sum- 
mer Street from Pine Street to a point 1400 feet distant and ap- 
propriate the sum of S3000. the same to be expended under the 
direction of the Board of Public Works and to assess betterments 
upon the estates benefited by the said extension. 

Took up Article 16. 

Voted, at 5.41 p.m.. To refer to the Lighting Committee. 



Took up Article 17. 

Voted, at 5.42 p.m., To refer to the Lighting Committee. 

Took up Article 18. 

Voted, at 5.43 p.m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 19. 

Voted, at 6 p.m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 20. 

Voted, at 6.02 p.m., That the pay of the firemen be $75 per 
year. 

Took up Article 21. 

Voted, at 6.03 p.m., That the taxes be collected by the Tax 
Collector and that he receive one per cent of all moneys collected 
and that interest be charged at the rate of six per cent per annum 
from October 15th on all taxes remaining unpaid after November 
1st. 

Took up Article 22. 

Voted, at 6.04 p.m., That the Town Treasurer, with the appro- 
val of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1st, 1917, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts in- 
curred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said finan- 
cial year. 

Took up Article 23. 

Voted, at 6.05 p.m., That all unexpended balances be turned 
into the treasury with the exception of $716.39 the Lowell Street 
appropriation of 1916. 

21 



Took up Article 24. 

Voted, at 6.06 p.m., That the report of the Town Officers be 
accepted. 

Took up Article 25. 

Voted, at 6.08 p.m., To raise by taxation $152,000, and also 
an amount sufficient to meet the State and County taxes. 

Took up Article 26. 

Voted, at 6.20 p.m., To adopt unanimously the following reso- 
lutions: 

Whereas the German Imperial Government has, as the Presi- 
dent has said, forbidden to our people the exercise "of their 
peaceful and legitimate errands on the high seas," and 

Whereas, in consequence, the President of the United States has 
severed diplomatic relations with Germany, be it 

Resolved, by the citizens of Andover, in Town Meeting as- 
sembled this fifth day of March, 1917: 

First, That they commend the President for his uncompromis- 
ing stand in severing diplomatic relations. 

Second, That they rely upon the President to protect American 
citizens and American ships in their acknowledged rights on the 
high seas. 

Third, That they decry the mortifying and unpatriotic action of 
certain United States Senators in failing to adopt legislation 
necessary for the protection of the safety and honor of the 
American people. 

Fourth, That while they desire peace, they desire peace only 
with honor, and call upon the President to uphold at this time 
the honor of the American people. 

Voted, at 6.12 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 
The foregoing is,a true copy of the- Warrant and of the Officer's 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meet- 
ing. 

Attest, 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, 

Town Clerk 

22 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 
Received for tuition and supplies 



Nathan C. Hamblin, teaching 
Eugene V. Lovely, teaching 
Mary L. Smith, teaching 
Elizabeth M. Loftus, teaching 
Mary Remmes, substitute 
Portia Clough, teaching 
Lois J. Reed, teaching 
Edna Simmons, teaching 
Clara Putnam, teaching 
Eleanor Irving, teaching 
Bernice B. Abbott, teaching 
Bernice G. Stimpson, teaching 
Cecilia Derrah, teaching 
Carolyn Dean, teaching 
Etta M. Dodge, teaching 
Alice S. Coutts, teaching 
Cynthia Flint, teaching 
Katherine Hannon, teaching 
Olive D. Waterhouse, teaching 
Elizabeth Otte, teaching 
E. Mae Chase, teaching 
Florence I. Abbott, teaching 
Adele Duval, teaching 
Florance Prevost, teaching 
Helen E. Hartford, teaching 

Amount carried forward 





$52500 


00 




1217 


07 




$53717 


07 


$1438 


13 




1347 


38 




909 


16 




884 


23 




376 


50 




256 


50 




709 


20 




755 


27 




938 


71 




82 


08 




684 


20 




709 


20 




709 


20 




709 


20 




799 


90 




769 


77 




413 


10 




709 


20 




609 


11 




382 


82 




684 


20 . 




709 


20 




709 


20 




709 


20 




719 


76 




sS!7724 42 





23 



Appropriation and Receipts S53717 07 

A mount brought forward 

Sara G. Cummings, teaching 
Florence Dunton, teaching 
Jessie P. Brown, teaching 
Grace Hill, teaching 
Blanche Spaulding, teaching 
Marion Boehm, teaching 
Rubina S. Copeland, teaching 
Edith Johnson, teaching 
Irene Rutherford, teaching 
Helen M. Battles, teaching 
Emma L. Ward, teaching 
Emily F. Carleton, teaching 
Mildred B. Morris, teaching 
Eilene Powers, teaching 
Helen K. Hardy, teaching 
Ella S. Morrill, teaching 
Hallie Stimpson, teaching 
Pauline Meyer, teaching 
Paula Clough, teaching 
Vivian Taylor, teaching 
William B. Hazelton, teaching 
Henry C. Sanborn, superintendent 
Georgianna Lovejoy. clerk 
Beatrice Trombley, substituting 
Irene Rutherford, substituting 
Edith Johnson, substituting 
Miss P. Coppinger, substituting 
Grace Thomas, substituting 
Grace Murray, substituting 
Laura Spence, substituting 
Anne M. Downes, teaching 
Genevieve McXally. teaching 
Louise Magoon, teaching 

Amount carried forward 

24 



S17724 42 


352 


61 


609 


11 


659 


12 


829 


60 


559 


18 


464 


44 


709 


20 


528 


28 


87 


50 


754 


59 


684 


20 


704 


58 


609 


11 


609 


11 


337 


51 


689 


46 


634 


19 


504 


70 


484 


90 


419 


64 


628 


33 


2418 


49 


365 


50 


12 


50 


17 


50 


3 


~ ; 


415 


32 


180 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


V 


60 


248 


00 


226 


95 


$33874 39 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

Anna Nelson, teaching 

Irene Arnold, substituting 

Louisa Dupres, substituting 

Margaret Kimball, substituting 

James A. Eaton, janitor 

James McGhie, janitor 

William McEwan, janitor 

Granville K. Cutler, janitor 

John Crowley, janitor 

William Flint, janitor 

George Spickler. janitor 

Herbert White, janitor 

Annie Mcintosh, matron 

Patrick Driscoll 

Mrs. Eleanor Earley 

Bay State St. Ry., transportation 

County of Essex, tuition 

Boston & Maine R. R., transportation 

Alvah Wright, transportation 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, team hire 

Lawrence Gas Co., lighting 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co. 

Charles H. Newton, transportation 

Charles H. Newton, labor 

Myerscough & Buchan, hire 

W. A. Allen, supplies 

Benjamin Jaques, wood 

Winthrop S. Boutwell 

Leonard Saunders, police duty 

Andover Press, printing and supplies 

F. H. Stacey, supplies 

H. B. Abbott 

Curtis L. Wilson 

Amount carried forward 





$53717 07 


$33874 39 


236 


85 


12 


50 


5 


00 


1 


25 


373 


32 


438 


32 


268 


31 


186 


64 


186 


64 


96 


00 


96 


00 


1157 


43 


228 


00 


324 


00 


79 


13 


960 


00 


113 


72 


949 


91 


600 


00 


130 


50 


226 


15 


83 


38 


480 


00 


14 


74 


11 


00 


20 


95 


10 


00 


2 


56 


5 


50 


276 


15 


32 


60 


1 


50 


1 


50 


$41483 94 



25 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

J. H. Playdon. plants 

Henry C. Sanborn, sundries 

Neostyle Co., supplies 

H. B. McArdle, supplies 

Robert Hutcheson, supplies 

J. H. Campion & Co., supplies 

T. A. Holt Co., supplies 

Hiller & Co.. supplies 

Sarah E. Riley, supplies 

Loose Wiles Co., supplies 

Alice V. Howell, labor 

W. I. Morse, supplies 

Chandler & Barber, supplies 

D. W. Pingree & Co., wood 

S. A. Courtis, supplies 

Silver Burdett & Co., supplies 

Allyn & Bacon, supplies 

D. C. Heath & Co., supplies 

Little Brown & Co., supplies 

A. N. Palmer Co., supplies 

American Book Co., supplies 

Houghton Mifflin Co., supplies 

Ginn & Co., supplies 

Edward E. Babb & Co., supplies 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies 

J. W. Richardson, labor and supplies 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 

Ira Buxton, supplies 

Bride Grimes & Co., supplies 

City of Lawrence ; Industrial School 

City of Lowell, Industrial School 

Wright's Express 

Frances L. Otis, labor 

Amount carried forward 





$53717 


07 


$41483 


94 




16 


00 




83 


94 




9 


10 




29 


79 




3 


45 




257 


76 




55 


50 




6 


14 

55 




4 


96 




27 


60 




111 


72 




59 


64 




68 


96 




8 


46 




48 


55 




36 


07 




70 


57 




29 


84 




30 


15 




114 


32 




33 


05 




320 


38 




651 


04 




93 


94 




114 


66 




77 


53 




5 


65 




113 


66 




46 


62 




100 


00 




17 


75 




17 


55 




$44148 84 





26 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

Wright & Stafford, supplies 

Mary J. Remmes, sundries 

Curtis Standard Research Test 

Massachusetts Child Labor Committee 

C. S. Birchard & Co., supplies 

Chester D. Abbott, milk 

M. E. Dal ton, supplies 

Walter M. Lowney Co., supplies 

Cross Coal Co., coal 

James J. Abbott, wood 

Board of Public Works, water 

R. P. Burnham 

Treat Hardware Co., supplies 

H. I. Daltman Co., supplies 

Frank E. Dodge 

Philip L. Hardy, labor 

William M. Flint, labor 

Paula Clough, sundries 

American Express Company 

James Napier, truant officer 

Andover Coal Co., coal 

James S. May, painting 

Theophilus Muise, repairing 

Frank E. Whiting, repairing 

Grace Woodburn, school nurse 

Andover Steam Laundry 

W. H. Sylvester, tuning pianos 

Lawrence Lumber Co., lumber 

Buchan & McNally, plumbing and repairs 

N. C. Hamblin, sundries 

Bennett Brothers Co., supplies 

Knox Morse Co., supplies 

Fannie S. Lewis, labor 

Amount carried forward 





$53717 


07 


$44148 84 




483 


38 
96 




13 


16 




3 


00 




8 


27 




107 


45 




22 


64 




37 


01 




2015 


84 




44 


50 




605 


83 




34 


80 




6 


85 




66 


18 




83 


25 




1 


10 




1 


50 




1 


20 




15 


78 




36 


47 




1701 


29 




379 


60 




1 


75 




15 


00 




110 


00 
40 




5 


25 




61 


08 




347 


29 




20 


69 




842 


12 




6 


25 




7 


30 




$51236 03 





27 



Appropriation and Receipts S53717 07 

A mount brought forward 
Atkinson Mentzer & Co., supplies 
Underwood Typewriter Co.. supplies 
The Riverdale Press, supplies' 
Oliver Ditson Co., supplies 
H. Sanford Leach 
Tver Rubber Co., supplies 
Allen F. Abbott, labor 
Charles F. Emerson 
Buchan & Francis 
John Haggerty 
John Crowley, labor 
Edward C. Conroy, M. D. 
Wm. D. Walker, M. D. 
Joseph Melanson, labor 
M. J. Stack 

Diamond Spring Water Co., water 
Haynes & Juhlmann, supplies 
Smith & Dove Mfg. Co.. supplies 
Burdett & Williams Co.. supplies 
Knipe Brothers, repairs 
American Seating Co., supplies 

D. Appleton & Co., supplies 
Milton Bradley & Co., supplies 
F. G. Barnard & Co., supplies 
Peter Becket 
L. E. Knott, apparatus 

E. McCabe 

Dionecio Michelini, police duty 
Herbert L. White, police duty 
D. Donovan & Son, repairing 
Andrew Wilson, repairs 
W. F. Duffee & Co., supplies 
Mrs. E. M. Earley, labor 

Amount carried forward 

28 



51236 


03 


3 


59 




50 


8 


94 


10 


30 


3 


50 


4 


00 


9 


00 


6 


84 


72 


19 


8 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


195 


00 


2 


00 


18 


50 


28 


40 


2 


40 


15 


26 


30 


10 


76 


27 


2 


00 


4 


25 


46 


66 


205 


23 


6 


25 


43 


01 


3 


65 


10 


00 


10 


00 


220 


00 


178 


00 


310 


00 


3 


51 


52779 


38 



Appropriation and Receipts 

A mount brought forward 

S. K. Ames, supplies 

H. F. Chase, supplies 

West Disinfecting Co.. supplies 

L. C. Smith Bros., supplies 

George T. Johnson & Co., supplies 

M.T. Walsh & Co., labor 

The Macmillan Publishing Co., supplies 

J. H. Mendell Co., supplies 

Anderson & Bowman, repairing 

Arden Farm, supplies 

Grace Hill, carfares 

Scott T. Shattuck & Son 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 

Goldsmith Clark Co., supplies 

Daniel O'Neill, supplies 

The Gregg Publishing Co., supplies 

William L. Frye, truant officer 

James McGhie, labor 

A. S. Barnes Co., sundries" 

G. B. Robbins Co., supplies 

William Holden, repairing 

United Roof Coating Co., repairing 

Fresh Air Fund, supplies 

Amigraph Supplies Co., supplies 

Richard P. Whitten. repairs 

A. A. Hardy, wood 

Charles L. Bailey, wood 

Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended 



$53717 


07 


S52779 38 




12 82 




2 50 




7 50 




200 00 




60 75 




130 81 




14 13 




17 67 




5 40 




45 50 




1 00 




50 




1 00 




65 




12 00 




44 69 




50 60 




2 00 




49 




8 00 




7 65 




250 00 




18 50 




1 61 




21 75 




5 00 




9 00 




53710 90 




6 17 





S53717 07 $53717 07 



29 



NEW HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 



Balance from last year $69474 09 

Rebate on bill 1 02 

Appropriation March 5, 1917, 10 Bonds and Interest 10011 11 

Interest on deposit (1916) ■ 433 54 

Interest on deposit (1917) ' 1330 30 



J. H. Mendell Co. 

Fisher, Ripley & LeBoutillier 

Bride Grimes Co. 

Suffolk Engraving Co. 

D. W. Pingree Co. 

Olmstead Brothers 

John Franklin 

Columbus School Supply Co. 

Boston & Maine R. R. 

Dionecio Michelini . 

Scientific Equipment Co. 

Hollis French & Allen Hubbard 

Scott Shattuck 

Old Colony Trust Co. 

Macey, Stetson Morris Co. 

Thompson Speare Co. 

Wright Stafford & Son 

Chandler & Barber 

W. R. Brewster 

Buchan & Francis 

Lawrence Gas Co. 



Amount carried fonvard 







81250 06 


S54378 


81 




1606 


09 




13412 


13 




9 


15 




338 


50 




50 


96 




32 


50 




286 


07 




24 


79 




5 


00 




676 


90 




440 


54 




23 


77 




75 


00 




22 


50 




468 


43 




2000 


00 




11 


83 




3 


60 




2593 


10 




85 


40 




$76545 07 





30 



Appropriation and Receipts 




$81250 06 


Amount brought forward- 


$76545 07 


George B. Cressey 


55 


00 


Buchan & McNally 


10 


88 


Board Public Works 


118 


99 


Hopkinson & Holden 


100 


00 


Robertson & Sutherland 


24 


97 


Express 


2 


60 


Smith & Dove Co. 


5 


21 


J. Wilkinson Co. 


446 


05 


H. I. Dallman Co. 


44 


78 


Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 


5 


62 


Premium for redemption of bonds 


2138 


11 


M. J. Stack 


10 


50 


Total expenditure 


79507 


78 


Balance unexpended 


1642 


28 



$81250 06 $81250 06 



31 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropriation March 5, 1917 S6700 00 

George A. Higgins, treasurer S600 00 
George A. Higgins, town clerk, and clerk of 

selectmen 900 00 
Walter S. Donald, selectman, assessor and 

overseer of the poor 600 00 
Charles Bowman, selectman, assessor and 

overseer of the poor 600 00 
Harry M. Eames, chairman selectmen. 

assessors and overseers of the poor 700 00 
Walter H. Coleman, auditor 50 00 
Xesbit G. Gleason, auditor 50 00 
John L. Robertson, auditor 50 00 
Alfred L. Ripley, moderator 10 00 
Daniel J. Murphy, town counsel 398 25 
Registrars of voters 134 00 
Election officers, town meeting 75 00 
Election officers, Precinct 1, primary 67 00 
Apr. 9. Election officers Pre. 2, primary 40 00 
May 14. Election Officers Pre. 1, Consti- 
tutional Convention 75 00 
May 14. Election officers Pre. 2, Consti- 
tutional Convention 40 00 
Oct. 8. Election officers Pre. 1, State pri- 
maries 65 00 
Oct. 8 Election officers Pre. 2, State pri- 
maries 45 00 
Nov. 12. Election officers Pre. 1, State 

election 75 00 



A rr. cunt carried forward $4574 25 

32 



Appropriation March 5, 1917 
Amount brought forward 

Nov. 12. Election officers Pre 2, State 

election 
Dr. J. J. Daly, town physician 
John W. Bell, collector 
Wm. C. Crowley, sealer of weights and 

measures 
Ira B. Hill, field driver 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$6 


700 00 


$4574 25 




40 00 




200 00 




1632 61 




172 50 




26 50 




6645 86 




54 14 





$6700 00 $6700 00 



33 



TOWN HOUSE 



Appropriation March 5, 1917 

George W. Mears, janitor 

William Knipe Co., labor and supplies 

T. A. Holt Co., supplies 

Lawrence Gas Co., gas and electricity 

John W. Richardson, labor 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Peoples Ice Co., ice 

David M. May, labor 

Morandi Proder Co., supplies 

Leonard Saunders, police duty 

Ira Buxton, supplies 

Frank L. Dodge, supplies 

D. P. Webster, police duty 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 

Anderson & Bowman, labor 

Sadie W. Hobbs, laundry 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 

Wright's Express 

Theo Muise, repairing flag 

Andover Coal Co., coal 

American Awning & Tent Co., flag 

James S. May 

Davis Foundry Co., grate 

H. I. Dallman, dust layer 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$2000 00 



S 720 


00 


81 


07 


3 


50 


179 


18 


50 


33 


24 


22 


16 


00 


31 


00 


4 


13 


20 


50 


6 


50 


3 


45 


2 


50 


13 


97 


3 


85 


8 


63 


11 


50 




45 


3 


00 


356 


15 


18 


00 




75 


3 


00 


7 


78 


$1569 46 


430 


54 



$2000 00 $2000 00 



34 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation March 5, 1917 
Fire alarm box 
Earnings of teams 



Poor & Riley, grain 

Haynes & Juhlmann, grain 

Tyer Rubber Co., blowing fire whistle 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

Morrison & O'Connell, supplies 

T. Haggerty, labor 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Walter I. Morse, engineer 

American La France Fire Engine Co., 

supplies 
W. H. Coleman & Co., gasoline 
The Gamewell Fire Alarm and Tel. Co., 

fire alarm box 
The Gamewell Fire Alarm and Tel. Co., 

supplies 
J. W. Winchester, professional services 
Myerscough & Buchan, supplies 
Fred Adams, labor 
Frank L. Cole 

J. H. Campion &. Co., grain, etc. 
Joseph Rand 
T. A. Holt Co., grain 
Andover Steam Laundry 
Crowley & Co.. horse medicine 
George Dick 

Amount carried forward 





S9200 


00 




200 


00 




1168 


30 




10568 


30 


249 20 






34 05 






50 00 






39 68 






23 65 






28 40 






87 66 






100 00 






21 53 






41 35 







177 50 



135 


56 


10 


25 


74 


94 


1 


50 


4 


50 


42 


08 


25 


00 


73 


92 


22 


92 


7 


00 


2 


06 


$1252 


75 



35 



Appropriation and Receipts 


$10568 30 


Amount brought forward 


$1252 75 


T. F. Morrissey & Son, straw, etc. 


23 59 


P. J. Daly, grain 


39 74 


F. H. Stacey, horse medicine 


92 


Lawrence Gas Co. 


• 78 18 


Andover Coal Co., coal 


350 35 


New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 


59 18 


D. A. Collins, repairs 


75 


R. M. Haynes, grain 


55 05 


H. M. Eames, hay 


128 28 


R. A. Bailey, hay 


128 03 


C. A. Hill, supplies 


40 56 


Ira Buxton, repairs and gasoline 


49 61 


L. Resnick 


4 00 


Payroll Engine Co. No. 2 


560 00 


Payroll Engine Co. No. 1 


1175 00 


Buchan & Francis, supplies 


38 00 


Smith & Manning, grain 


19 20 


0. F. Kress & Son, repairs 


5 00 


A. S. Manning, grain 


23 10 


John Collins 


1 00 


John Haggerty, use of telephone 


25 44 


Dayton Tire Co., tires 


421 65 


A. W. Lowe, medicine 


88 


Louis W. Betts 


42 40 


J. E. Pitman, repairs 


26 75 


Anderson & Bowman, shoeing horses 


79 95 


C. F. Emerson 


4 00 


A. M. Colby 


34 95 


Frank L. Dodge 


2 20 


W. F. Taylor 


3 00 


John L. Morrison, shoeing horses 


67 80 


W. & C. Beck, hose 


210 00 


A mount carried forward 


$4951 31 



36 



Appropriation and Receipts 


S10568 3( 


Amount brought forward 


$4951 31 


S. T. Shattuck 


1 30 


C. S. Buchan, chief 


150 00 


John A. Riley, engineer 


100 00 


J. W. Stark " 


5 00 


P. Murnane 


100 00 


Boston Woven Hose Co., fire hose 


280 00 


E. W. Boutwell, hay 


32 00 


American Express Co. 


4 89 


Knipe Brothers, labor and supplies 


9 09 


Wright's Express 


1 60 


Board of Public Works 


42 22 


Ivan E. Steadman, chauffeur 


1092 00 


George Dick, chauffeur 


1056 00 


Lester Hilton, chauffeur 


1092 00 


John Collins, driver 


781 00 


John Haggerty, driver 


866 00 


Total expenditure 


10564 41 


Balance 


3 89 



$10568 30 $10568 30 



37 



BRUSH FIRES 



Appropriation March 5, 1917 




S800 00 


Ira Buxton et al 


$ 25 


25 


A. P. Wright, et al 


57 


25 


Buchan & Francis 


8 


00 


American La France Engine Co. 


12 


00 


C. S. Buchan et al 


35 


75 


George C. Dunnells et al 


7 


75 


Charles A. Hill et al 


17 


00 


N. G. Gleason et al 


6 


00 


Frank Davis et al 


25 


00 


William Carter et al 


4 


00 


Chester H. Harnden et al 


9 


00 


R. Bruce et al 


12 


00 


Total expenditure 


219 


00 


Balance 


581 


00 



S800 00 $800 00 



3S 



POLICE 



Appropriation, March, 1917 
Received from County, dogs killed 



Frank M. Smith, chief 

James Napier, regular police 

Daniel D. Webster, regular police 

William L. Frye, regular police 

Frank M. Smith, carfare, etc. 

Frank Carse, special police 

Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Co., supplies 

Ralph Bruce, police duty, B. Vale 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 

Thos. F. Morrissey & Son, auto hire 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

Thomas F. Dailey, police duty, B. Vale 

Theo. Muise, repairs 

J. G. Johnston & Co. 

C. F. Emerson 

George C. Dunnells, police duty 

Daniel P. Webster, carfare, etc. 

Gray & Kendall, labor 

Leonard Saunders, police duty 

Leonard Saunders, killing dogs 

David M. May, police duty 

James W. Walker, police duty 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 

C. H. Newton, police duty 

Michael T. Welch, police duty 

James H. Green, auto hire 

A mount carried forward 





S5000 00 




42 00 




5042 00 


$1258 33 


953 


00 


953 


00 


953 


00 


8 


54 


27 


00 


51 


25 


72 


00 




75 


46 


50 


4 


25 


72 


00 


2 


50 


34 


50 


3 


51 


2 


10 


4 


50 




30 


64 


35 


42 


00 


20 


00 


42 


00 


68 


71 


18 


36 


115 


85 


8 


00 


$4826 30 



39 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

Myerscough & Buchan, auto hire 
John L. Morrison, repairs 
Chester N. Boutwell, police duty 
C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 
The Traffic Sign Co. 
Wright's Andover Express 
American Express 
Walter I. Morse, supplies 
Ira Buxton, supplies 
O. P. Chase, supplies 
Andover Press, printing 
S. T. Shattuck & Son 
W. B. Hodgkins, police duty 
W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 
Anderson & Bowman, supplies 
Thos. F. Daily, constable duty 
Percy J. Look, medical service 
W. C. Brown, police duty 
Auto List Pub. Co., auto lists 

Total Expended 
Balance 





SSI 


342 00 


S4826 


30 




16 


25 




1 


00 




5 


00 




2 


00 




18 


00 

75 
26 




18 


64 




1 


10 




3 


15 




23 


00 




11 


00 




4 


00 




18 


00 
65 




10 


00 




3 


00 




17 


50 




18 


00 




4997 


00 




45 


00 





S5042 00 $5042 00 



40 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 

Andover Press, printing 

Charles H. Newton, inspector of meat 

Lawrence Tuberculosis Hospital 

Isaac Cuthill, quarantine 

B. F. Haynes, board of health 

Mass. Association, Board of Health 

John Haggerty, labor 

Hobbs & Warren, printing 

A. M. Colby, sign 
Wright's Andover Express 
Allen F. Abbott, labor 

Knipe Brothers, inspect plumbing 

Mrs. Alex Smith, labor at Hunt home 

Andover Pub. Health Asso., visiting nurse 

Lucy B. Abbott, expenses at Hunt place 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, auto hire 

W. H. Coleman & Son, auto hire 

J. H. Sparks, ambulance auto 

City of Lawrence 

Philip L. Hardy, lime 

Charles H. Newton, animal inspection 

Charles H. Newton, use of team 

B. T. Haynes, carfare and expenses 

Amount carried forward 





S2000 00 


S 46 


21 


126 


00 


268 


59 


20 


00 


50 


00 


2 


50 


14 


50 




50 


1 


50 


4 


55 




75 


50 


00 


12 


00 


6 


00 


3 


19 


3 


00 


8 


50 


12 


00 


131 


44 


2 


25 


156 


25 


93 


75 


2 


05 


S1015 


53 



41 



Appropriation $2000 00 

Amount brought forward $1015 53 
Franklin H. Stacey, member Bd. of Health 50 00 

Franklin H. Stacey, milk inspector 75 00 

Franklin H. Stacey 38 46 

Franklin H. Stacey 32 32 

Charles E. Abbott, Sec. Bd. of Health 75 00 

Charles E. Abbott, fumigating, etc. 99 50 

Joseph P. Nolan, inspecting plumbing 108 00 



Total Expenditures $1493 81 

Balance 506 19 



$2000 00 $2000 00 






42 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 




$1200 00 


Burroughs Adding Machine Co. 


8 


00 


Andover Press 


982 49 


Canton Publishing Co. 


1 


25 


Wright & Potter Publishing Co. 


10 


50 


Hobbs & Warren 


15 


04 


P. B. Murphy 


3 


75 


Library Bureau 


1 


00 


E. P. Sellars 


10 


00 


Carter Ink Co. 


1 


25 


Adams Cushing & Foster, cash book 


12 


75 


John H. McDonald 


119 


52 


Henry M. Musk Publishing Co. 


2 


57 


The Birmingham Pen Co. 


5 


75 


Wakefield Daily Item 




75 


Robert K. Slaughter Co. 


20 


00 


Total expenditures 


1194 


62 


Balance 


5 


38 



$1200 00 $1200 00 



43 



SUPPRESSION OF BROWNTAIL AND 

GYPSY MOTHS 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 






S3250 00 


State Highway Commission 






35 63 


Sale of supplies 






69 65 


Private work 






2594 29 




$5949 57 


S. T. Shattuck & Son, labor and serving 








sprayer 


$ 425 


10 




American Express Co. 


2 


07 




Ira Buxton, supplies 


3 


30 




Walter I. Morse, supplies 


91 


89 




Clinton Wire Cloth Co., supplies 


35 


91 




Tyer Rubber Co., supplies 


1 


00 




The Grasseli Chemical Co., arsenate lead 


61 


00 




C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 


3 


90 




A. M. Colby, supplies 




75 




W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 


63 


02 




Anderson & Bowman, repairs 


49 


36 




W. M. Farwell 


41 


56 




Buchan & McNally, supplies 


5 


36 




Boston Coupling Co., supplies 


2 


25 




Edward Berry, labor 


746 


94 




J. Ingalls, labor 


51 


87 




Leonard York, labor 


193 


88 




J. Brookins, labor 


177 


40 


' 


E. Baker, labor 


566 


28 




T. McDonald, labor 


213 


18 




Albert Jones, labor 


403 


91 




J^ Fallon, labor 


16 


88 





A mount carried forward 



$3156 81 



44 



Appropriation and Receipts 




Amount brought forward 


S3156 81 


H. Murphy, labor 


308 13 


E. Tasser, labor 


496 54 


William Hatch, labor 


151 87 


Pat Tucker, labor 


192 37 


Chester Harnden, labor 


416 76 


C. Shattuck, labor 


73 80 


Austin Riley, labor 


40 96 


A. Wickey, labor 


40 37 


J. Bagley, labor 


32 81 


C. Knight, labor 


46 60 


F. Davis, labor 


5 00 


T. H agger ty, labor 


5 00 


S. Cady, labor 


30 94 


A. Cady, labor 


3 10 


Paul Cheney, labor 


43 66 


Martin Doherty, labor 


71 84 


Nathaniel Shattuck, labor 


25 44 


William Smith, labor - 


19 25 


J. Shevlin, labor 


29 57 


Freeman Abbott, hauling sprayer 


248 25 


Charles Shattuck, labor 


8 61 


Michael Shea, labor 


24 00 


Henry Shorten, labor 


17 50 


H. Jones, labor 


20 25 


J. H. Playdon, labor 


210 00 


R. Greenwood, labor 


18 00 


P. Murfield, labor 


3 75 


F. Riordan, labor 


3 75 


R. Wright, labor 


6 75 


J. Williams, labor 


3 75 


Jerry Golden, labor 


37 50 


J. H. Playdon, use of horse 


58 00 


Richard Major, labor 


11 50 


Amount carried forward 


S5862 43 



S5949 57 



45 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

E. Murphy 

Mass. Forestry Department, supplies 

Total expenditures 
Balance 





S5949 57 


S5862 43 




18 00 




22 87 




S5903 30 




46 27 





S5949 57 S5949 57 



46 



TREE WARDEN 



Appropriation 
Sale of wood 



Edward Berry, labor 
E. Tasser, labor 
A. Jones, labor 
E. Baker, labor 
E. Murphy, labor 
Michael Shea, labor 
J. E. Pitman, lumber 
M. T. Walsh, repairs 
Follansbee Nursery, trees 
Carl Rogers, cutting wood 
Jos. Svigney, cutting wood 





S250 


00 




551 


25 




$801 


25 


S 62 82 






61 13 






13 88 






67 86 






36 75 






18 00 






44 






36 






45 00 






241 90 






123 39 







Total Expenditure 671 53 

Balance 129 72 



S801 25 $801 25 



47 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation, March 5, 1197 

Interest from perpetual care deposits 

Yearly care of lots 

Sale of lots 

Interments 

Building foundations 

Sale of lumber 

Sale of wood 

Grading, etc. on lots 



Joseph F. Cole, new work east side 

cemetery 
Installing water supply 
J. W. Richardson, lumber 
J. E. Pitman, lattice 
Andover Press, printing etc. 
S. T. Shattuck, teaming 
F. E. Dodge, lime and cement 
American Stationery Co., card cases 
Buchan & McNally, pipe fittings 
Board of Public Works, water 
A. M. Colby, repairing cover 
Anderson & Bowman, drills 
Joseph Stanley, sods 
George Seymour, dynamite 
T. A. Holt Co., fertilizer 
George Millett, shrubs 
W. I. Morse, tools and hardware 
A. Remmes, hand-cart 



Amount carried forward $2103 55 

48 





$2500 00 




163 00 




271 50 




257 00 




208 00 




91 48 




20 00 




34 50 




65 56 




$3611 04 


$1493 98 




300 77 




51 12 




4 32 




17 75 




25 00 




28 15 




9 00 




4 00 




2 54 




1 25 




5 35 




6 65 




6 12 




1 85 




40 48 




95 22 




10 00 





Appropriation and Receipts 


S3611 04 


Amount brought forward 


S2103 55 


E. F. Conkey, repairing fence 


6 00 


Smith & Manning, fertilizer 


18 48 


Postage 


11 16 


Joseph F. Cole, pay roll 


79 78 


Fred F. Wiss, superintendent 


828 00 


Charles E. Shorten, labor 


229 98 


Herbert W. Ford, labor 


2 75 


C. L. Wilson, labor 


16 73 


Charles J. Shorten, labor 


195 23 


William Quinn, labor 


24 32 


James Waldie, labor 


2 75 


A. J. Lundgren, labor 


82 15 



Total expenditure S3600 88 

Unexpended balance 10 16 



$361 1 04 $3611 04 



49 



INSURANCE 



impropriation, March 5, 1917 
Smart & Flagg 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



S3500 00 



S3390 68 

S3390 68 
109 32 



S3500 00 S3500 00 



HAY SCALES 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 
Ira Buxton 
W. C. Brown 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$125 00 



$ 33 33 
66 67 

100 00 
25 00 



S125 00 $125 00 



50 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 S6500 00 

Lawrence Gas Co. S6187 24 



Total expenditure 6187 24 

Balance 312 76 



S6500 00 S6500 00 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 S350 00 

Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster S350 00 



Total expenditure S350 00 S350 00 



51 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Appropriation, March 5, 1917 $1800 00 

F. S. Boutwell, Treasurer Memorial Hall 

Library $1800 00 



Total expenditure $1800 00 $1800 00 



POST 99, G. A. R. 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 $100 00 

Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster $100 00 



Total expenditure $100 00 $100 00 



SEWER SINKING FUND 

Appropriation, March 5, 1917 $1000 00 

Dec. 18, W. B. Hodgkins, Treasurer 

Sinking Fund $1000 00 



Total expenditure $1000 00 $1000 00 



WATER SINKING FUND 

Appropriation, March 5. 1917 $750 00 

Dec. 18, W. B. Hodgkins, Treasurer 

Sinking Fund $750 00 



Total expenditure $750 00 $750 00 

52 



STATE TAX AND HIGHWAY TAX 

Andover's proportion of State and High- 
way Tax S24535 00 

Charles L. Burrill. Treas. and Receiver 

General S24535 00 



Total expenditure $24535 00 $24535 00 



COUNTY TAX 

Andover's proportion of County Tax SI 563 2 36 

Nov. 1, David I. Robinson, County 

Treasurer $15632 36 



Total expenditure $15632 36 $15632 36 



DOG TAX 

Received from County Treasurer $625 64 

Nov. 23, paid F. S. Boutwell, Treasurer 

Memorial hall $625 64 



Total expenditure $625 64 $625 64 



53 



NOTES GIVEN 



Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, Note 
No. 39 due Nov. 10, Rate 
3.88 $25000 00 

Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, Note 
No. 40 due Nov. 17, 
Rate 3.88 25000 00 

Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, Note 
No. 41, due Dec. 1, Rate 
3.88 10000 00 

Mar. 16, Andover Nalional Bank, Note 
No. 42, due Dec. 8, Rate 
3.88 10000 00 

Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, Note 
No. 43, due Dec. 15, Rate 
3.88 10000 00 



Total notes issued 



$80000 00 



54 



NOTES PAID 



Nov. 10, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 39 $25000 00 

Nov. 20, Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 40 25000 00 

Dec. Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 41 10000 00 

Dec. Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 42 10000 00 

Dec. Andover National Bank, Note 

No. 43 10000 00 



Total notes paid 



S80000 00 



55 



INTEREST 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 
Interest on deposits in National Bank 



Jan. 23, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

2 Water coupons 
Feb. 2, Old Colony Trust Co., 15 

Water coupons 
Mar. 15, Bureau of Statistics, Com. of 

Mass. Notes, 39 to 43 

inclusive 
Mar. 15, Andover National Bank, Int. 

on Notes 39 to 43 inclusive 
Mar. 21, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Water coupon 
Mar. 21, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Sewer coupon 
Mar. 22, Old Colony Trust Co., 10 

Sewer coupons 
Mar. 22, Old Colony Trust Co. 100 

High School coupons, 
Mar. 22, Old Colony Trust Co., 24 

Water coupons 
April 9, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

16 Water coupons 
April 24, Old Colony Trust Co., 8 

Water coupons 
April 24, Old Colony Trust Co., 20 

Andover Loan Act. 
May 21, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 



Amount carried forward S6094 83 

56 





$17000 00 




1009 28 




$18009 28 


$ 40 00 




300 00 




10 00 




2187 33 




17 50 




20 00 


• 


200 00 




2000 00 




480 00 




280 00 




160 00 




400 00 





Appropriation and Receipts SI 8009 28 

Amount brought forward S6094 83 

17 Water coupons 340 00 

June 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

34 Water coupons at 17J/0 595 00 

June 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

11 Water coupons at 20 220 00 

June 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

2 Sewer coupons 40 00 
June 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

23 Water coupons 460 00 

June 14, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

10 Water coupons 200 00 

June 14, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

27 Sewer coupons 540 00 

June 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 10 

Water coupons 200 00 

June 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 70 

Sewer coupons 1400 00 

July 25, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

3 Water coupons 60 00 
Aug. 29, Old Colony Trust Co., 15 

Water coupons 300 00 

Sept. 7, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Water coupon 20 00 

Sept. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 100 

High School coupons 2000 00 

Sept. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 23 

Water coupons 460 00 

Sept. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 10 

Sewer coupons ■ 200 00 

Oct. 23, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

15 Water coupons at 17.50 262 50 
Oct. 26, Old Colony Trust Co., 20 

Andover Loan 400 00 



Amount carried forward SI 3792 33 

57 



Appropriation and Receipts SI 8009 82 

Amount brought forward S 13792 33 

Oct. 26, Old Colony Trust Co., 7 

Water coupons 140 00 

Nov. 6, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

10 Water coupons 200 00 

Nov. 20, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

15 Water coupons 300 00 

Dec. 5, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

32 Water coupons at 17.50 560 00 
Dec. 5, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

66 Water coupons 520 00 

Dec. 5, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

13 Sewer coupons 260 00 

Dec. 11, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

7 Sewer coupons 140 00 
Dec. 11, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

2 Water coupons 40 00 

Dec. 19, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

8 Sewer coupons 160 00 
Dec. 20, Old Colony Trust Co., 65 

Sewer coupons 1300 00 

1918 Old Colony Trust Co., 8 

Water coupons 160 00 

Jan. 2, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Sewer coupon 20 00 



Total expenditure S17592 33 

Balance 416 95 



S18009 28 S18009 82 



58 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917, 
Water 

Punchard School 
Andover Loan Act 
Interest and premium on A. H. S. L. 
Water Bond Premium 
Sewer Bond Premium and Assessments 



Mar. 22, Old Colony Trust Co., Water 

Bond, No. 287 $1000 00 

April 9, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water bonds, No. 216 1000 00 

April 24, Old Colony Trust Co., Water 

bond, No. 1000 00 

June 1, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

1 Water bonds, 239-249 2000 00 

June 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 2 

Water bonds, 341-342 2000 00 

June 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 5 

Sewer bonds, 146-150 inc. 5000 00 
Aug. 29, Old Colony Trust Co., 1 

Water bond, No. 316 1000 00 

Sept. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 5 

Andover High School bonds 5000 00 
Oct. 26, Old Colony Trust Co., 5 

Andover Loan Act bonds 5000 00 
Nov. 6, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water bonds, 136-140 inc. 5000 00 

Total 



SI 2949 


22 


2861 


89 


5000 


00 


2131 


11 


50 


78 


5000 


00 


$28000 00 



$28000 00 $28000 00 



59 



RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917, Acts 1912 $300 00 

James Saunders $300 00 



Total expenditure $300 00 $300 00 



PUBLIC DUMP 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 $75 00 

Olof Benson S75 00 



60 



Total expenditure $75 00 $75 00 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

American Express Co. 

Myerscough & Buchan 

Bradley & Dooley, decree for Wm. Bbland 

Banjamin Jaques 

J. A. Ryley 

Patrick J. Barrett 

James S. May 

F. A. Buttrick 

T. F. Morrissey & Son 

Andover National Bank 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Mary E. Faulkner, settlement of claims 

Carfare and expenses of selectmen attend- 
ing hearings, etc. 

Lilla D. Stott, returns of transfer of real 
estate and probate returns 

Ira B. Hill, extra field driver 

Lawrence Awning and Decoration Co., 
decorating town hall 

W. & L. E. Gurley, repairs on scales 

W. H. Coleman & Co. 

Thomas F. Dailey 

Madeleine Hughes, copying records 

Percy J. Look, M.D., return of births 

E. D. Lane, M.D., return of births 

A mount carried forward 





S2000 00 


11 


21 


1 


39 


16 


00 


668 


62 


5 


50 


26 


65 


3 


00 


3 


00 


41 


25 


34 


50 


5 


00 




75 


350 


00 



32 30 



43 


02 


6 


00 


10 


00 


8 


69 


4 


00 


5 


00 


53 


38 


5 


50 


6 


00 



S1340 76 



61 



Appropriation 

Amount brought forward 
W. D. Walker, M.D., return of births 
C. E. Abbott, M.D., return of births 
T. J. Cullinane, M.D., return of births 
E. C. Conroy, M.D., return of births 
J.J. Daly, M.D., return of births 
M.J. Mahoney, return of deaths 
E. M. Lundgren, return of deaths 
Geo. A. Higgins, sundry expenses 
B. &. M. R. R., R. R. tickets 
W. F. Gledhill, fish warden 
Banker & Tradesman, paper 

Total expenditure 
Balance 





$2000 00 


$1340 76 




8 00 




1 00 




25 




75 




5 50 




4 25 




20 50 




9 80 




27 50 




10 00 




5 00 




$1433 31 




566 69 




$2000 00 


$2000 00 



62 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The Overseers of the Poor submit the following report for the 
year ending December 31, 1917: — 

During the year past, but little occurred outside the usual 
routine. 

A part of the farm land was utilized by the Committee on 
Public Safety to provide gardens for those who desired to cul- 
tivate them, Superintendent Swanton aiding those who were not 
familiar with the raising of vegetables; but the results achieved, 
not only from these plots, but also from the rest of the farm were 
far from satisfactory, owing to the peculiar season. 

When the fire was started in the heating plant, several of the 
tubes in the boiler were in such a condition, that it was necessary 
to replace five, and during the present year the boiler will prob- 
ably have to be entirely re-tubed. Other than this, with the 
usual painting and whitewashing, no repairs seem necessary. 

The personnel of our inmates remains about the same as last 
year, those of advanced years and weakened systems. We can 
but feel that they are indeed fortunate in having such pleasant 
surroundings, with those who take pleasure in administering to 
their comfort and happiness. 

For Almshouse expense we would ask that the sum of $4500.00 
be appropriated, for repairs (re-tubing boiler), $400.00; to meet 
the requirements of Chap. 763, Acts of 1913, an act for suitably- 
aiding mothers with dependent children, the sum of $500.00. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Overseers of the Poor 



63 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 
Receipts from town farm 



Lawrence Gas Co. 

Frank L. Cole, clothing 

S. K. Ames, supplies 

H. Bruckman, grain 

J. H. Campion & Co., groceries 

Frank L. Holt, labor 

F. C. Small Co., groceries 

Hiller & Co., supplies 

Robert Hutcheson, fish 

D. F. Chase, provisions 

Reid & Hughes, dry goods 

T. A. Holt Co., groceries 

Smith & Manning, groceries 

Lindsay & Young, provisions 

Walter I. Morse, hardware 

Henry Barnard, supplies 

Peter Henderson & Co., supplies 

Robertson & Sutherland Co., dry goods 

Crowley & Co., drugs 

W. A. Nelson, supplies 

Frank H. Hardy, supplies 

Charles Robinovitz, shoes and repairing 

H. F. Tripp, supplies 

George Brown, shoes and repairing 

Anderson & Bowman, blacksmith work 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 

O. P. Chase, supplies 

Andover Committee on Public Safety, seed 



Amount carried forward $2521 57 

64 







$4500 0° 






1087 60 




5587 60 


$ 159 


37 




S3 


70 




39 


37 




275 


43 




95 


27 




16 


20 




119 


48 




27 


73 


- 


66 


11 




219 


58 




169 


65 




662 


03. 




139 


86 




179 38 




38 


08 




4 


25 




13 


80 


• 


29 42 




12 


75 




37 


95 




28 


40 




12 


35 




3 


69 




17 


50 




45 


55 




58 


87 




9 


50 




6 


30 





Appropriation and Receipts 
Amount brought forward 
Daniel Barberian labor 
Frank E. Whiting, supplies 
C. A. Hill Co., washing machine and supplies 
Standard Oil Co., supplies 
George D. Ward, labor 
Chester D. Abbott, supplies 
Andover Board of Public Works, water 

F. M. Downs, labor 
Providence Churning Co., supplies 
Armour & Co., supplies 
Albert W. Lowe, drugs 
T. F. Morrissey & Son, straw 
R. H. Sugatt, clothing 
A. M. Colby, supplies 
Hugh Kydd, labor 
Buchan & McNally, supplies 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Family Shoe Store, supplies 
Hiland F. Holt, dentistry 
Tyer Rubber Co., supplies 
A. S. Manning, groceries 
Andover Coal Co., coal 
Walter C. Boyce, pasturing heifers 
Elmer F. Conkey, labor 
Beach Soap Co., supplies 
Andrew Basso, supplies 

G. L. Averill, fertilizer 
M. B. McTernen, dentistry 
Smith & Dove Co., burlap 
Peoples' Ice Co., ice 
Joseph Stanley, labor 
John A. Collins, labor 

A mount carried forward 



$5587 60 



$2521 


57 


10 


00 


2 


65 


; 193 


72 


2 


75 


36 


12 


3 


50 


54 


23 


3 


00 


54 


00 


15 


60 


30 


15 


13 


68 


3 


00 


4 


25 


38 


00 


1 


75 




50 




60 


1 


50 


1 


09 


42 


94 


292 


50 


22 


50 


6 


00 


16 


06 


8 


34 


8 


75 


1 


00 




96 


65 


00 


9 


00 


75 


00 


$3539 


71 



65 



Appropriation and Receipts 




$5587 60 


Amount brought forward 


$3539 71 




Tree Warden, wood 


120 00 




Fred A. Swan ton, superintendent 


800 00 




Lawrence Sanburn, labor 


68 00 




D. J. C. Sharp, labor 


30 00 




Alice F. Kimball, labor 


78 00 




W. C. Boyce, labor 


10 50 




Mark A. Wadlin, labor 


12 50 




Annie Keenan, labor 


44 00 




Annie W. Swanton, labor 


83 33 




Isabel Sinclair, labor 


307 00 




Bertha Jansson, labor 


288 00 




Total expenditure 


$5381 04 




Balance 


206 56 






$5587 60 


$5587 60 



ALMSHOUSE REPAIRS 

Appropriation, March 5, 1917 $250 00 

Edward Ward, labor 

Lawrence Lumber Co., supplies 

George D. Ward, labor 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

Merrimack Boiler Co., supplies 

Ira Buxton, labor 

Gray & Kendall, labor 

Frank E. Dodge, labor and supplies 

C. I. Alexander & Sons, labor and supplies 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$ 4 


50 


14 


00 


45 


00 


47 


15 


85 


90 


7 


00 


2 


75 


10 


20 


17 


00 


$233 50 


16 


50 



$250 00 $250 00 



66 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 
Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 



S1039 25 



$900 00 



139 25 



STATE AID 



S1039 25 $1039 25 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 

Total expenditure 

Balance 



$1300 00 



$1230 00 
70 00 



S1300 00 $1300 00 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 
Town cases 

On account other cities 
On account of State 



$500 00 



$564 00 
217 00 
172 50 



Total expenditure $953 50 

Due from other cities and towns $144 67 

Due from state 328 16 472 83 



Net expenditure 
Balance 



67 



480 67 
19 33 



$500 00 $500 00 



RELIEF OUT OF ALMSHOUSE 



Appropriation, March 5, 1917 

Paid out of Almshouse 

Paid other cities and towns 

Paid State 

Paid on account other cities and towns 

Paid on account State 



Total expenditure 

Due from other cities and towns 

Due town from State 



Net expenditure 
Balance 







S4300 00 




S3696 36 






253 84 






134 16 




ywns 


43 25 
119 70 






S4247 31 




$43 25 






119 70 








162 95 






$4084 36 






215 64 





$4300 00 $4300 00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMSHOUSE 



House furniture 
Clothing 
Farm stock 
Farm tools 
Farm produce 
Fuel 
Provisions 



$1300 00 


400 


00 


1000 


00 


350 


00 


499 


00 


550 


00 


175 


00 



$4274 00 



68 



ALMSHOUSE SUPERINTENDENT'S 

REPORT 



Number of inmates in the almshouse, January 1, 1917 14 

Number admitted during the year 6 

Number discharged during the year 4 

Number died during the year 2 

Number sent to Tewksbury 1 

Number in almshouse, January 1, 1918 13 

Over eighty years of age 5 

Between seventy and eighty 2 

Between sixty and seventy 4 

Between fifty and sixty 1 

Under fifty 1 



FARM CASH REPORT 




Received for 




Cows and boarding cows S 


526 00 


Service of bull 


2 00 


Milk 


54 78 


Calves 


8 00 


Pigs 


179 00 


Eggs 


135 85 


Chickens 


4 00 


Vegetables 


41 25 


Old iron 


1 40 


Old wheelbarrow 


3 00 


On hay bill of 1916 


3 00 


Use of cart 


6 75 


Boarding Miss Buckley 


104 00 


Boarding Thomas Bentley 


96 00 


Charles Smith Estate 


172 57 



S1337 60 



69 



Paid for 

Cows 250 00 

Cash to balance 1087 60 



$1337 60 S1337 60 
FRED A. SWANTON, Superintendent 



70 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual report. 
Number of male polls assessed 2162 

Personal estate S1588660 00 

Real estate 6228600 00 

$7817260 00 



Poll tax $ 4324 00 

Tax on personal property 32569 26 

Tax on real estate 127688 73 

$ 164581 99 

Rate of taxation per $1000 S20 50 
Number of 

Horses assessed 546 

Cows assessed 1027 

Cattle other than cows assessed 239 

Sheep assessed 28 

Swine assessed 249 

Fowl assessed 14005 

Dwellings assessed 1612 

Acres of land assessed 17936 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

A ssessors of A ndover 



71 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



We do hereby submit our annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1917. 

This year showed a large increase in the number of contagious 
diseases reported to the Board, there being a total of 328, com- 
pared with 164 in 1916. This increase was due mostly to epi- 
demics of chickenpox. german measles, and mumps. This does 
not necessarily mean that there was an increase in the number 
of cases in the town but that there were more reported this year. 

Without doubt the work of the school nurses was one of the 
principal reasons as they reported a total of 79 cases, mostly of 
a mild form where the child was not ill enough to need the 
services of a physician. 

The following is a classified list compared with 1916: 

1916 1917 

Chickenpox 5 60 

Diphtheria 12 12 

German Measles 2 82 

Ophthalmia 1 

Infantile Paralysis 2 

Measles 9 61 

Mumps 34 83 

Scarlet Fever 5 12 

Tuberculosis 12 9 

Typhoid Fever 6 5 

W r hooping-cough 74- 3 

Spinal Meningitis 2 

Lobar Pneumonia (not reportable) 1 

There were twenty deaths during 1917 from communicable 

diseases, compared with thirteen for 1916. Lobar pneumonia 

caused seven deaths, -tuberculosis twelve, and diphtheria one. 

Lobar pneumonia was added to the list of reportable diseases this 

year by the State Department of Health. 

Owing to the unsanitary conditions of the properties on the 

easterly side of Baker's Lane, due mostly to the presence of 

72 



outside earth vaults, we have condemned the same; the owners 
were notified that their premises constituted a public nuisance 
and were a menace to health. We were unfortunate in regard to 
the cold weather which set in so early and has continued to date, 
whereby it was impossible to remedy the conditions; but this 
will be attended to as soon as the mild weather comes, or else 
the premises must be vacated. 

In cooperation with the State Department of Health, the 
present quarters of the Police Department in the Town House 
were viewed and the same condemned as being unfit for the 
purpose for which they were used. 

Many sewer connections were made this year under orders of 
the Board, and we expect that the few remaining will be con- 
nected as soon as the weather permits. In some cases it has been 
necessary to take up the matter through the town counsel. 

Owing to the present conditions in regard to food supplies, 
we have waived, in many cases, the restrictions relating to the 
keeping of swine, etc., provided it is agreed to keep the premises 
in a sanitary condition. 

Early in the fall we received a petition signed by many property 
owners and residents of Ballardvale regarding the Lyster Chem- 
ical Company. We viewed the premises, and called on the town 
counsel for advice. He informed us that it would be a very 
difficult matter for any local board of health to adjust in view 
of the many legal complications; he also stated that the most 
practical solution would be through civil suits instituted by the 
owners of the property involved. 

Later a hearing was held in regard to the matter. Dr. Simpson 
of the State Board of Health was present and took the question 
under advisement, so that it is now resting with the State De- 
partment of Health. 

The fumes of sulphureted hydrogen from the Beaver Chemical 
Company have been the cause of many complaints, and un- 
fortunately this also comes under the same ruling, that while 
it may constitute a nuisance, and be a damage to property, a 
local Board of Health would have to prove that it was an "actual 
or absolute danger to flesh and blood". 

73 



Owing to better service given by the Postoffice Department, 
whereby diphtheria cultures could be sent in any first-class 
pouch including "catcher pouches", we discontinued having our 
diagnosis cultures done by a Lawrence bacteriologist and feel 
that the results have been equally as good. 

The appointments of the Board were: Mr. George A. Higgins 
to act as clerk in the matter of registration of births and deaths. 
Mr. Charles H. Newton was nominated Inspector of Slaughtering 
and this nomination was approved by the State Department of 
Health. 

Miss Emily Sprague was appointed special agent for the Board 
to act in certain cases. 

The expenditures for the year follow : — 

Appropriation March 5, 1917 $2000 00 

Wm. Knipe, Asst. Plumbing Inspector 

Chas. H. Newton, Animal Inspector 

Chas. H. Newton, Inspector Slaughtering 

Franklin H. Stacey, Inspector Milk 

Membership Massachusetts Association 

Boards of Health 
Joseph P. Nolan, Inspector Plumbing 
Andover Press 

Dr. Chas. E. Abbott, Sec, salary 
Bancroft T. Haynes, salary 
Franklin H. Stacey, salary 
John Haggerty, labor 
A. M. Colby, sign 
Allen F. Abbott, labor 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 
Burying dead animals 
Transportation 
Telephone tolls 

Tel. Lawrence, service and listing 
Postage 
Supplies 

906 47 
74 



$ 50 00 


250 


00 


126 


00 


75 


00 


2 


50 


108 


00 


46 


21 


75 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


14 


50 


1 


50 




75 




50 


3 


05 


16 


70 


2 


62 


30 


00 


2 


89 


1 


25 



Contagious Diseases 



Lawrence Tuberculosis Hospital 

Quarantine 

Mrs. Alex. Smith 

Andovef Public Health Association 

Miss Lucy B. Abbott 

T. F. Morrissey & Son 

W. H. Coleman 

Dr. Sparks, ambulance 

Philip Hardy, lime 

Wright's Express 

Fumigation 

Telephone tolls 

Fumigators 

Transportation 

Supplies, miscellaneous 



Total expenditure 



400 


03 


20 


00 


12 


00 


6 


00 


3 


19 


3 


00 


8 


50 


12 


00 


2 


25 


4 


55 


83 


50 


5 


52 


21 


55 


3 


00 


2 


25 



587 34 



1493 81 



Balance 



506 19 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANKLIN H. STACEY, Ph.C. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M. D. 



75 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF 

To the Board of Selectmen: 

Dear Sirs : — I hereby submit the following report of the Fire 
Department for the year ending 1917. 

The Department has the same equipment as last year, consist- 
ing of one combination pump, chemical and hose, one combina- 
tion chemical and hose, one fourth-class steam fire engine, two 
horse-drawn hose wagons, one horse-drawn ladder truck, one sup- 
ply wagon, one pung and four horses. 

The working force is as follows: 3 engineers, 5 permanent men 
and 26 call men. 

We have responded to 37 alarms for grass or brush fires, 6 
automobile fires, 35 house fires, 2 false alarms and 2 out of town 
calls, one to Lawrence, one to Tewksbury. 

We have laid 10,597 feet of hose, raised 587 feet of ladders and 
used 1175 gallons of chemicals. 

Combination No. 1 has travelled 21 2^ miles. 

Combination No. 2 has travelled 91 4-10 miles. 

Value of buildings and contents where fires have occurred 

8310,750 00 

Insurance on buildings and contents where fires have 

occurred S250.350 00 

Loss on buildings and contents where fires have 

occurred S2,620 00 

76 



One new fire alarm box No. 542 has been installed on No. Main 
Street, between Rubber Shop and Railroad bridge. 

The battery elements have been renewed and are in good 
shape; new wires have been hung in several places where the re- 
moval of poles has made it necessary. 

The Board of Engineers recommend the appropriation of 
$9,400.00 for running expenses, new hose and repairs and addi- 
tions that are deemed necessary. 

Respectfully submitted 

CHARLES S. BUCHAN 

Chief Engineer 



77 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



CHIEF'S REPORT 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the Police De- 
partment for the year ending December 31, 1917. 
Whole number of arrests Males 154 Females 2 Total 156 

Offences for which arrests were made 

Non-support 2 

Abuse of wife 2 

Larceny 9 

Violation of Automobile Law 14 

Bastardy 1 

Drunk 30 

Common drunk 11 

Assault 9 

Delinquency 12 

Cafe-keeping 2 

Malicious mischief 6 

Evading fares 1 

Vagrancy 4 

Disturbance 16 

nsane 6 

Peddling without license 3 

Violation of town ordnance 8 

Threat to destroy building 1 

Cruelty to animals 4 

Trespass 6 

Stubborn child 1 

Out-of-town officers 6 

Having no card of registration 2 

78 



DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Appealed 2 

Continued 16 

Committed to State Farm 2 

Committed to House of Correction 7 

Committed to insane asylum 6 

Discharged 29 

Held for Grand Jury 1 

Held for out-of-town officers 6 

Paid fines 42 

On probation 32 

On file 10 

Committed to Tewksbury 3 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Fines paid in lower court 240 00 

Burglaries reported 5 

Doors found open and secured 47 

Dogs killed 42 
Value of property stolen $1000 00 

Value of property recovered 600 00 

Value of police equipment 400 00 

SUPERIOR COURT FINDINGS 

Eight months sentence 1 

On probation 2 

No bill found 2 

Respectfully submitted 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Chief of Police 



79 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



John L. Smith died March 14, 1917. 

Your trustees are again called upon to record the loss of 
another of their oldest and most valued members. Mr. John L. 
Smith was chosen by the town in 1893 as one of the Cemetery 
Trustees, and for twenty-four years has given freely of his 
experience and time toward the development of the cemetery. 
For many years he has served as chairman of the Board of 
Trustees, and his constant interest and faithful counsel has 
been of the greatest assistance to his associates on the Board. 

At the annual meeting in March, an additional appropriation 
of $1500 was granted the trustees for the purpose of extending 
the cemetery lay-out on the east side of the Old Railroad Bed. 
This work was carried forward to the extent of the appropriation 
and has in large measure opened up a tract sufficient for the 
requirements of the town for several years. It will require, 
however, considerable work at surfacing and plotting this tract 
of land to make it immediately available for sale, and we there- 
fore ask for this purpose an appropriation of $1500, in addition 
to the regular appropriation of $1000 and the proceeds from the 
sale of lots and other receipts for work done in the cemetery. 

FELIX G. HAYNES 
WALTER I. MORSE 
GEORGE D. MILLETT 
DANIEL H. POOR 
WARREN L. JOHNSON 
JOHN W. BELL 

Cemetery Trustees 
December 31, 1917 



80 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY STATISTICS 

Lots sold as per last report 459 

Lots sold in 1917 7 



Total lots sold 466 

Total number of single graves sold 174 

Interments as per last report 1276 

Interments in 1917 50 



Total interments 1326 

J. W. BELL 
Clerk of Board of Trustees 
December 31, 1917 



81 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 



We are still following out the custom of planting a few trees 
each year in the districts where needed, but most of the work 
done by this department was in trimming up the shade tree 
in the residential part of the town and in the outlying districts, 
as in a great many places it was almost impossible for covered 
carriages to pass. We have tried to remedy this by removing 
some of the lower branches which all will agree has helped the 
situation, and as this work should be carried further along these 
lines, I ask that the sum of $250 be appropriated for this depart- 
ment. 

Respectfully, 

J. H. PLAYDON 

Tree Warden 



82 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



In submitting my report of this Department, I desire to call 
your attention to the fact that owing to war conditions the 
cost of material as well as labor has greatly increased and we are 
obliged to ask the co-operation of every property owner to do his 
part in suppressing the moth pest. 

The past two years have been very unsatisfactory for spraying 
owing to the wet season, and in some places the gypsy moth has 
increased while the browntail moth has entirely disappeared. 
The situation looks more hopeful and if weather conditions are 
favorable this spring, we should see a marked decrease next fall. 
Roadside cutting has been done on several of the roads in the 
outlying districts and in order that this work may be continued, 
I w T ould ask that the sum of S3500 be appropriated for this 
department. 

Respectfully, 

J. H. PLAYDON 

Local Superintendent 



83 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen : — I hereby submit my report for the year begin- 
ning November 15, 1916, and ending November 15, 1917. 
Number of cattle inspected 1191 
Number of stables inspected 158 
Number of cows condemned because affected with 

tuberculosis 22 

Number of stables disinfected 21 

Number of interstate cattle identified and released 52 

Number of cases of glanders 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. NEWTON 

Inspector of A nimals 



84 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Town House, fixtures and furniture 


$50000 00 




Engine house, storehouse and barn 


25000 00 




25723 ft. land 


20000 00 


$95000 00 






Memorial Hall 


30000 00 




22318 ft. land 


10000 00 


40000 00 


Engine house, Ballardvale 


6000 00 




New shed 


200 00 




1-3 acre land 


250 00 








6450 00 


Almshouse 


16000 00 


Barn and other buildings 


3800 00 




311-2 acres land 


5000 00 


24800 00 


Punchard High School 


94000 00 


4 acres land 


8000 00 


102000 00 


Heating plant, Jackson schoolhouse 


30000 00 




John Dove schoolhouse 


25000 00 




Stowe schoolhouse 


31000 00 




3 3-4 acres of land 


6000 00 


92000 00 


Bradlee schoolhouse, Ballardvale 


23000 00 




1 acre land 


500 00 


23500 00 


Richardson schoolhouse 


7000 00 


1-2 acre land 


400 00 


7400 00 




$■ 


Amount carried forward 


391150 00 



85 



Anion n t brought forward 
Indian Ridge schoolhouse 
1 acre land 

West Center schoolhour-c 
1-2 acre land 

North District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Bailey District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Osgood District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Old Schoolhouse. Ballardvale 
1-4 acre land 

9 acres, Indian Ridge (Gravel Pit) 

41 1-2 acres, Carmel Woods Reservation 

173,751 sq. ft. land, Central Park 

(Richardson Field) 
6 1-2 acres Playstead 
Bandstand 

Andover Board Public Works — 
Pipe-lines and fountains 
Pumping-station and buildings 
Coal shed 

3 acres land 

20 acres Boston Ice Co. land 
2 reservoirs 

4 1-2 acres land 
Machinery and tools 
Stone-breaker and engine 

Amount carried forward 



S391150 00 



S17000 00 
800 00 



3500 


00 


150 


00 


3500 


00 


50 


00 


2500 


00 


50 


00 


2000 


00 


50 


00 


3000 


00 


500 


00 



248000 00 

42500 00 

700 00 

800 00 

2500 00 

16000 00 

2350 00 

1000 00 

2000 00 



17800 00 



3650 00 



3550 00 



2550 00 



2050 00 



3500 00 

3000 00 

3600 00 

15000 00 

5000 00 
1000 00 



S315850 00 451850 00 



86 



Amount brought forward 
Steam road roller 
Pump-house, east side N. Main St. 
3 sleds 
1 auto 
3 horses 

Carts and harnesses 
Sewer system 
Workshop, Lewis Street 
Barn and shed, Lewis Street 
47467 ft. land, Lewis Street 



Punchard School Fund 

Memorial Hall, Permanent Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Cornell 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Byers 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Edward Taylor 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Isaac E. Gid- 
dings Fund 

Memorial Hall Library and furniture 

Memorial Hall Library, Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance L'nion 

Memorial Hall Library, Phillips Fund 

Personal Property at Town Farm 
Motor Combination Chemical Truck 
Motor Combination Pump and Truck 
One Steam Fire Engine and apparatus 
Hook and Ladder Truck 
Two hose wagons 

Amount carried forward 



S315850 00 451850 00 

1000 00 

5000 00 

75 00 

300 00 

800 00 

200 00 

253000 00 

1600 00 

3000 00 

3000 00 

583825 00 



1035675 00 
76454 28 



S45000 00 

7700 00 

10000 00 

500 00 



3000 


00 


10000 


00 


100 


00 


3200 


00 




7Q^nn on 




/ 7JUu UU 

4274 00 




5300 00 




9000 00 




2800 00 




1000 00 




1000 00 




SI 215003 28 



87 



Amount brought forward 
Hose sled 
Four horses 
Hay scales 
Safes in Town House 
41J^ acres of land, Spring Grove Cem'y 
Receiving-tomb and tool-house 

Weights and measures 
Fire Alarm apparatus 
4000 ft. hose 



$1215003 28 




60 00 




1000 00 




350 00 




800 00 


$7500 00 




1500 00 






9000 00 






350 00 




4500 00 


t 


2000 00 


$1233063 28 



88 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of Assessors: 

I herewith hand you my report as Collector of Taxes for the 
year ending December 31, 1917. 

1914 

Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Street sprinkling 

Moth work 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected street sprinkling 

Collected moth work 

Collected interest 

Abated 

Error in warrant 



1915 



Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Street sprinkling 

Moth work 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected street sprinkling 

Collected moth work 

Collected interest 

Collected interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 



$2371 69 

62 68 

21 56 

70 91 

366 93 



$1938 37 

21 56 

70 91 

366 93 

491 60 

4 40 



$2893 


77 


$2893 77 




$ 


10377 74 

19 50 

36 90 

40 30 

626 66 


$ 6625 


46 




36 


90 




40 


30 




626 


66 




626 


66 




558 


66 




3213 


12 





$11101 10 $11101 10 



89 



1916 



Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Street sprinkling 

Moth work 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected street sprinkling 

Collected moth work 

Collected Interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 



1917 

Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Bay State St. R. R. Excise Tax 

Street sprinkling 

Moth work 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected street sprinkling 

Collected moth work 

Collected interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 

Uncollected Excise Tax 



$ 24066 78 
336 58 
196 62 
103 93 
477 10 



$ 13527 89 
196 62 
103 93 

477 10 

572 22 

10303 25 



$ 25181 01 $25181 01 

$164581 99 
72 34 
2279 45 
1621 34 
2379 15 
60 19 
$135167 97 
1621 34 
2379 15 
60 19 
306 38 
29179 98 
2279 45 

$170994 46 $170994 46 



SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 





Taxes 


Moth 
Work 


Street 
Sprinkling 


Interest 


Total 


1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 


$ 1938 37 

6625 46 

13527 89 

135167 97 


$ 70 91 

40 30 

103 93 

2379 15 


$ 21 56 

36 90 

196 92 

1621 34 


$ 366 93 

626 66 

477 10 

60 19 


$ 2397 77 

7329 32 

14305 54 

139228 65 




$157259 69 


S2594 29 


$1876 42 


$1530 88 


$163261 28 



JOHN W. BELL 

Collector of Taxes 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Liabilities 

Water Bonds, 4% (10000 due 1918) 
Water Bonds, 3J^% (3000 due 1918) 
Sewer Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1918) 
And'r Loan Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1918) 
High School Loan, 4% (6000 clue 1918) 

Assets 

Cash, General Fund 
Cash, Water Loan 
Cash, Sewer Loan 
Cash, High School Loan 
Cash, Sewer Assessments 

Uncollected taxes 
Street sprinkling 
Moth work 

Commonwealth, State Aid 

Commonwealth, pauper account 

Cities and Towns, pauper account 

Cities and Towns. Mothers' Aid 

Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 

Sewer Assessments 

Unpaid W T ater Rates of January 1 

Sinking Funds 

Unpaid St. Ry. Franchise and Excise Tax 

Balance against Town 



$112000 00 




47000 00 




105000 00 




15000 00 




105000 00 




$384000 00 


S 5648 10 




5026 59 




356 59 




1742 28 




5776 13 






18549 69 


42696 35 


464 64 




665 15 






43826 14 


1230 00 




119 70 




43 25 




144 67 




328 16 




9503 75 




6288 62 




58715 01 




3215 74 






79588 90 
242035 27 




$384000 00 



91 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 



Balance Jan. 1, 1917, General Fund 
Balance Jan. 1, 1917, High School Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1917, Water Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1917, Sewer Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1917, Abbott Village Sewer Ass'm't 
Balance Jan. 1, 1917, Water Bonds, premium 
Balance Jan. 1, 1917, Sewer Bonds, premium 
Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 

Bank Tax 

Income Tax 

reimbursement taxes on land 

Soldiers' exemption 

State Aid 

school tuition 

industrial schools 

Mothers' Aid 

hospitals for consumptives 

contagious diseases 

pauper account 

temporary aid 

Highway Com., Lowell Street 

Highway Com., Highway Dept. 

Highway Com., moth work 

hawkers' licenses 



Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonweal th 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 



Commonwealth 

Essex County, Lowell Street 

Essex County, dog tax 

Essex County, killing dogs 

Massachusetts Highway Commission, refund 

Andover National Bank, notes 

John W. Bell, Collector, taxes 

John W. Bell, Collector, interest on taxes 

John W. Bell, Collector, street sprinkling 

Amount carried forward 



$ 16755 


27 


69907 


63 


5026 


59 


2960 


15 


6504 


50 


50 


78 


151 


16 


20583 


16 


4866 


86 


31111 


49 


44 


29 


86 


30 


1141 


74 


316 


50 


74 


99 


266 


67 


25 


71 


45 


72 


19 


00 


147 


80 


2509 


21 


206 


56 


35 


63 


104 


00 


2480 


84 


625 


64 


42 


00 


3 


00 


80000 


00 


157259 


69 


1530 


88 


1876 42 


$406760 18 



92 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 



Orders paid 
Schools 

Highway Department 
Lowell Street 
Park Department 
Street Lighting 
Police 

Fire Department 
Brush Fires 

Printing and Stationery 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous 
Town House 
Town Officers 
Spring Grove Cemetery 
Board of Health 
Moth Work 
Tree Warden 
Public Dump 
Hay Scales 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 
Memorial Day 

Special G. A. R. appropriation 
Memorial Hall Library 
Memorial Hall Library, dog tax 
Almshouse Expenses 
Almshouse Repairs 
Relief out of Almshouse 
Soldiers' Relief 
State Aid 
Mothers' Aid 
Retirement of Veterans 

Amount carried forward 



$ 53710 90 
44693 58 
7442 51 
1279 06 
6187 24 
4997 00 
10564 41 

219 00 
1194 62 
3390 68 
1433 31 
1569 46 
6645 86 
3600 88 
1493 81 
5903 30 

671 53 
75 00 

100 00 
17592 33 

350 00 

100 00 
1800 00 

625 64 
5381 04 

233 50 
4247 31 
1039 25 
1230 00 

953 50 

300 00 

$189024 72 



93 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 



A mount brought forward 
John W. Bell, Collector, moth work 
John W. Bell, Collector, interest on deposits 
Board of Public Works, water rates 
Board of Public Works, service pipe 
C. J. Stone, Trial Justice, fines 
N. P. Frye, Trial Justice, fines 
Almshouse, F. A. Swanton, Supt. 
Spring Grove Cemetery, sale and care of lots 
Town Hall rents 

School Dept., tuition and supplies 
Cities and Towns, pauper account 
Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 
Hay Scales 

Fire Dept., use of horses 
Fire Dept., rent of shed 
Highway Dept., labor and supplies 
Highway Dept., sidewalk assessments 
W. H. Crowley, sealer's fees 
George A. Higgins, Town Clerk, fees 
Liquor Licenses 

Board of Health, slaughter licenses 
Board of Health, garbage licenses 
F. H. Stacey, milk licenses 
J. H. Playdon, moth supplies 
Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale, rents 
Andover Nat'l Bank, interest on deposits 
Andover Nat'l Bank, interest on High School Loan 
Sewer Dept., house connections 
Sewer Dept., assessments 
Sewer Dept., interest on assessments 
High School Bonds, 101-110 

Amount carried forward 



S406760 


18 


2594 


29 


134 


81 


24780 


82 


1542 


86 


143 


90 


15 


00 


1087 


60 


1111 


04 


433 


00 


825 


58 


445 


47 


152 


00 


83 


25 


1118 


30 


50 


00 


985 


86 


1702 


19 


47 


50 


189 


00 


3 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


12 


00 


69 


65 


136 


50 


1009 


28 


1330 


30 


3349 


49 


6377 


55 


198 


64 


10000 


00 


$466695 


06 



94 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward 
Redemption 13 Water Bonds 
Redemption 5 Andover Loan Act Bonds 
Redemption 5 Sewer Bonds 
Redemption, 5 High School Bonds 
Water Department 
Sewer Department 

Sewer Dept., premium for redemption of bonds 
Water Dept., premium for redemption of bonds 
Sewer Assessment for redemption of bonds 
Sewer Sinking Funds 
Water Sinking Funds 

Treasurer Sinking Funds, sewer assessments 
Sewer House connections, refunds 
New High School' 
High School Loan, premium for redemption of 

bonds 2138 11 

Old Colony Trust Co., certification of High School 

Bonds 75 00 

County Tax 15632 36 

Commonwealth, State Tax 22000 00 

Commonwealth, Bank Tax 1935 56 

Commonwealth, Highway Tax 2535 00 

Andover National Bank Notes 80000 00 



S189024 72 

13000 00 

5000 00 

5000 00 

5000 00 

16002 48 

13314 34 

151 16 

50 78 

4848 84 

1000 00 

750 00 

1240 01 

153 01 

77294 67 



Total expenditures 
Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1918 
General Fund 
High School Loan 
Water Loan 
Sewer Loan 
Abbott Village Sewer Assessments 



456146 04 

S5648 10 

1742 28 

5026 59 

356 59 

5776 13 

S474695 73 



95 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas.,in account with the Town of Andover 

Dr. 

Amount brought forward 
High School Bonds, interest 
H. F. Marland, reimbursement Board of Health 
Postofnce, redemption of keys 

Scientific Equipment Co., refund High School Loan 
Tree Warden Dept., sale of wood 
Phillips Academy, street lighting 
Water Loan, premium for redemption of bonds 
Sewer Loan, premium for redemption of bonds 
High School Loan, premium for redemption of bonds 
Sewer Dept., assessments for redemption of bonds 

Total receipts 



$466695 06 


11 


11 


18 


00 




40 


1 


02 


551 


25 


230 


00 


50 


78 


151 


16 


i 2138 


11 


s 4848 


84 


$474695 


73 



Richardson Fund — Frye Village School 

Dr. 

Balance January 1, 1917 $1168 88 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 47 20 



$1216 08 



Cr. 



Edward E. Babb & Co. 


9 17 




Mary B. Smith 


3 50 




Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 


1203 41 


1216 08 



96 



Draper Fund 

Dr. 

Balance January 1, 1917 1167 01 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 47 14 



Cr. 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1214 15 



Edward Taylor Fund 

Dr. 



Balance January 1, 1917 
Andover Savings Bank, interest 

Cr. 

Deposit Andover Savings Bank 



Varnum Lincoln Spelling Match 

Dr. 

Balance January 1, 1917 521 48 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 20 24 



Cr. 



H. C. Sanborn, Supt. of Schools 20 00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 521 72 



97 



1214 15 



1214 15 



238 59 




9 62 






248 21 


248 21 




248 21 



541 72 



541 72 



Isaac E. Giddings Burial Ground Fund 



Dr. 



Balance January 1, 1917 
Andover Savings Bank, interest 



Cr. 



F. L. Brigham, Treas. South Cemetery 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 



Cemetery Funds 



Dr. 



S1000 00 
40 40 



40 40 
1000 00 



1040 40 



1040 40 



Balance January 1, 1917 
Andover Savings Bank, interest 
Deposits for perpetual care 
Andover National Bank Stock 
Andover National Bank dividends 
Cash 



17137 86 




712 78 




1650 00 




200 00 




12 00 




56 00 






19768 64 



Cr. 

Paid for care of lots 

Deposits, Andover Savings Bank 

Andover National Bank Stock 

Cash 



S 625 00 

18883 64 

200 00 

60 00 



19768 64 



98 



CORNELL FUND 



Receipts 



Amount of Fund 
Deposited in Savings Banks 
Balance from last account 
Income 



$ 68 47 
207 50 



Expenditures 




Paid for coal and wood 


$233 33 


Balance on hand 


42 64 



vS5000 00 
5000 00 



275 97 



275 97 



W. D. WALKER 
C. N. MARLAND 
JOHN C. ANGUS 



Trustees 



99 



AUDIROTS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several town officers 
and find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all 
payments. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand : 

General Fund $5648 10 

High School Loan 1742 28 

Water Loan 5026 59 

Sewer Loan 356 59 

Abbott Village Sewer Assessments 5776 13 



$18549 69 
NESBIT G. GLEASON 
JOHN S. ROBERTSON 
WALTER H. COLEMAN 

Auditors 



100 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 

COMMITTEE 



The Finance Committee has examined with great care all the 
requests for appropriations. We are impressed with the con- 
stantly rising market in both labor and materials. Bearing in 
mind, in addition, the probability of a serious increase in the 
State Tax, the committee has given its approval only to such 
appropriations as are absolutely needed in the conduct of the 
several town departments. With one exception, as noted, the 
conclusions of the Committee are unanimous. 

The following is a list of appropriations recommended by the 
committee for 1918: 

Almshouse expenses S 4500 00 

Almshouse repairs 300 00 

Relief out of Almshouse 4300 00 

Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 500 00 

Board of Health 1500 00 

(In view of the fact that this Board returned over 
$500.00 unexpended balance to the Town in 1917, the 
amount recommended is deemed sufficient.) 
Brush Fires 600 00 

Fire Department 9400 00 

Hay Scales 125 00 

Highway Department, sidewalks, snow 25000 00 

(It is estimated by the Board of Public Works that the 
sum recommended is sufficient for maintenance. The 
committee is of the opinion that no sum should be ap- 
propriated this year beyond that required for mainten- 
ance ; and that economy may be wisely effected now by 
deferring new construction. It should be noted that this 
recommendation is not unanimous, two votes being re- 
corded against the recommendation and in favor of the 
amount requested by the Board of Public Works.) 



Amount carried forward S46225 00 

101 



Amount brought forward $46225 00 

Insurance 2000 00 

Insurance (Workmen's Compensation) 1600 00 

Interest 17000 00 

Memorial Hall Library 1800 00 

Memorial Day 350 00 

Post 99, G. A. R. 100 00 

Miscellaneous 3000 00 

(As this is the only contingent fund to meet any emer- 
gency that may arise, without calling a special town 
meeting, the committee is of the opinion that this sum 
should be available.) 
Parks and Playsteads 1500 00 

Police 5500 00 

(As all employees of the town have received advances in 
wages, the Police, in the judgment of the committee, 
should receive the moderate increase which this recom- 
mendation provides.) 
Printing and Stationery 1400 00 

Public Dump 75 00 

Retirement of Veterans, Acts 1912 300 00 

Redemption of Water Bonds 13000 00 

Redemption Punchard School Bonds 6000 00 

Redemption Andover Loan Act Bonds 5000 00 

Schools and Receipts 60000 00 

(The increase in the recommendation over last year's 
appropriation is due to the increase in teachers' wages — 
now low — the advance in the cost of fuel and greater 
amount used ; the addition of a building to the plant 
with consequent additional cost of operation, together 
with the advance in the upkeep of every nature. We 
are advised by the School Committee that no extraor- 
dinary alterations or repairs are planned, and that the 
appropriation is to be used solely to maintain the 
schools at their present standard.) 



Amount carried forward $164850 00 

102 



Amount brought forwaid $164850 00 

Sewer Department Maintenance 2500 00 

Sewer Department Sinking Fund 1000 00 

Soldiers' Relief 1100 00 

(The committee feels that cause for increase is well 
understood and that any comment is not necessary.) 

Spring Grove Cemetery 2500 00 

(And receipts from sale of lots) 

State Aid 2500 00 

(The amount expended under this item is fully refunded 
by the State,) 

Street Lighting 6500 00 

Town Officers 6900 00 

(This increase is to provide for the payment by the 
Town of the bonds of the Town Treasurer and Tax 
Collector.) 

Town House 3000 00 

(The town has been ordered by the State Board of 
Health to make material alterations in the provision 
for confining prisoners in the Police Station. The cells 
must be brought from the basement to the first floor. 
A cell must be provided for women, and improved sani- 
tary conditions must be made.) 

Tree Warden, Gypsy and Brown tail Moth Dept. 3500 00 

(The bulk of the amount recommended — $3100 — is 
decreed by the State Forester ; the balance is for the use 
of the Tree Warden.) 

Water Department 

Maintenance 15000 00 

(The increase in maintenance is due to the general 
advance in labor and materials; necessary repairs upon 
the pumping equipment and additional labor and power 
required to carry out the contract with Lawrence by 
which that citv is now furnished with water. The 



Amount carried forward $209350 00 

103 



Amount brought forward $209350 00 

money received from Lawrence, under this contract, 
more than offsets the amount expended and reverts to 
the Town Treasury.) 
Construction 1800 00 

Sinking Fund 750 00 



Total 



$2 11900 00 



The Finance Committee is also required to make recommenda- 
tions to the voters concerning all articles in the Town Warrant 
involving the expenditure of money. The Committee, therefore, 
makes the following recommendations: — 

Article 4. Not approved. (The expenditure of so large a sum as 
will be required to carry out the provision of this 
article estimated by the Board of Public Works, 
some S 20, 000, is deemed wholly inadvisable this 
year.) 
Article 5. Referred to the Lighting Committee. 
Article 6. Approved. (This work has been ordered by the State 

Board of Health.) 
Article 7. Approved. (This appropriation provides for the in- 
stallation of a single-unit electric pump. When it is 
realized that our high pressure sytsem depends upon 
a single oil engine, the need of an emergency pump is 
obvious. Without such emergency pump, in the 
event of a breakdown to the oil engine, the high 
pressure system would be useless.) 
Article 8. Not approved. (The approval of Article 7 auto- 
matically effects the disapproval of Article 8.) 
Article 9. Not approved. (As we are advised that Essex Street 
is a County road, the Committee suggests that the 
Town instruct the selectmen to petition the County 
Commissioners to lay out the portion of Essex Street 
involved, in order that the purpose desired may be 



104 



obtained. The cost will, under this plan, be appor- 
tioned between the County and Town.) 

Article 10. Approved. (The recommendation provides for 
carrying out an understanding between the State, 
County and Town, by which each interest should 
contribute an equal amount each year for this work 
until completed.) 

Article 11. Not approved. (The Committee heartily approves 
the purpose of this Article, but for the reason that the 
method proposed is illegal, approval must be with- 
held. The abatement of taxes is placed by the 
statute in the hands of the assessors, with which 
officials the Committee feels the situation may be 
safely intrusted.) 
Article 14. Not approved, in present form. The following is sug- 
gested : 
To see if the Town will vote to amend its By-Laws by inserting 
under Article 4 thereof, sections to be numbered 12, 13, 14. 
Section 12. — The selectmen may, as provided by 
Chapter 102 of the Revised Laws of Massachusetts and 
amendments thereto, license suitable persons to be junk 
collectors, to collect, by purchase or otherwise, junk, 
old metals, and second-hand articles from place to place 
within the limits of the town of Andover, and may revoke 
such licenses at pleasure, and any place, vehicle or re- 
ceptacle used for the collection or keeping of the articles 
aforesaid may be examined at all times by the selectmen, 
or by any person by them authorized so to do. 

Section 13. — A license for the collection of junk shall 
not be granted to any person who is not a citizen of the 
United States unless such person shall have declared his 
intention to become a citizen of the United States. 

Section 14. — A license shall be granted and issued only 
to such persons as have resided in the town of Andover 
for one year next preceding the date of application. 

A license fee of not less than five dollars (S5.00) must 

105 



be paid to the Town Clerk at the time of making appli- 
cation for such license, and in the event that the license is 
not granted, the Town Clerk shall refund to the appli- 
cant the amount deposited. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY M. EAMES 
SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL 
GEORGE ABBOT 
CHESTER W. HOLLAND 
JOHN H. CAMPION 
WALTER M. LAMONT 
FREDERIC G. MOORE 
HENRY W. BARNARD 
BARNETT ROGERS 

Finance Committee 



106 



HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 

REPORT OF SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



After several years of planning and discussion, it was decided, 
at the town meeting of March 1916, to provide for the building 
of a new high school ; the vote passed was as follows : 

1. 

That the town raise and appropriate the sum of one hundred 
thousand dollars ($100,000.00) for the purpose of building and 
equipping a new high school building to be located on land in 
front of the present Punchard School building; to make any 
changes deemed necessary to preserve and use the present 
Punchard School building; and to make any necessary changes in 
the central heating plant and its connections. 

2. 

That for the purpose of building and equipping said new high 
school building the town treasurer is hereby authorized to issue 
and sell bonds of the town to an amount not exceeding $100,000, 
dated October 1, 1916, and payable $5000 thereof on the first of 
October in each of the years 1917-1936 inclusive, bearing interest 
at a rate not exceeding 4 per cent per annum payable semi- 
annually. The said bonds shall be denominated on their face 
Andover High School Loan 1916. 

3. 
That the moderator appoint a committee of five in number to 
be known as the High School Building Committee, said committee 
to be authorized and instructed to obtain plans, make contracts, 
approve payments, and to do and act as may be necessary and 
proper to carry out all provisions of the foregoing vote. 

4. 

That the committee to whom is entrusted the construction 
of the new high school building may defer action if, upon consid- 

107 



-eration of plans and figures, they deem it wise to do so. 

The moderator, Mr. Alfred L. Ripley, appointed Messrs. 
Burton S. Flagg, Henry A. Bodwell, John Alden, Harry M. 
Eames, and Edward V. French, as the Building Committee. 
The committee started at once upon its work; Mr. Flagg was 
elected chairman, and Mr. Bodwell, clerk. Mr. Alden attended 
the first few meetings and then illness prevented his further ac- 
tivity, and his death following soon after, deprived the town of 
the services of a man who had keen interest in the problem, and 
who would have been delighted to give his thought and experience 
to the work. The committee deeply regretted his loss. In the 
beginning the committee asked Mr. N. C. Hamblin to sit with 
them, that his special knowledge of high school conditions from 
his experience as principal might be available. After the action 
of the special town meeting in June 1916, providing for the filling 
of vacancies, the moderator appointed Mr. Hamblin to the com- 
mittee, to fill the place left vacant by the death of Mr. Alden. 

After a careful investigation, the committee selected Messrs. 
Fisher, Ripley and LeBoutillier of Boston, as architects for the 
new work. Their services have proved most satisfactory, and Mr. 
LeBoutillier by his residence in the town, has been able to give 
the work much closer supervision than would ordinarily be 
possible. Messrs. French and Hubbard of Boston, were chosen as 
engineers for the heating work, and they have handled their 
part of the planning and supervision to the full satisfaction of the 
committee. 

The first step was a study of general high school conditions and 
tendencies, so that the building planned would represent the best 
thought in high school w r ork, fitted to the peculiar needs of An- 
dover. Representatives of the State Board of Education came to 
Andover at our request, and gave many helpful suggestions from 
their broad experience, and answered such questions as had arisen 
regarding our own problem. The committee then visited a num- 
ber of modern high school buildings, and thereby obtained many 
valuable ideas, both as to features which were desirable, and 
things which should be avoided. The first question before plans 
could be started, was as to the number of scholars likely to seek 

108 



high school training in the next ten or fifteen years. Considering 
the number of scholars now in the high school, the rate of growth 
in recent years, and the tendency of a larger percentage of gram- 
mar school pupils everywhere to seek high school education, it 
seemed clear that any building now constructed should provide 
for not less than 400 scholars. This was a third larger number 
than had been considered in previous plans, but even with full 
allowance for the special factors in Andover, due to other schools,, 
it appeared certain that it would be unwise to build a new high 
school for less than 400 pupils. 

With this foundation, work upon the actual plans was started 
and pushed vigorously It was felt that the new building and the 
old should form one unit. This was what the town evidently 
desired and was what efficiency and economy required if the old 
building was to be retained. After some study, it was found that 
this could all be accomplished, and a plan developed which would 
make full use of both buildings. 

The plan adopted provides a new building of simple and sub- 
stantial construction, designed to be a convenient and efficient 
workshop for the various activities which must be carried on in 
any modern high school. The building is so planned that it can 
be extended later, by the addition of wings, and still be attractive 
and convenient. Punchard hall, slightly altered and re-decorated,, 
will be used for all assembly purposes, and the ell furnishes an 
excellent room for the manual training work. The remainder 
of the old building can be refitted to meet such future needs as 
may arise. 

On the completion of the plans and specifications for the new 
building, bids were obtained from a number of contractors. As 
usual in such work, the first bid brought the total cost above 
S 100,000 available. The committee felt that the building must 
be constructed within the appropriation. The plans were again 
studied to see where still further savings could be made, and 
were somewhat modified by omitting a number of desirable but 
not absolutely essential things. Several of the lowest bidders 
then refigured the work with the result that the cost was brought 
within the appropriation. The general contract was awarded to> 

109 



the J. H. Mendell Engineering and Construction Company of 
Manchester, N. H., who gave the lowest final figures. The heat- 
ing work was given to Bride Grimes & Co. of Lawrence, Mass., 
and the new boilers to Wright Stafford & Son, also of Lawrence. 
Excavation work started in August 1916 and was pushed ener- 
getically. The contractors worked together harmoniously, and 
each performed his work in a most satisfactory manner. The 
new building was practically completed in September 1917, and 
the high school sessions opened in it on time. 

New Building 

The walls, including all the main partitions, were built of 
strong hollow interlocking tile, and the exterior walls were faced 
with brick. The trimmings are of substantial concrete stone. 
The main ventilating flues are of tile or brick, carried through the 
roof and covered with concrete caps. The roof is of the flat type 




VIEW FROM PUNCHARD AVENUE 

draining to interior conductors, and carried over the parapet wall 
so that extensive flashings were unnecessary. The roof covering 
is of tar and gravel which long experience has proved most 
reliable and durable. The aim was to obtain reliable construction 
which would be as free as possible from the need of repairs. The 
exterior is plain ; our funds did not permit much decoration. Care- 
ful study was given that the proportions and general lines should 

110 



be good, and the structure substantial and dignified. When the 
harshness of any new work is softened by time and the general 
setting* relieved of its present barrenness by a few shrubs and 
vines, a high school building in keeping with the needs of Andover 
and with the simplicity and utility for which Andover stands, 
will be found to have been secured. 

The use of tile for all main walls permitted the interior plaster- 

TTff 



I _ . ri u h u 
l :] d n n d n n 

5 Manual Troinmo - 

I]DDDnD 






Library 



l— . ' 



Sup'of-I School 
Jtfioda *■! Commit tee 



tr 



: 



Rccilahon Room 



Clasi Koopi 



First Floor 



111 



ing to be directly upon the tiles, thus making furring and lathing 
unnecessary, and avoiding the hollow flues running from bottom 
to top of the building which are common in all ordinary construc- 
tion, and through which fire can spread readily. The tile parti- 





5ecoad Floor 
tions give further excellent fire cut-offs. Cost prevented making 
the floors and roof of incombustible construction. Heavy hard- 
pine joists were therefore used, but all the plastering on ceilings and 
minor partitions was done on metal lathing. The space betweenthe 



112 



top-story ceiling and the roof which is necessary for insulation 
against heat and cold, and which in many public buildings is a 
bad fire-trap, is sub-divided by incombustible partitions, so that 
any fire could spread but slowly, with every chance that it could 
be controlled within narrow limits. A wide corridor runs length- 
wise of the building, with an easy stairway at each end, the stair- 
ways being separated from the corridor in each story by a sub- 
stantial partition of wood and wire glass. Such partitions keep 
smoke out of the stairways in case of fire, and hold fire back until 
there is ample time for everyone to get out of the building. 

In alt work, the many rules of the State governing schoolhouse 
construction have been followed exactly. These specify the 
amount of window area required, the width of corridors and stair- 
ways, the amount of air which must be provided for each'room, 
and many other similar details. The class rooms are all good and 
there are no waste spaces. 

There are twelve class rooms, varying in size to meet the needs 
of different classes for study and recitation. There are also two 
science laboratories, a lecture room, a typewriting room and 
ample storage closets for apparatus, books and supplies. An 
attractive library opens from one of the large study rooms, so 
that scholars may learn the use and value of good books. In 
addition to the high school needs, rooms are provided for the 
Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee. 

In the basement ample and light coat and toilet rooms are 
provided, also a room for domestic science work, and a good 
lunch room. 

The coloring of finish and walls throughout has been kept in 
harmonious and pleasing shades. The result is a thoroughly at- 
tractive and convenient interior. 

Fire protection has been provided by two standpipes with 
small hose equipment in the corridors of the new building, and by 
chemical extinguishers and fire pails in the old building. We 
desired to provide some automatic sprinklers but costs prevented. 

Heating Plant 

It was possible to enlarge the present central plant or to put 
boilers into the new building After study, it was found best for 

113 




Base>\e>nt Plan 

economy in handling and general safety, to enlarge the present 
plant, and two new boilers were added. More chimney capacity 
was developed and a thoroughly good and convenient plant 
with four boilers was established. A new 8-inch steam pipe was 
laid from this plant for heating both the new and the old high 
school buildings. The ventilation required by law is often se- 
cured by the use of a fan, but after studying the various possible 
arrangements, a simple gravity system with the heating coils in 
the ventilating stacks was adopted, thus making a fan unneces- 
sary. The use of low pressure steam was continued which worked 
well with the heating arrangements of the older grade schools. 
The heating plant has done its work well so far, and with the few 
adjustments necessary in putting any new system into opera- 
tion it will undoubtedly give entire satisfaction, and prove an 
easily handled and economical heating equipment. 
The Old Punchard Building 

The committee felt that the one vital point was to get a new 
building of the size and arrangement which the high school work 
of the town so greatly needed. Only the most careful planning 
permitted doing this within the $100,000 available. To do 
less would hamper future development and prove a bad invest- 



114 



ment. The retention of the old building and the use of the 
hall and of the ell for manual training made this possible, but the 
inevitable result was that some improvements in the old building 
which were desirable, though not absolutely essential, could not be 
made. These conditions were presented to the town meeting in 
March 1917, and a special appropriation of $10,000 was then 
made so that the desirable work on the old building which could 
be done most advantageously in connection with the new work 
could be undertaken at once, and the vote passed was as follows: 

That the town raise and appropriate the sum of $10,000 and 
authorize the High School Building committee to expend the 
same to build a passageway between the old and new Punchard 
buildings and to make improvements on the old Punchard build- 
ing and to provide additional equipment. 

That for the purpose of building a passageway between the old 
and new Punchard buildings and providing additional equip- 
ment : — the town treasurer is hereby authorized to issue and sell 
bonds of the town to an amount not exceeding $10,000, dated 
August 1st, 1917, and payable $1000 thereof on the 1st of 
August in each of the years 1918-1927 inclusive, bearing interest 
at a rate not exceeding 4% per annum payable semi-annually. 
The said bonds shall be denominated on their face Andover High 
School Loan 1917. 

The passageway connecting the new and the old buildings was 
built, some changes in the hall were made, a new floor laid, toilet 
rooms provided, and all repainted. A substantial brick stair- 
tower as a second exit was provided, as the law required. The 
east wing was converted into a workshop for manual training. 
The gable roof over the main stairs which somewhat obstructed 
the light in the new building was removed, and a few other minor 
changes made. The floor plans show how the new and the old 
buildings are now connected and made to work together as a 
unit. 

In carrying out these plans our studies showed that in the future 
an excellent gymnasium could be made by throwing the first 
floor and the basement of the old building into one high room, 

115 




X 
H 
D 
O 

UJ 

X 
H 

O 

O 
2 

O 

o 

w 



116 




117 



the hall being supported on steel girders. This or other possible 
uses may be determined upon as the future demands. 

COSTS 
The main items of receipts and expenditures are as follows: 

Funds 

Appropriation. March 1916 S100000 00 

Appropriation, March 1917 10000 00 

Interest on bank balance to Dec. 31, 1917 1763 84 



S111763 84 



Expenditures 

New Building 

General Contract, Mendell Eng. & Const. Co. S73376 00 

Extras less deduction, Mendell Eng. & Const. Co. 834 19 
Blasting and extra foundations, Mendell Eng. & Const. 

Co. 801 57 

Heating and ventilating. Bride, Grimes & Co. 8182 00 
Enlarging central heating plant, Bride. Grimes & Co. 5874 00 

New boilers, Wright Stafford & Sons 2000 00 

Architects' fees (both buildings) 5541 90 

Engineers' fees and expenses 1278 46 

Furnishings and equipment 4382 98 

Miscellaneous 477 10 

Old Building 

Passageway 1560 00 

New stair tower for fire escape 1960 00 

Remodeling 5126 28 



Total SI 11394 48 

The option given in the original vote to delay building if the 
committee deemed it wise was given very careful consideration. 
After reviewing the subject from all directions and getting the 
best possible light on probable future developments, the com- 

118 



mittee were unanimously of the opinion that the new building 
should not be delayed. Later developments have shown that this 
was a wise conclusion. The town needed the building and there 
no prospects of better prices. As a matter of fact, all costs have 
advanced sharply since our contracts were made in 1916. We 
believe the town has obtained good values for the money 
expended. 
The Future 

The present plant has room for considerable growth of the 
high school, but it was felt that a long look should be taken into 
the future, and all plans of to-day are such that the plant could 
be enlarged in 10 or 15 years from now if this was found necessary. 
Our plan provides for the construction of wings which would take 
care of about 120 additional pupils, bringing the total capacity 
of the high school plant up to 520. The cut on page 117 shows 
the ground plan as it would be if such additions were made. 

The plant as it stands is ready for use \vith all the essentials 
provided, but as stated there is some further work which can be 
done to advantage. Some of this may be met by the gifts of 
classes and by the action of patriotic townsmen who would 
like to add something to the simple essentials. Shower-baths 
can be provided later, and space and connections for them have 
been left in the toilet rooms. A few shrubs, vines, and trees would 
help the general appearance of the grounds. Automatic sprink- 
lers in the manual training room and at a few other points are 
desirable, and the water connections have been provided so 
that these can be put in easily. It is believed that all these 
things and a few others of similar nature will be provided in due 
time. 



The committee has held sixty-two regular meetings in addition 
to the trips to other high schools and to much time spent in 
supervising the construction work. The work of the committee 
has gone on with entire harmony and unanimous agreement on 
all points, and there has been no expense to the town for any of the 
work done by the committee. Our relations with contractors. 

119 



architects, and engineers have been most pleasant. The work as 
a whole has proved an interesting, even if at times an arduous 
service for the town. 

BURTON S. FLAGG 
HENRY A. BODWELL 
N. C. HAMBLIN 
HARRY M. EAMES 
EDWARD V. FRENCH 

Committee. 



120 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss. : To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover. Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the fourth day of March, 1918, 
at six o'clock a.m., to act on the following articles: — 

Article 1.— To choose a Moderator for one year. Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, 
one member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three mem- 
bers of the School Committee for three years, two members of 
the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the 
Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for 
one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year, one 
Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, one Trustee of Cornell 
Fund for one year (to fill vacancy), two Trustees of Spring Grove 
Cemetery for one year (to fill vacancies), Fence Viewers, Pound 
Keeper, and any other officers the town may determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 
Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, 
Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 
Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, Parks 

121 



and Playsteads. Police, Printing and Stationery. Public Dump. 
Retirement of Veterans. Redemption of Water. Sewer, High 
School, and Andover Loan Act Bonds. Schools, Sewer Main- 
tenance. Sewer Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove 
Cemetery, State Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town 
House, Tree Warden, Moth Department. Water Maintenance, 
Construction and Sinking Funds, and other town charges and 
expenses. 

Article 1. — To see if the town will vote to extend the Water 
System from its present terminal on Lowell Street a distance of 
5600 feet to Brown Street, then 3900 feet on Brown Street, on 
petition of Charles W. Livingston and others, and appropriate 
the sum necessary for same. 

Article 5. — To see if the town will vote to place an electric 
light on Lincoln Street between Fred McCollum's and James 
Magee's and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of 
Arthur O'Hara and others. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000 for additions to the filter-beds, as ordered by the State 
Board of Health, on petition of the Board of Public Work> 

Article 7. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
S2500 for the purpose of installing a 5-inch double suction pump, 
together with a 30-horsepower motor, and accessories, in the 
Pump Station on Bancroft Road, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article S. — To see if the town will affirm its vote at the annual 
meeting of 1917. whereby it appropriated $4000 for the con- 
struction cf a two-unit pumping plant within the reservoir circle 
off Bancroft Road and appropriate an additional sum of S1000 
to be added to the unexpended balance of the S4000 appropriated ; 
also to grant the Board of Public Works a sufficient sum from the 
Water Bonds, necessary "o extend the water-main from the 
proposed pumping plant to a point near the present pumping 
plant on Bancroft Road, on petition cf T. E. Rhodes and other- 
Article 9. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
; 00 for widening Essex Street Bridge over Shawsheen River. 

122 



on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money not exceeding S5000, to continue the macadam on Lowell 
Street; the same to equal an amount which the State and County 
will severally appropiiate, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 11. — To see if the Town will vote that citizens of the 
town in the National War Service and those hereafter engaged in 
the service shall be assessed for, but shall be exempt during the 
war, from paying a polltax, upon petition of Fred G. Cheney 
and others. 

Article 12. — To see if the Town will grant the use of the En- 
gine House Hall in Ballard Vale to the Ballard Vale Village Im- 
provement Society, and appropriate a sum of money sufficient 
to put it in proper condition for use for public gatherings, on 
petition of William Shaw and others. 

Article 13. — To act on any amendments to the Building Laws 
passed at the Annual Town Meeting of 1917, which may be 
offered by the Committee to meet the requirements of the At- 
torney General. 

Article 14.— To see if the Town will vote to amend its By-Law > 
by inserting under Article 4 thereof sections to be numbered 12,. 
13 and 14. 

Section 12. — The Selectmen may, as provided by 
Chapter 102 of the Revised Laws of Massachusetts and 
amendments thereto, license suitable persons to be 
junk collectors, to collect, by purchase or otherwise, 
junk, old metals, and second-hand articles from place 
to place within the limits of the Town of Andover and 
may revoke such license? at pleasure, and any place, 
vehicle or receptacle used for the collection or keeping 
of the articles aforesaid may be examined at all times 

by the Selectmen, or by any person by them authorized 
so to do. 

Section 13. — A license for the collection of junk shall 
not be granted to any person who is not a citizen of the 

123 



United States unless such person shall have declared 
his intention to become a citizen of the United States. 
Section 14. — A license shall be granted and issued 
only to such persons as have resided in the town of 
Andover for one year next preceding the date of appli- 
cation. 

A license fee of not less than five (S5.00) dollars 
must be paid to the Town Clerk at the time of making 
application for such license, and in the event that the 
license is not granted the Town Clerk shall refund to 
the applicant the amount deposited. 
Article 15. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year. 
Article 16. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 17. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the cur- 
rent financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 18. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 19. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 
Article 20.— To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 21. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock a.m., and may be closed at 
2 o'clock P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested' 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting, as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this sixteenth day of February. A.D. 
1918. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



124 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



REV. E. VICTOR BIGELOW MYROX E. GUTTERSOX 

SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL REV. C. W. HEXRY 

REV. NEWMAN MATTHEWS FRANK T. CARLTOX 

HARRY M. EAMES HARRY H. XOYES 

Trustees 



125 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



PRINCIPAL FUND 
January 1, 1917 
Cash in bank 
Real estate, mortgages and bonds 



December 31, 1917 
Cash in bank 
Real estate, mortgages and bonds 

January 1, 1917 
Cash in bank 
Mortgages paid during year 

December 31, 1917 
Cash in bank 
Investment in new mortgages 

INCOME 
January 1. 1917 
Cash in bank 
Interest on mortgages and bonds 

EXPENDITURE- 

N. C. Hamblin, Principal 
Edna G. Chapin, instructor 
Helen DeM. Dunn, instructor 
Percival M. Symonds, instructor 
Ruth R. Hamblin, instructor 
Sarah B. Codding, instructor 
Andover National Bank, box rent 
Rogers & Angus, insurance 
Smart & Flagg, insurance 
Harrv H. Noyes. treasurer 
City of Boston 
Expense 

Henry Wardworth, legal advice 
Cash on hand 



S 4334 97 






72119 31 








S76454 


28 


4605 77 






71848 51 








76454 


28 




4334 97 






3570 80 








7905 


77 




4605 77 






3300 00 








7905 


77 




1659 52 






3729 60 








5389 


12 


c 


800 00 






1050 00 






995 00 






685 00 






300 00 






75 68 






5 00 






25 00 






10 00 






200 00 






3 50 






8 42 






15 00 






1216 52 






S 


5389 


12 



BARNARD FUND 

January 1, 1917 
Cash in bank 
Dividends. 



Prizes awarded 

First — Gertrude Louise Lombard 
Second — Margaret F. HinchclifTe 
Third — William R. Brewster 

December 31, 1917, Cash in bank 



DRAPER FUND 

January 1, 1917 

Cash in bank 1416 56 

Dividends 55 60 



$ 25 50 




40 00 






$ 65 50 




20 00 




12 00 




8 00 




25 50 


^s sn 



A. T. Thompson, scientific apparatus 


180 00 


Scholarship 


40 00 


Scholarship 


40 00 


December 31, 1917, Cash in bank 


1212 16 


GOLDSMITH FUND 




January 1, 1917, Cash in bank 


252 18 


Dividends 


10 18 


Prizes awarded 




Girl's prize — Helen C. Higgins 


5 00 


Boy's prize — Harry Roland Payne 


5 00 


December 31, 1917, Cash on hand 


252 36 



1472 16 



1472 16 



262 36 



262 36 
HARRY H. NOYES, Treasurer 



127 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The trustees of the Memorial Hall Library submit herewith 
their annual report to the town for the year 1917. 

An adequate statement of the activities of the library may be 
found in the reports of the treasurer and the librarian which fol- 
low. 

The ministry of books has never been more important than it 
is to-day. Not only are those volumes which relate to the war, 
its causes, its phenomena, its psychology and its economics in 
constant demand but as the realities of the great struggle come 
closer to our people an increasing solace is being found in the 
books which have been proved to contain enduring messages. 
This is shown to a remarkable degree by the list of books read by 
men at the front, and by the demands of our stay-at-home bor- 
rowers. The library is meeting these requests to the extent of 
its equipment. It has been the agent of the people of Andover in 
rendering a service to the camp libraries out of all proportion to 
the size of our town. Nor is the work of the library staff confined 
to supplying the wants of those who seek information; by dis- 
playing books, pamphlets and bulletins w r here all who come 
may see, they have suggested the study of the important ways in 
which the individual can render his due of patriotic service. A 

128 



public library's value is never to be measured by quantitative 
standards, but the reality of its service is greater to-day than 
ever before. 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
GEORGE F. SMITH 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
BURTON S. FLAGG 
WILLIAM H. RYDER 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 

Trustees 



129 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
In account with the Town of ANDOVER, MASS. 

RECEIPTS 



Balance from last year 


S2451.08 


Town Appropriation 


1800.00 


Dog Tax 


625.64 


Income from Investments 


3094.81 


Fines 


147.96 


War Library Fund 


610.50 


Phillips Charitable Fund from P. A. Trustees 


600.00 


Gifts 


5.90 


Total 


$9335.89 



expenditurp:s 



Salaries 

Lighting and heating 

Periodicals 

Book binding 

Books 

Insurance 

Phillips Charitable Fund, invested 

War Library Fund 

Repairs and sundry items 

Cash on hand 

Total 



$3493 


.27 


579 


.32 


186 


.25 


246 


.64 


687 


.42 


220. 


.38 


600. 


00 


610 


50 


453. 


54 


2258. 


57 


$9335 . 


89 



130 



Statement of Income and Expenses of the Trustees of Memorial 
Hall Library for the Year of 1917 





INCOME 








Main. 


Books 


Cornell 


Total 


Income from investments 


$2100 68 


S666 23 


$327 90 


$3094 81 


Town appropriation 


1800 00 






1800 00 


Dog tax 


625 64 






625 64 


Fines 


147 96 






147 96 


Gifts 




5 90 




5 90 


Total 


$4674 28 


$672 13 


$327 90 


$5674 31 




EXPENSES 






Salaries 


$3380 00 




$113 27 


$3493 27 


Lighting and heating 


454 46 




124 86 


579 32 


Periodicals 


186 25 






186 25 


Book binding 


246 64 






246 64 


Books 




687 42 




687 42 


Insurance 


220 38 






220 38 


Sundry items 


420 41 




33 13 


453 54 


Total 


$4908 14 


$687 42 


$271 26 


$5866 82 


Unexpended income 






56 64 




Deficit for the year 


$ 233 86 


$ 15 29 




$ 192 51 



Condition of Funds and Unexpended Income on hand Jan., 1918 



Maintenance Fund 
Book funds (general) 
Book funds (special) 
Cornell fund (permanent) 
Cornell fund (purchase) 
Special 

Total 



Funds 


Unex. Inc. 


$46600 00 


$ 784 06 


13600 00 


555 73 


3800 00 


112 12 


5000 00 


262 72 


3854 65 


337 85 




64 94 


$72854 65 


$2117 42 



131 



INVESTMENTS 



Bangor & Aroostook R.R. 4s 

Boston Elevated Ry. Co., 4V^s 

Boston Elevated Ry. Co., 4s 

Chicago Railway Co., 5s 

Montreal Tramways Co., 5s 

Michigan State Tel. Co., 5s 

Boston & Maine R. R. 4s 

Boston & Albany Equip. Trust, 4^?s 

Savings Banks 

Mortgage on Real Estate 5% 

Am. Tel. & Tel. Co., 4 shares 

Principle Cash 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 

Total 



SI 1000 00 

1000 00 

10000 00 

9962 50 

9962 50 

4981 25 

2000 00 

2981 10 

15254 65 

4000 00 

571 50 

141 15 

1000 00 

$72854 65 



Income cash on hand 
Principle cash on hand 

Total 



2117 42 
141 15 

$2258 57 



FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL. Treasurer 



I certify that I have examined and found correct the above 
statements as of January 15, 1918, whereby all securities held 
against the several funds have been examined and the income 
accruing from same accounted for. 

All disbursements are supported by receipts in proper form and 
the cash on deposit as shown has been verified and found correct. 



BURTON S. FLAGG, Auditor 



January 29, 1918. 



132 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library: 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the library for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1917. 

The end of 1917 finds the main library with a record of 35,731 
books issued for home use during the year, — an increase of 2029 
over 1916. At Ballard vale, 6136 books were borrowed. The 
total is 41,867 as compared with 40,377 in 1916. 

To explain fluctuations of circulation is always difficult, but 
when the United States declared war upon Germany last April, 
it certainly seemed probable that, with the many new war ac- 
tivities springing up on every side, less use than usual would be 
made of the public library. This has not been the case. Not only 
has the circulation increased but there has been a larger use 
of books other than fiction. People are intensely interested in the 
war, in military matters, in all current history, in economic ques- 
tions and other problems of the day, and we have done our best 
to meet these demands by providing timely publications and by 
utilizing the numerous books and pamphlets sent us by our 
government and those of our Allies. 

In the spring when the country was being urged to plant 
gardens, we bought a number of new books on agriculture, on 
vegetables, and other gardening books adapted especially for 
amateurs. This collection was used constantly by the Supervisor 
engaged by the Public Safety Committee and by the instructor in 
charge of the school gardens. Others came frequently for these 
books and more than a few people who planted war gardens owe 
a part of their success to their town library. Later, we obtained 
and distributed from the government, from the Essex County 
Agricultural School, from the State Agricultural College at Am- 
herst and from the National Food Emergency Commission at 
Washington, hundreds of circulars on gardening, on canning, pre- 
serving and drying fruits and vegetables. Every family in Ando- 

133 



ver had the opportunity to obtain tree of charge this advice from 
experts. 

After the canning season, we bought several valuable books on 
food conservation and household economics, cook-books showing 
how to prepare wholesome, nutritious food, using only ingredients 
which are plentiful and which cannot be exported. The con- 
nt demand for these books shows that they are proving help- 
ful. 

The library has done other war work during the year. When 
the American Library Association started its campaign to provide 
books for the men in service. Andover was asked to give an 
amount equivalent to 5% of its population. Including the $100 
sent us by Phillips Academy, the town gave for this purpose $610, 
exceeding by about 30% its required quota. 

People have also brought quantities of magazines and 8 
books for the soldiers. These have been packed in boxes contrib- 
uted by neighboring stores and have been sent, some directly to 
Aver, others to the Boston Public Library, which is acting a> 
clearing-house for camps in the South. The library will receiv 
books for this purpose at any time and will see that they ar e 
packed and shipped. 

We have also bulletined material relative to any special call, 
>uch as these war libraries, the Y. M. C. A., the Liberty Loan- 
the Red Cross, and in every way have tried to make our reading- 
room a publicity centre. The library has also joined the ranks of 
the fuel savers, and for the first time since we had the new heating 
plant, the glass covering has been placed on the well to the Mem- 
orial Hall. This is a detriment to ventilation and a real sacrifice 
on the part of the staff, but enabled us to run the small heater 
until Thanksgiving, and will permit its use early in the spring. 

During February and again in November, a series of talks was 
given to two different classes in the Punchard School on the use of 
reference books. Each division heard four; the first being on 
the general make-up of a book, the purpose of indexes and the 
ms of classification and cataloging used in the library. The 
second talk dealt with encyclopedias and dictionaries in general, 

134 



and with reference books of biography and current statistics; 
the third with books of especial value in looking up questions of 
history, geography, government and literature; while the fourth 
considered books helpful in music, art, religion and education, 
and explained the use of the very important magazine indexes. 
Each talk was followed by questions involving the use of the books 
just explained, and from the enthusiasm with which the classes 
went to work upon these problems, it was plain that they en- 
joyed the experience, as well as learned something during the 
time spent at the library. In all, twenty-four talks were given to 
six different groups of pupils, and immediate result was seen in 
the way the young people tried to put into practice their newly 
acquired knowledge, and their evident pride in greater ability 
to use a library that seemed to them, perhaps for the first time, 
peculiarly their own. It is proposed to continue these talks as a 
part of the required course for every student entering Punchard. 

We have sent the usual libraries to the district schools and in 
addition have loaned books to the High School. The library has 
now an adequate collection of children's books, and it is hoped to 
extend this privilege to any public school desiring it. The use of 
the library by both pupils and teachers is large and gratifying. 

Before Christmas we held our usual holiday exhibit of books 
suitable for children, a collection that was enjoyed by visitors 
and which proved helpful to people in search of gifts. Early in 
December the librarian went to Haverhill to speak before a meet- 
ing of the librarians and trustees of Essex County on the best 
juvenile books of the season. 

Our record of gifts acknowledges books and flowers from various 
friends. Many volumes that would ordinarily have come our 
way have gone this year to the men in camp and at the front. It 
was a fine collection of books that passed through our hands for 
this purpose and a good proportion we would gladly have wel- 
comed for our own shelves. 

Many and very interesting war books and pamphlets have been 
sent us from England through Sir Gilbert Parker and the Univer- 
sity of Glasgow. The books have been placed in circulation; the 

135 



pamphlets filed for use. The library also receives regularly from 
Washington the Official Bulletin issued by the Public Information 
Committee, and Food Notes from the War Service Board of the 
American Library Association. 

The branch at Ballardvale is in a flourishing condition and the 
apparent drop in its circulation is due to the greatly increased 
number of young people now coming to the High School and using 
the main library not only for themselves but for their families. 
During the winter the officials in charge of the Liberty Bond 
issues found the branch library the most convenient place to re- 
ceive installment payments. 

This is our first experience of war, but at the end of 1917, we can 
look back with the consciousness that the Memorial Hall Library 
has been both a help and a resource to the community. We hope 
this may be our only war report, but whatever may be in future, 
the coming year will find us prompt to grasp any chance to be of 
service, ready to meet any demand upon us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDNA A. BROWX. 

Li br aria n 



136 



STATISTICS OF THE LIBRARY 

Number of books issued for home use at the Memorial Hall 3573 1 

Number issued at Ballardvale 6136 

Total 41867 

Percentage of fiction circulated 69 

Percentage of non-fiction circulated 3* 

New borrowers registered 33% 

Actual number of cards in use 2726 

Books added by purchase 665 

Books added by gift 122 

Total accessions 787 

Books withdrawn, worn out, etc. 251 

Total number of books in the library 23789 

Volumes rebound 268 

Volumes bound, periodicals, etc. 74 

BALLARDVALE 

Number of books issued for home use 6136 

Percentage of fiction 84 

Percentage of non-fiction 16 

Number of cards in use 350 

Books added during 1917 118 

Books now belonging to branch 1290 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

Gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from state and 
government departments, from other libraries, the Andover Vil- 
lage Improvement Society and from the following individuals: 

B. M. Allen; C. K. Bancroft; Mrs. R. N. C. Barnes; Mrs. Wal- 
ter Buck; Mrs. P. W. Dove; Miss M. W. Dwight; Loring Higgins; 
Andrew Lawrie; W. K. Moorehead; Sir Gilbert Parker; Mrs. A. 
F. Pease; Mrs. George Ripley; G. B. Ripley; Miss Dorothy Wade. 

137 



NEW BOOKS ADDED DURING 1917 



State and government documents and annual reports are not listed. Dupli- 
cates, replacements and books for Ballardvale are also omitted. 

GENERAL REFERENCE BOOKS 

028 B13 Bacon, Corinne, comp. Children's catalog of 3500 

titles. 

929 E42 *Eliot, S. A. ed. Biographical history of Massachu- 

setts. 5v. 

028.7 H77 Hopkins, F. M. comp Reference guides that should 

be known. 

423 W39 Webster, Noah, comp. Unabridged dictionary. 

PERIODICALS 

051 R32 American monthly review of reviews, v. 54, 55. 

071 A552 Andover Townsman, v. 29, 30. 

051 A881 Atlantic monthly, v. 118, 119. 

052 B56 Blackwood's magazine, v. 200. 
051 B64 Bookman, v. 44, 45. 

051 C33 Century, v. 92, 93. 

705 C84 Craftsman, v.30 

370.5 E39 Elementary school teacher, v. 17. 

051 F77 Forum, v. 56, 57. 

716 G16 *Garden magazine, v. 24, 25. 

051 H23 Harper's magazine, v. 133, 134. 

705 H81 *House beautiful, v. 40, 41. 

051 138 Independent, v. 87-90. 

705 161 "International Studio, v. 59-62. 

020.5 L61 Library journal, v. 41 

051 L71 Littell's living age, v.290-294. 
071 N21 Nation, v. 103, 104. 

910.5 N21 National geographic magazine, v. 30, 31. 

052 N62 Nineteenth century, v. 80. 

051 N81 North American review, v. 204, 205. 

799.5 094 Outing, v. 68, 69. 

051 094 Outlook, v. 114-116. 

621 P81 Popular mechanics, v. 26, 27. 

020.5 P96 Public libraries, v. 21. 

051 S147 St. Nicholas, v. 43, pt. 2, 44, pt. 1. 

370.5 S35 School arts magazine, v. 16. 

605 S416 Scientific American, v. 115, 116. 

051 S434 Scribner's magazine, v. 60, 61. 



* Gifts 



138 



305 S96 Survey, v. 36-38. 

051 W89 World's work, v. 32, S3. 

ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS BOOKS 

(Purchased chiefly from the Phillips Fund) 

174 A88 At wood, A. W. How to get ahead. 

220.92 B28 Barton, G. A. Archaeology and the Bible. 

248 B38p Beard, Frederica, comp. Prayers for use in home, 

school and Sunday school. 

174 B56 Blackford & Newcomb. Analyzing character. 

177 C75 *Conde, Bertha. Business of being a friend. 

209 D41 . *Denney, James. Studies in theology. 

248 E44 Elliott, Walter. The spiritual life. 

173 E77 Espey, C. E. Leaders of girls. 

193 F46 Figgis, J. N. Will to freedom. 

173 F53 Fisher, D. C. Self-reliance. 

234 F78c Fosdick, H. E. Challenge of the present crisis. 

225 G62 Goodspeed, E. J. Story of the New Testament. 

234 H66r Hodges, George. Religion in a world at war. 

240 H99 Hyde, W. deW. Gospel of good will. 

252 J83 Jowett, J. H. Whole armor of God. 

134 L82r ' Lodge, Sir Oliver. Raymond. 

248 M 13 McComb, Samuel. The new life. 

173 P96 Puller, Edwin. Your boy and his training. 
270.6 S22 Sanford, E. B. History of the reformation. 

174 S39 Schwab, C. M. Succeeding with what you have. 
237 S63g Slattery, C. L. Gift of immortality. 

292 T18 Tatlock, J. M. Greek and Roman mythology. 

201 W46 Wells, H. G. God the invisible king. 

377 W69 Wilbur, M. A. A child's religion. 

GENERAL ECONOMICS 

331.4 B43 Bennett, H. M. Women and work. 

331.4 B65 *Bosworth, L. M. Living wage of women workers. 

337 B76 *Bridgman, R. L. Passing of the tariff. 

396 G37 Gilbert, Eleanor. Ambitious woman in business. 

338.9 K61 *Kingsbury, S. M. ed. Labor laws and their enforce- 
ment. 

364 M12 *MacBrayne & Ramsay. One more chance. 

330 M24 McPherson, L. G. How the world makes its living. 

365 081s Osborne, T. M. Society and prisons. 

304 R67f Roosevelt, Theodore. Foes of our own household. 

352 T37 Thompson, C. D. Municipal ownership. 

325 W24 Warne, F. J. Tide of immigration. 

139 



168 B17 


373 F95 


377 L19 


150 082 


373 S79 


371 S91 


424 U93 


375.8 V24 


359 E12 


355 E44 


355 F88 


355 K46 


355 M45 


359 S86 



BOOKS ON EDUCATION 

Baker, G. P. Specimens of argumentation. 
Fuess, C. M. An old New England school. 
Lamoreaux, A. A. Unfolding life. 
O'Shea, M. V. Social development and education. 
Stearns, A. E. and others. Types of schools for boys. 
Strayer & Norsworthy. How to teach. 
Utter, R. R. Everyday words and their uses. 
Value of the classics. 

MILITARY TRAINING 

Earle, Ralph. Life at the U. S. Naval academy. 

Ellis & Garey. Plattsburg manual. 

French, Allen. At Plattsburg. 

Kerrick, H. S. Military and naval America. 

*Maxim, Hudson. Defenceless America. 

Stirling, Yates. Fundamentals of naval service. 

NATURE BOOKS 

502 B23 Barber, F. D. and others. First course in general 

science. 

Beals, K. N. Flower lore and legends. 
Clute, W. N. Our ferns in their haunts. 
Fabre, J. H. C. Life of the caterpillar. 
Fabre, J. H. C. Life of the grasshopper. 
Fabre, J. H. C. The mason-bees. 
Keeler, H. L. Wayside flowers of summer. 

BOOKS FOR HOME AND FARM 

Baldt, L. I. Clothing for women. 

*Bitting, A. W. Canning and how to use canned food. 

Brock, A. C. Studies in gardening. 

Buchanan, Florence. Home crafts of to-day and 

yesterday. 

Cable, G. W. Amateur garden. 

Cooper, L. F. How to cut food costs. 

Croy, M. S. 1000 shorter ways around the house. 

East, A. M. Kitchenette cookery. 

Fish, A. Z. American Red Cross text-book on home 

dietetics. 

Flint, E. D. The garden patch. 

Franks, T. Q. Household organization for war service. 

Gillmore, M. M. comp. Meatless cookery. 

Glover, E. G. comp. Book of hints to housewives. 



140 



398.2 B36 


587 C62 


595.7 Flic 


595.7 Fllg 


595.7 Film 


580 K24w 


646 B 19 


641 B54 


716 B78 


640 B85 


716C11 


640 C78 


640 C88 


641 E13 


641 F52 


635 F64 


640 F85 


641 G41 


640 G51 



632 H43 Herrick, G. W. Insects of economic importance. 

640 H83 Howe, F. C. High cost of living. 

635 K93 Kruhm, Adolph. Home vegetable garden. 

716 M16 McFarland, J. H. My growing garden. 

796 P65 Pinkerton, K. G. Woodcraft for women. 

641 P87 Powell, Ola. Successful canning and preserving. 
641 P93 Prince, Jane. Letters to a young housekeeper. 
635 R32 Rexford, E. E. A. B. C. of vegetable gardening. 
643 R72 Rose, M. S. Feeding the family. 

635 S46 Selden, C. A. Everyman's garden every week. 

640 S42 Scott, R. C. Home labor saving devices. 

640 S53 Sheaffer, W. A. Household accounting and economics. 
643 S55 Sherman, H. C. Food products. 

635 T36 Thomas & Castle. Vegetable growing for amateurs. 

641 Wll Wade.M.L. Book of corn cookery. 
716 W64 Wilder, L. B. My garden. 

614.3 W64 Wiley, H. W. 1001 tests of foods, etc. 

MECHANICAL AND FINE ARTS 

533.6 C68h Collins, A. F. How to fly. 

533.6 C69 Collins, F. A. The air man. 

770 C69 Collins, F. A. The camera man. 

537 H75 Homans, J. E. First principles of electricity. 

669 L61 Liddell, D. M. comp. Metallurgists' and chemists' 

handbook. 

629.1 P14 Page, V. W. How to run an automobile. 

621.3 S53 Sharp, J. M. Practical electric wiring. 

759.1 B61 Blashfield, E. H. Mural painting in America. 
740 B67 Bowers, R. S. Drawing and design for craftsmen. 
738 C14 Camehl, A. W. Blue china book. 

680 H 142 Hall & Buck. Handicrafts for the handicapped. 

782.2 K87 *Krehbiel, H. E. Studies in the Wagnerian drama. 
738 L58 Lewis, J. S. Old glass and how to collect it. 

749 R55 Robie, Virginia. Quest of the quaint. 

LITERATURE, ESSAYS AND POETRY 

808 B 17 Baker, H.T. Contemporary short story. 

824 B42b Bennett, E. A. Books and persons. 

824B791 Brooks, C. S. Journeys to Bagdad. 

821.08 C55 *Clarke, G. H. ed. Treasury of war poetry. 

827 C59c Clemens, S. L. Christian science. 

824 C88p Crothers, S. M. Pleasures of an absentee landlord. 

821.08 C91 Cunliffe, J. W. ed. Poems of the great war. 

822 D92f Dunsany, E. G. M. D. P. Five plays. 

821 F92m *Frost, Robert. Mountain interval. 



141 



824 G79g 
821.08 H12 
827 H42 
821.08 H73 
028 K45 
827 L46f 
822 M33t 

821.08 M75 
821 S49 

821.09 S93 
891.4 T12g 
824 T78 
824 W56 
821 Y34r 



Grayson, David. Great possessions. 
Haynes & Harrison, comp. Camp-fire verse. 
Herford, Oliver. Confessions of a caricaturist. 
Holman, C. E. comp. In the day of battle. 
Kerfoot, J. B. How to read. 
Leacock, Stephen. Further foolishness. 
Marks, Jeannette. Three Welsh plays. 
Monroe & Henderson, comp. The new poetry. 
Service, R. W. Rhymes of a Red Cross man. 
Sturgeon, M. C. Studies of contemporary poets. 
Tagore, Rabindranath. Gitanjali. 
Tryon, L. H. Speaking of home. 
Whibley, Charles. Pageantry of life. 
Yeats, W. B. Responsibilities, etc. 



BIOGRAPHY 



92 A211 
92 071 

92 U87 

92 C862 
92 D298 
92 G352 

92 G388 
92 L697 
92 M834m 
92 J921 
92 G139s 
92 P683 
92 W932 
369 C71 
369 M45d 
369 M45s 

922 G73 
927.5 M27 

923 S153 
923S156 

929.4 W41 



Adams, C. F. Autobiography. 
*Barine, Arvede. La Grande Mademoiselle. 
* Barrows, J. O. In the land of Ararat; sketch of 
Elizabeth F. B. Ussher. 

Creevey, C. A. S. Daughter of the Puritans. 
Davis, R. H. Adventures and letters. 
Gibbons, James, cardinal. Retrospect of fifty years. 
2v. 

Gilder, R. W. Letters. 

*Lister, Charles. Letters and recollections. 
Mackail, J. W. Life of William Morris. 2v. 
*Page, Jesse. Judson, the hero of Burma. 
Smith, S. K. John Galsworthy. 
Speer, R. E. Memorial of Horace Tracy Pitkin. 
*Wright, G. F. Story of my life and work. 
*Society of Colonial wars. Yearbooks. 5v. 
*Mayflower descendant. 2v. 
*Mayflower descendant. Meetings, etc. 
Gould, S. B. Lives of the saints. 16v. 
McSpadden, J. W. Famous painters of America. 
Saint-Simon, due de. Memoirs. 

Sainte-Beuve, C. A. Portraits of the 17th century . 
2v. 

Weekley, Ernest. Surnames. 

Also *Vital Records of Brewster, Chelsea, East Bridge- 
water, Gloucester, Granville, Greenfield,. Salem, Ux- 
bridge. 



142 



DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 



726 A22 
915.2 A54 
919 A54 
919.8 B28 
918.7 B31 
914.7 B31 
917.5 C84 
971.2 D34 
941.5 D92 

914.7 G76w 

914.1 G875 
917.55 H13 

914.1 M17 

918.8 M42 
913.7 M78s 

915.2 N63 
656 P31 
917.4 P87 
917.4 S24 
917.94 S25 
917.446 S52 
639 V61 



973 C36h 

972 F76 
960 G35 
941.5 H32 
940.9 H33a 
940.9 H33m 

973 N54 
973.74 R62a 

940.9 R72 

945 W15 



940.91 A18 
940.91 A36w 
940.91 B15 



*Addis, M. E. L. Scottish cathedrals and abbeys. 
Anderson, Isabel. Spell of Japan. 
Anderson, Isabel. Spell of the Hawaiian islands. 
Bartlett & Hale. Last voyage of the Karluk. 
*Bates, Lindon. Path of the conquistadores. 
*Bates, Lindon. Russian road to China. 
Cram, Mildred. Old seaport towns of the south. 
Deane, R. B. Mounted police life in Canada. 
Dunn & Lennox. Glories of Ireland. 
*Graham, Stephen. Way of Martha and the way of 
Mary. 

Griffis, W. E. Bonnie Scotland and what we owe her. 
Hale, L. C. We discover the Old Dominion. 
*MacGregor, Alexander. Highland superstitions. 
Matthews, G. S. Treasure. 
*Moorehead, W. K. Stone ornaments used by Indians. 
*Nitobe, Inazo. The Japanese nation. 
*Peabody, R. E. Merchant venturers of old Salem. 
Powell, L. P. Historic. towns of New England. 
Sargent, P. E. Handbook of New England. 
Saunders, C. F. Finding the worth while in California. 
Shackleton, Robert. Book of Boston. 
Verrill, A. H. Real story of the whaler. 

HISTORY 

Channing, Edward. History of the United States, 

v. 1-4. 

*Fornaro, Carlo de. Carranza and Mexico. 

Gibbons, H. A. New map of Africa. 

Hay, Ian. The oppressed English. 

Hazen, C. D. Alsace-Lorraine under German rule. 

Hazen, C. D. Modern European history. 

Nicolay, Helen. Our nation in the building. 

*History of the 1st regiment heavy artillery, M.V. 

1861-65. 

Rose, J. H. Development of the European nations, 

1870-1914. 

Wallace, W. K. Greater Italy. 

BOOKS ON THE GREAT WAR 

Ackerman, C. W. Germany the next republic? 
Aldrich, Mildred. Orvthe edge of the war zone. 
* Bailey, W. F. Slavs of the war. zone. 



143 



940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940.91 
940,91 
940.91 



B22 

B77 

B46 

B85b 

Cll 

C44 

D62 

C82 

C94 

D32 

E55 

E68 

F91 

G31m 

G35 

G35r 



940.91 G76 
940.91 H19 
940.91 H32k 
940.91 H32g 
940.91 H34 

940.91 H34i 
940.91 H86 
940.91 H86m 
940.91 J61s 
940.91 K46 
940.91 M26 
940.91 M73 
940.91 M96 
940 91 N15 
940.91 N48 
940.91 N86 
940. 91 094 
940.91 S87 
940.91 T78 
940.91 W19 
940.91 W21 
940.91 W21t 
940.91 W46i 
940.91 W66 
973.91 W69w 
353.03 W69 



*Bang, J. P. Hurrah and hallelujah. 

*Brittain, H. E. To Verdun from the Somme. 

*Bevan, Edwin. Method in the madness. 

*Buchan, John. Battle of the Somme. 

*Cammaerts, Emile. Through the iron bars. 

Chitwood, O. P. Immediate causes of the Great war. 

*Collected diplomatic documents. 

*Cosmos, pseud. Basis of a durable peace. 

Curtin, D. T. Land of deepening shadow. 

Dawson, Coningsby. Carry on. 

Empey, A. G. "Over the top." 

Erichsen, Erich. Forced to fight. 

Friends of France. 

Gerard, J. W. My four years in Germany. 

Gibbons, H. A. New map of Europe. 

Gibbons, H. A. Reconstruction of Poland and the near 

east. 

Grant, Robert. Their spirit. 

*Hankey, Donald. A student in arms. 

Hay, Ian. All in it! K 1 carries on. 

Hay, Ian. Getting together. 

*Headlam, J. W. History of twelve days, July 24- 

August 4, 1914. 

*Headlam, J. W. The issue. 

Huard, F. W. My home in the field of honour. 

Huard, F. W. My home in the field of mercy. 

Johnson, Owen. Spirit of France. 

*Kerr, S. P. What the Irish regiments have done. 

Mademoiselle Miss. 

*Mokveld, L. German fury in Belgium. 

*Murray, Gilbert. Faith, war and policy. 

*Namier, L. B. Germany and eastern Europe. 

New York Times. Current history of the war, v. 4-6 

Nobbs, Gilbert. On the right of the British line. 

*Out of their own mouths. 

Stone, Gilbert. Women war workers. 

*T'Serclaes & Chisholm. Cellar-house of Pervase. 

*War of democracy; the Allies' statement. 

*Ward, M. A. A. England's effort. 

*Ward, M. A. A. Towards the goal. 

Wells, H. G. Italy, France and Britain at war. 

*Willson, Beckles. In the Ypres salient. 

Wilson, Woodrow. War message, April 2, 1917. 

* Wilson, Woodrow. Why we are at war. 



144 



FICTION 

Aldrich, Darragh. Enchanted hearts. 

Allen, Robert. Captain Gardner of the International police. 

Andrews, M. R. S. Eternal feminine. 

Bacheller, Irving. Light in the clearing. 

Bailey, Temple. Mistress Anne. 

Barbusse, Henri. Under fire. 

Barr, A. E. Joan. 

Barr, A. E. *Maid of old New York. 

Bartlett, F. O. Triflers. 

Bartley, Xalbro. Paradise auction. 

Bell, J. J. Till the clock stops. 

Benedict, Clare. *A resemblance, etc. 

Benson, E. F. Michael. 

Bilbro, Mathilde. Middle pasture. 

Bindloss. Harold. Brandon of the engineers. 

Bindloss, Harold. Carmen's messenger. 

Bindloss, Harold. Johnstone of the border. 

Bottome, Phyllis. The derelict. 

Bottome, Phyllis. The second fiddle. 

Brooks, Alden. The fighting men. 

Brown, Alice. Bromley neighborhood. 

Brown, K. H. Wages of honor. 

Brubaker, Howard. Ranny. 

Buchan, John. Greenmantle. 

Buchan, John. Power-house. 

Buckrose, Mrs. J. E. Match-makers. 

Cholmondeley, Alice. Christine. 

Churchill, Winston. Dwelling place of light. 

Clifford, Sir Hugh. Further side of silence. 

Conrad, Joseph. The shadow line. 

Cooke, M. B. Bambi. 

Cooke, M. B. Cinderella Jane. 

Cutler, Robert. Louisburg Square. 

Dalrymple, Leona. Kenny. 

Dane, Clemence. Regiment of women. 

Day, Holman. Where your treasure is. 

Doubleday, Roman. Green tree mystery. 

Doyle, Sir A. C. His last bow. 

Doyle, Lynn. Mr. Wildridge of the bank. 

Ferber, Edna. Fanny herself. 

Flandrau, G. H. Cousin Julia. 

Foote, M. H. Edith Bonham. 

French, Allen. The hiding-places. 



145 



Goodrich, Arthur. Sign of freedom. 

Gordon, C. W. The major. 

Hall, Gertrude. Aurora the magnificent. 

Harker, L. A. Jan and her job. 

Harris, Corra. Circuit rider's widow. 

Hay, Ian. "Pip." 

Hill, Marion. McAllister's grove. 

Hopkins, W. J. Clammer and the submarine. 

Holme, Constance. The home-coming. 

Hough, Emerson. Man next door. 

Hughes, Rupert. In a little town. 

Jacobs, W. W. Castaways. 

Jordan, Elizabeth. Lovers' knots. 

Kerr, Sophie. Blue envelope. 

King, Basil. High heart. 

King, Basil. Lifted veil. , 

Kingsley, F. M. Neighbors. 

Kipling, Rudyard. Diversity of creatures. 

Lane, Mrs. John. War phases according to Maria. 

Lea, F. H. Chloe Malone. 

Lee, Jennette. Green jacket. 

Lefevre, Edwin. To the last penny. 

Lewis, Sinclair. The innocents. 

Lincoln, J. C. Extricating Obadiah. 

Locke, W. J. Red Planet. 

Lynde, Francis. After the manner of men. 

Lynde, Francis. Stranded in Arcady. 

McCutcheon, G. B. Green fancy. 

MacHarg & Balmer. Indian drum. 

Mackay, I. E. Up the hill and over. 

Marshall, Archibald. Abington Abbey. 

Miniter, Edith. Our Natupski neighbors. 

Montgomery, L. M. Anne's house of dreams. 

Moore, Leslie. Antony Gray, — gardener. 

Mundy, Talbot. King — of the Khyber rifles. 

Nesbit, E. The incredible honeymoon. 

Neilson, Francis. Strong man's house. 

Norris, Kathleen. Martie the unconquered. 

Xorris, Kathleen. Undertow. 

Norton, Roy. Unknown Mr. Kent. 

Nyburg, S. L. Chosen people. 

Olmstead, Florence. Anchorage. 

Onions, Mrs. Oliver. Boy with wings. 

Onions, Mrs. Oliver. Girls at his billet. 



146 



Onions, Mrs. Oliver. Miss Million's maid. 

Palmer, Frederick. The old blood. 

Pier, A. S. Jerry. 

Poole, Ernest. His family. 

Rice, A. H. Calvary Alley. 

Richmond, G. S. Brown study. 

Richmond, G. S. Red Pepper's patients. 

Ridge, W. P. Madam Prince. 

Rinehart, M. R. Long live the king! 

Rowland, H. C. Filling his own shoes. 

Scott, E. C. Elizabeth Bess. 

Seton, E. T. Preacher of Cedar mountain. 

Showerman, Grant. Country child. 

Sinclair, May. Combined maze. 

Slattery, Margaret. *Costly star. 

Smith, H. L. Other people's business. 

Van Schaick, George. Top-flat idyll. 

Wallace, Edgar. Clue of the twisted candle. 

Walpole, Hugh. Dark forest. 

Walpold, Hugh. Green mirror. 

Ward, M. A. A. "Missing". 

Webster, H. K. The thoroughbred. 

Wells, H. G. Soul of a bishop. 

Wharton, Edith. Summer. 

White, E. L. El Supremo. 

Wilkins & Kingsley. Alabaster box. 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS; NON-FICTION 

808.9 A75 Arnold & Gilbert. Stepping stones to literature. 7v. 

92 W367b Barnes, James. Hero of Stony Point. 

680 B381p Beard, Patten. Jolly book of playcraft. 

680 B68 Bowsfield, C. C. How boys and girls can earn money. 

821 C39d Chaucer. Story of the Canterbury pilgrims. 

614.8 C67 Cole & Ernst. First aid for boys. 
636 C73 Comstock, A. B. The pet book. 
338 C86 Crissey, Forrest. Story of foods. 

793 D29 Davison, G. L. Games and parties for children. 

821 D37 De la Mare, Walter. Peacock pie. 

808.9 D56p Dickinson, A. D. comp. Children's book of patriotic 

stories. 
977.3 F63 Fletcher, M. E. Old settler stories. 

355 G17j Garey and Ellis. Junior Plattsburg manual. 

590 H31 Hawkes, Clarence. Wood and water friends. 

821.08 L94 Lovejoy, M. I. comp. Nature in verse. 

147 



566 M69 Mix, J.I. Mighty animals. 

398.4 042r Olcott, F.J. comp. Red Indian fairy book. 

252 P22c Park, J. E. The children's bread. 

920 P23 Parkman, M. R. Heroes of to-day. 

920.7 P23 Parkman, M. R. Heroines of service. 
523 P83 Porter, J. G. Stars in song and legend. 
398.4 P96t Poulsson, Emilie. Top of the world stories. 

972 P92b Prescott, W. H. Boys' Prescott. 

398.4 S62n Skinner, E. L. Nursery tales from many lands. 

398.2 S72 Skinner, A. M. Topaz story book. 

808.9 S64m Smith, E. S. comp. Mystery tales for boys and girls. 

398.4 T32 Thackeray, W. M. Rose and the ring. 

973.2 W25 Warren, M. R. Little pioneers. 

914.98 Y26 Van Teslaer, J. S. When I was a boy in Roumania. 

910 V89 Youth's companion. By land and sea. 

920 Y89d Youth's companion. Daring deeds. 

973 Y89 Youth's companion. A great republic. 

917.3 Y89g Youth's companion. Greater America. 
920 Y89h Youth's companion. Heroic adventures. 
917.3 Y89e Youth's companion. Our country; east. 

917.8 Y89w Youth's companion. Our country; west. 

353 Y89 Youth's companion. Our national government. 

590 Y89 Youth's companion. Talks about animals. 

973.2 Y89 Youth's companion. Under the crown. 

973.3 Y89 Youth's companion. Winning independence. 

STORIES FOR CHILDREN 

Aldon, Adair. Island of Appledore. 

Ames, J. B. Under boy scout colors. 

Ashmun, Margaret. Heart of Isabel Carleton. 

Baker, E. A. Girls of Fairmount. 

Brown, E. A. Spanish chest. 

Carruth, Hayden. Track's end. 

Dix, B. M. Blithe McBride. 

Fisher, D. C. Understood Betsy. 

Hasbrouck, L. S. Chokecherry Island. 

Knipe, E. B. Lost little lady. 

Lindsay, Maud. Story garden for little children. 

Peattie, E. W. The newcomers. 

Peattie, E. W. Sarah Brewster's relatives. 

Perkins-, L. F. Belgian twins. 

Perkins, L. F. Cave twins. 

Pier, A. S. Plattsburgers. 

Sawyer, Ruth. This way to Christmas. 

Seaman, A. H. Girl next door. 

Wallace, Dillon. Bobby of the Labrador. 

Welsh, Charles, comp. Stories children love. 

148 



REPORT OF CUSTODIAN 
JOHN CORNELL ART GALLERY 



To the Trustees of Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the gallery for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1917. 

The attendance for the year has been 610. Cf this number 163 
were adults and 447 children; a good attendance, all things 
considered, and a slight increase over that of 1916, the number 
then being 600. 

It is encouraging to know that a large proportion of the adult 
visitors were not idle observers, n any being girls of eighteen or 
twenty years of age who came in a receptive frame of mind and 
appreciative of attention. This attitude toward the pictures 
has been shown to a marked degree by some of the children. A 
recent caller residing in Xew York and well acquainted with the 
Metropolitan Art Museum expressed much interest in the 
collection and regret thai he could not tarry long. His emphatic 
approval was gratifying. Two other callers were western people. 

The stereographs continue in great favor. The temperament 
of the child is plainly shown in the use of them. A few children 
have asked for stereographs from which they could obtain inter- 
esting subjects for use in language work, and occasionally an 
adult has spent a profitable half-hour with them. In the addi- 
tion of new window-seat cushions of the original coloring, and 
new curtains, the gallery has acquired much of its former fresh- 
ness. A most attractive place to visit. These improvements are 
a good ending for the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABBIE S. DAVIS 

Custodian 



149 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL 
REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



EMBRACING THE TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 

WATER COMMISSIONERS AND TWENTY-FIRST 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SEWER 

COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1917 



ANDOVER. MASS 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1918 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

188S— 1899 



*JOHN II. FLINT 



*FELIX G. 



*JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
HAYXES 



SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

1893—1894 1894—1899 

*WM. S. .JENKINS *WM. S. JENKINS 

*JOHN L. SMITH *JOHN L. SMITH 

CHARLES E. ABBOTT *JOHX E. SMITH 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

1899—1902 1903—1906 

*JOHN H. FLINT *JOHN L. SMITH 

*WM. S. JENKINS *FELIX G. HAYNES 

*JOHN L. SMITH JOHN W. BELL 

* JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD *LEWIS T. HARDY 

♦FELIX G. HAYNES JAMES C. SAWYER 



1906—1907 

*FELIX G. HAYNES 
JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER. Sec'y 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
HARRY M. EAMES 

1908—1912 

♦LEWIS T. LIARDY 
JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
WILLIS B. HODGK1NS 

1914—1916 

THOS. E. RHODES ('17) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Sec'v ('18) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. f 18) 



1907—1908 

♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

1913—1914 

♦LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('15) 
THOS. E. RHODES. Sec'v ('14) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. 

1916—1917 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('17) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'v ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. (T8) 



1917 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('20) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'v ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18] 

SUPERINTENDENT 

FRANK L. COLE 



♦Deceased 



REPORT OF 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



To the Citizens of Andover: 

In submitting our fifth annual report we would ask that the 
same be considered in conjunction with the four previous reports; 
in other words, we would request a review of the work done 
during the past five years, in order that our citizens may deter- 
mine whether or not the expenditures have been worth while; 
and, in addition, to determine if the Board has not accomplished, 
to a certain degree at least, its chief aim in creating permanent 
improvements, particularly in highway construction, which, if 
properly maintained, will materially reduce the expenditures as 



time goes on. 



Organization 



The first meeting was held on March 7th, and Mr. T. E. 
Rhodes having been re-elected, no changes were made in our 
organization. 

In Mem or i am 

In our last report we made special mention of the death of two 
highly respected citizens, former members of the Board, and by 
a singular coincidence two more have journeyed to that unknown 
land from which "no traveller returns". 

John L. Smith was Sewer Commissioner frcm 1893 to 1899, 
and a member of the Board of Public Works from 1899 to 1906. 
Mr. Smith died March 14, 1917. 

Felix G. Haynes was Water Commissioner from 1889 to 1899, 
and a member of the Board of Public Works from 1899 to 1908. 
Mr. Haynes died January 13, 1918. 

In a sense these men were "charter" members, and it can 



truthfully be said of them that they were "selected" men, giving 
freely of their time, without remuneration, that our citizens as 
a whole might benefit. 

Never deviating from the course of duty, strictly honest, these 
capable and highly respected men have left behind a record which 
is an inspiration to those who interest themselves in the welfare 
and the upbuilding of our town. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

As stated by our Superintendent, the cost of material — par- 
ticularly cast-iron pipe — having advanced more than 100% 
over the cost of 1916, has prohibited, for the time being, further 
extensions in the water system. Cost of coal, oil and labor has 
also advanced, and we must provide for the overhaul of one 
steam pump at Haggett's Pond Station already contracted for. 
It will therefore be necessary that we have an amount for main- 
tenance considerably in excess of what was voted last year. A 
careful estimate places this amount at $13,500, which is S2500 
in excess of the amount appropriated one year ago. 

For construction, which covers only the service pipe, we rec- 
ommend the appropriation of S1500, the same as last year. 

High Service Pump Station 

Under Article 10 of the Town Warrant, considered at the 
meeting on March 5, 1917, $4000 was appropriated for the pur- 
pose of putting in two electrically driven centrifugal pumps; the 
idea being to use in addition the money derived from the sale of 
the oil engine and building on Bancroft Road. Owing to the 
very high cost of labor and material we found, after due con- 
sideration, that the total outlay was rapidly approaching S8000. 
and as this amount greatly exceeded our appropriation, the 
majority of the Board did not feel that they could consistently 
go on with the work, and accordingly ordered the work on the 
pumps stopped, pending a reconsideration of the entire matter 
at the coming town meeting. 

In the meantime we have obtained from the makers a sub- 
stitute proposition, which would materially reduce the cost, and 



will probably take care of the emergency, for it is a well-known 
fact that the oil engine at the pump station on Bancroft Road 
is in good condition, and will probably last for several years. 

The plan now is to use the pump house as it stands, together 
with the oil engine, and in addition to put in one 5 -inch double 
suction pump, together with a 30-horsepower General Electric 
Induction Motor, the cost of which is given us as SI 525. 

The total expense, as near as we can determine, is S2491, 
made up as follows : — 

One 5-inch double suction pump SI 525 00 

One 2-inch vertical Sump pump 366 00 

Foundation and extras 600 00 

— S2491 00 

An article will be incorporated in the Warrant, in accordance 
with the above. (See Note.) 

In making this recommendation we do not wish to withdraw 
from our original position — that a complete change-over is 
most desirable — and in normal times we should be inclined to 
follow the wishes of our citizens, as expressed at the meet- 
ing one year ago; however, the majority do not feel that the 
expenditure of S8000 at this particular time is warranted, and 
realizing that the new equipment can be used in the reconstruction 
of the entirely new plant at some future date we make the 
recommendation as stated above. 

The Water Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the Water System is S159,000. There 
have been paid during the year 1917 S10,000 of the 4% bonds 
and S3000 of the 3J4% bonds. 

Of the above amount of indebtedness S50,000 is redeemable 
by sinking funds which amount to S36,217.99, and an appro- 
priation of S750 is asked for the Sinking Funds. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

Very little work has been done, because of the rapidly increas- 
ing cost, requiring a curtailment as far as possible. 

The extension on Summer Street, as ordered bv the State 



Board of Health, and voted upon at the last town meeting, was 
made, and is already in use. 

An extension for a short distance of 525 feet was also made 
on Abbot Street at the urgent request of the property owners of 
that section. 

We recommend an appropriation of $2500 for maintenance, 
which is the same amount as appropriated last year. 

The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the Sewer System is $105,000. Of the 
above amount of indebtedness $40,000 is redeemable by sinking 
funds, which amount to $22,497.02, and an appropriation of 
$1000 is asked for the Sinking Fund. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

It must be apparent to those who travel on our highways that 
practically all the streets radiating from the Centre are now in 
first-class condition, and every effort to attain permanency in 
road construction has had the consideration of the Board, par- 
ticularly during the past year. 

Before proceeding with new work it has been the practice to 
arrange, in so far as possible, to have sewer and water connections 
put in; underground drains, catchbasins, etc., installed, and thus 
prevent the tearing up, which in previous years has proved very 
costly to the town. 

The rapidly increasing costs in labor and material have pre- 
vented the Board from doing all of the work originally planned 
for, although reference to the Superintendent's report will show 
that $12199.06 was spent in reconstruction. This was done prin- 
cipally on Chestnut Street, Whittier Street and Central Street. 

The average cost, including drains, catchbasins, etc., for the 
work above mentioned, is 1.127 per square yard, or, for road 
construction alone. .947 per square yard. While we realize that 
this is an advance over the previous year, a comparison with the 
figures reported by the State shows that we have obtained rock- 
bottom costs in so far as this is possible under present conditions. 

8 



To discontinue all new work because of existing conditions 
would result very seriously to the town. 

First. It would be unfair to the citizens who have already 
contributed largely through taxation, and who have as yet failed 
to benefit from these improvements in their particular locality. 

Second. During the past five years our Superintendent, 
together with his assistants, has received much experience, which 
materially reduces road construction ccsts from year to year, 
and to lose the services of these trained men, if only for a year, 
would be a step backward. 

Third. To continue this work of reconstruction within certain 
bounds will bring us nearer to the time when every street within 
a mile, or possibly two miles, of the Centre, will be in first-class 
condition, and require very little expense for maintenance from 
year to year, except the cost of blanketing and possibly minor 
repairs, usually done in the spring of the year. 

The problem of reaching the outlying districts is becoming 
more difficult each year. We are inclined to believe that this 
can only be accomplished by the use of auto trucks, for which a 
special appropriation will be asked when conditions warrant our 
doing so. 

Surely a farmer who invests his money in property which 
necessitates his sending produce to markets at certain periods 
during the year, is entitled to a road over which he can travel 
without endangering the lives of his horses, and the loss of goods 
from which he gains a living. 

Efforts have been made during the past year to induce some 
farmers in outlying districts to use their teams in making certain 
roads passable. The Board, however, has met with very little 
success, owing to the shortage of labor and the unwillingness of 
farmers to use their teams for purposes other than farming, 
particularly when required in planting and harvesting. 

The Board hopes to do a certain amount of work in the 
villages during the coming year, and if the plan as now proposed, 
to use the stone-crusher, located at present in Indian Ridge 
section, can be put into effect, the cost of putting these roads in 
first-class condition should be materallv reduced. 



In addition, we should spend some money on Main Street 
Abbot Street, Pearson Street, x^ndover Street (to Ballard vale), 
and possibly some others. 

We recommend for maintanance and construction that the 
town appropriate the sum of vS35,000, together with all moneys 
obtained from railway franchise and excise taxes, together with 
the tax for street sprinkling. 

Lowell Street 

It is a well-known fact that the work has proceeded very slowly 
due to the small amount allowed at the last town meeting for 
this work; the same being practically one-half "what was origi- 
nally planned. In view of the work started on the Tewksbury end, 
it is very much desired that a larger appropriation be secured for 
this year, otherwise it will be several years before we can divert 
the travel which now follows the boulevard from Lawrence to 
Lowell, to the most direct route via Haggett's Pond. 

Sxow Removal 

The cost to the town for the removal of snow has more than 
doubled during the past year, owing to the shortage of labor and 
the scarcity of horses available for this purpose. 

Sidewalks 

The deplorable condition of our sidewalks throughout the 
town has prompted the Board to expend more money during the 
past year than for several years previous. The improvements, 
however, are more or less permanent, and the costs should 
gradually decrease from year to year, after the work is once 
completed. 

Some experiments have been made with granolithic walks, 
and when conditions return to normal these walks will undoubt- 
edly be more in demand, particularly in the center of the town. 
We recommend the expenditure of S2000 for sidewalks; SI 000 
to be spent under the Betterment Act. 

10 



Parks and Playsteads 

Little or no new work has been done during the past year, the 
chief attention of the Board being directed to the maintenance 
of the property now under the control of the town. We recommend 
the expenditure of SI 500 for Parks and Playsteads. 

Removal of Ashfs 

In disposing of Article 8 at the meeting on March 5, 1917, 
the Board was ordered to investigate and make a report which 
is as follows: — 

Twelve towns and cities were communicated with, and only 
four of the towns make a business of removing ashes from 
dwellings and business blocks. 

The following is self-explanatory: — 





Peabody 


iielhusu 


Awesbury 


No. A ndoici 


r Gardner Norwood 


No. teams used 
Summer 
Winter 


2 
2 


1 
*2 


2 


1 
1 




1 
1 


fWhen collected 


Daily 


Daily 


Weekly 


Weekly 




Weekly 


No. men employed 


3 


3 to 
each team 








2 


Area covered 


105 streets 


76 streets 


all 






11 sq. miles 


No. of families served 




1835 


2000 




1800 


1500 


Removed from what 
location 


Sidewalk 


Cellar 


Sidewalk 


Sidewalk 




Sidewalk £ 
Cellar 


Amt. appropriated ('17) 


S3500 




X'one 


S1200 


S600 


X'one 


Exp. to individual (17) 


None 


Xone 


5c per bbl. 


Xone 


Xone 


112 tickets 
S1.00 


Total cost ('17) 


S3274.23 


<KX) 


**S482.22 


^600 


$304 



*Fire Department horses are used to help out during the winter months. 

^Although collections are made daily in some towns, only a certain number of streets are covered 

each day; the result being thai ashes are seldom, if ever, removed from any one locality 

oftener than once a week. 
j: 2 7 7 6 tickets collected during 1917. 
**Does not include cost of town team; used. 
***Cost covers removol of rubbish. Ashes used for filling, and removed at convenience <>t" 

Highway Department; no record of cost kept. 



11 



It should be noted that the sale of tickets by the town of 
Norwood, at the rate of vSl.OO per dozen, did not cover the cost 
of removal for 1917. 

The only favorable comment is in a report received from the 
town of North Andover. We quote as follows: — 

"This is our second season for collection of ashes. 
The public is greatly benefited. These collections fill a 
long-felt want by our"townspeople." 

The following towns do not collect ashes : 

Belmont Middleton 

Clinton Reading 

Danvers Wakefield 

Ipswich Winchester 

In view of the difficulties in obtaining labor and teams, except 
at abnormally high rates, your Board is inclined to recommend 
that we defer action for a year or two on acceptance of any plan 
which will place the responsibility for removing ashes on the town. 
However, should the town take the opposite view, we believe 
that in the interest of all concerned the Board should be given full 
powers to make whatever rules are necessary, in order to make 
sure that the ashes are handled economically, and with as little 
discomfort to the travelling public as possible. 

We also believe that the appropriation should be adequate to 
cover the cost and that the town be reimbursed by the sale of 
tickets to individuals who are benefited by the removal of the 
ashes. 

Flooding of Playstead during Winter Months 

Under Article 9 the town voted, on March 5, 1917, to construct 
a gate to close the underground drain of the Playstead ; the 
purpose being to provide a skating pond during the winter 
months, and appropriated the sum of S100 therefor. 

We found on investigating the matter, the possibility of 
such very serious damage to the Playstead so apparent that 
we were reluctant to proceed in carrying out the ^wishes of the 
town without further instructions, and as an experiment a gate 

12 



toras constructed ai a point where the underground drain enters" 
the Playstead, thus flooding the field above. 

Unfortunately, the cold weather came upon us earlier than was 
anticipated, and in consequence our skating-pond exists only in 
our imagination. The total cost of the gate being less than $30, 
the appropriation remains untouched; the money being taken 
from the Park funds for this purpose. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BARNETT ROGERS 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 
ANDREW McTERNEX 
CHARLES B. BALDWIN 

Board of Public Works 

Note. — High Service Pump Station: Mr. Rhodes desires to be 
recorded as opposed to the plan approved by the majority. 



13 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 

Dr. 



To redeem Water Loans 



Balance. January 1, 1917 
Appropriation March 5, 1917 
Interest on deposits 



Water Loan Funds deposited 
Andover Savings Bank 
Andover National Bank 



To redeem Sewer Loans 

Balance, January 1, 1917 
Appropriation March 5, 1917 
Assessments, 1917 
Interest on deposits 



Sewer Loans deposited 
Andover National Bank 



Examined, 



Cr 



No. 


1 due 


1920 




SI 0000 00 


No. 


2 


< < 


1922 




10000 00 


No. 


3 


< < 


1923 




10000 00 


No. 


4 


< < 


1925 




15000 00 


No. 


5 


i i 


1928 




5000 00 








S34090 83 










750 


00 










1377 


16 














36217 99 


R. 


- 










8670 


15 










27547 


84 














36217 99 


Q 






K. 


due 


1919 




10000 00 






< i 


1928 
S19479 
1000 
1240 

777 


50 
00 
01 
51 


30000 00 
22497 02 



Cr. 



22497 02 



BARNETT ROGERS 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
CHARLES B. BALDWIN 

Sinking Fund Commissioners 



Nesbit G. G lea son 
John S. Robertson 
W. H. Coleman 

A iiditors 



14 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Public Works. 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit my report for the year 
ending December 31, 1917, making the twenty-ninth annual 
report of the Water System, the twenty-first report of the Sewer 
System, and the fifth report of the Highways and Parks, under 
your supervision. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

The year 1917 passes with no new mains laid at all; the prices 
having advanced double, and they are still higher now than a 
year ago, the cost of iron pipe being at present $56.00 a ton, 
against a price of $23.50 in 1916; lead being 12 cents a pound, 
against 4 7-8 cents in 1916. Therefore the present plant on 
December 31, 1917, is as follows : — 

Total length of main pipe 51.19 miles 

Number of hydrants 377 

Number of public buildings 15 

Number of fountains 8 

Number of standpipes 10 

Number of fountains at park 3 

Number of private hydrants 34 

Service Ptpks 

Applications received were thirteen, and of these only eleven 
were laid. The number of feet laid by the town, 251.1; laid by 

15 



property owners $92; relaid, 7 — making a total on December 
of 117,2 ; feet. 
610 cement lined 
857 lead lined 

all othe 



1503 total, or 117.295 feet 

Meters 

There were ?et during the year 1917 twenty-one new meu 
making a total of 1311 now in use. in size from 5-8 inch to 3-inch 
inclusive. 

Pumping Plants 

Haggett's Pond Station during 1917 was run 365 days: ninety 
days of which the oil engine was used, pumping : I ~ ; ; ,900 gallon 
in 1399 hours and 22 minutes, and using 7069 gallons of fuel oil. 
at 8 cents per gallon. 

The steam plant was used 275 days, pumping 165.138,1 
gallons, and consuming about 245 tons of coal ; the daily average 
for 1917 being 594.230 gallons per day. The average hours this 
year have been a little longer than in 1916, because the revolu- 
tions have been cut down, making it necessary to work a little 
longer than in the past, but this has been a saving on the 
machinery. 

The following table will be according to Engineer's Sheet: — 

Da Hours Gallons pumped Oil Coal Average dav 

":;40 7894123 7069 gals. 245 to 594230 

The station on Bancroft Road has run during the past year on 
onday, Wednesday and Friday of each week, as well as Satur- 
day forenoon, or about thirty hours each week. This station is 
now run on kerosene instead of fuel oil. 

Water Meters 

Water meters have been installed during 1916 and 1917 on 
c\ ery service pipe put in, and on a great many more places they 

16 



should be set; but according to our rules they are let off by having 
only one faucet at the sink. Meters are a great benefit to a city 
or town, as the rise in our receipts shows the last year or two, 

RECEIPTS 

Bills Maintenance Service pipe Totals 

Various parties, service pipe and meters $777 52 $777 52 
Various parties, repairs, labor and 

stock 442 30 323 04 765 34 



Totals s $442 30 $1100 56 $1542 86 

Water rates 24780 82 

Credits paid Town Treasurer 26323 68 

Water rates S24780 82 

Pipe account 1542 86 

$26323 68 $26323 68 

The advanced price of coal, labor, oils, packing, etc., will 
mean that the Water Department will need the coming year for 
maintenance $13,500, to be divided as follows: — 

Coal and oils N4110.00 

Salaries and labor 7405 00 

Keeping one horse " 364 00 

Miscellaneous repairs 1621 00 

— — SI 3500 00 

Service pipe same as 1917 — S1800.00. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

Main sewers were laid on Abbot Street and Summer Street. 
The one on Abbot Street was laid from bond money, while the 
one on Summer Street was a special appropriation, Article 15, 
of S3000.00 at the last town meeting. 

The Abbot Street sewer was a distance of 525 feet of 6-inch 
pipe. This work was started in June and finished in July, at a 
cost of $1305.49 — or $2.48 per foot. The cut at Phillips Street 
end was 12 feet deep, and at the other end only 4 feet. A great 
deal of water was found to handle. The Summer Street job was a 
distance of 1409 feet, and cost $2601.16, or about $1.84 a foot. 

17 



Sewer applications have been 67, and 67 already have been laid, 
making a total of 733 now in use. The 67 laid amounted to 
4773 feet of Akron pipe and iron, at an average cost of 66 cents 
per foot. Total feet. December 31, 1917, 51,147. 

The same appropriation will be necessary for Sewer Mainten- 
ance, to be divided as follows: — 

Power SI 000 00 

Labor 1200 00 

Miscellaneous 300 00 



Total $2500 00 

FRANK L. COLE, 

Superintendent 



1^ 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

WATER DEPARTMENT 





Summary 




Net Cost 


Total Cost 


Designation 


Approved 


Credits 


for 


of 




Bills 




1917 


Construction 


Office Fixtures .... 








$ 561 75 


Telemeters 








1311 63 


Telephone? .... 








184 77 


Teams 








583 65 


Pipe Distribution 








254405 02 


Service Pipe .... 


$2555 09 


$1100 56 


$1454 53 


26548 52 


Water and Land Damage 








6687 23 


Suction Pipe .... 








1309 46 


Reservoirs . . 








16985 82 


Coal Shed 








806 97 


Grading Land ... 








1739 12 


Workshop 








1271 88 


Building & Pumping Station 








9610 14 


Pumping Plants 






1431 93 


45833 76 


Construction Expenses 








9406 21 


Tools 


34 90 




34 90 


3535 64 


Maintenance 


11980 56 


442 30 


11538 26 




Totals 


$14570 55 


$1542 86 


$14459 62 


$380781 57 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Sewer Main in feet 

Number of Filter Beds .... 
Number of Sludge Beds .... 

Cost to Abutters 

Cost to Town 


46040 


28 
3 


$124519 78 
127358 05 


Totals 

Includes A. V. Sewer 


46040 


31 


$251877 83 



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3 oj « 



HIGHWAYS AND PARKS 



To the Board of Public Works. 

Gentlemen :■ — I herewith submit the fifth annual report of 
the Highway Department for the year ending December 31, 1917. 

The first work of the year was the snow of January 3rd, and 
from then to March 2nd we tried to keep the snow removed and 
the sidewalks sanded. On April 1st we started a few men on 
cleaning gutters. This work lasted about three weeks. 

Ashes were used this year on Highland Road; also on Burnham 
Road, Chestnut Street, High Street, Railroad Street, Washington 
Avenue, River Road, Webster Street, and Abbot Street. 

After the gutters were cleaned we started a few small repairs, 
such as replacing old, broken-down culverts with new corrugated 
pipe. While this work was being done there was another gang 
of men getting out sand, and teams hauling to the different 
streets, getting ready for the blanketing coat of Tarvia B. which 
is used now instead of the water-carts. This blanketing all 
completed, the new work started on June 11th on Chestnut 
Street, and was completed on July 23rd — 4051 yards of new 
road being built from Main Street to the brook near the residence 
of Mr. George Holt, at a cost of S4190.22, or SI. 03 per square 
yard, including curbing, catchbasins, corrugated pipe, labor, etc., 
or for road construction only 89 cents per square yard. 

Whittier Street 

We started on July 23rd and finished August 6th — 2975 yards. 
This was a Tarvia-bound road, and cost S3505.34, or SI. 17 per 
yard for all material used, such as catchbasin, curbing, pipe for 
drains, etc. For stone, Tarvia, and labor, road work only, a 
cost of SI. 00 per square yard. This connected Chestnut Street 
with Elm Street by a Tarvia road. 

On August 7th we started getting sand again, to blanket that 
part of Lowell Street that was built in 1915, 1916, which was 

24 



completed, and work started on the 1917 contract for Lowell 
Street on August 14th, and was completed on October 9th, with 
4600 yards more of work done on Lowell Street. This started 
near the residence of Mr. Granville Cutler at Station 5300. The 
contract called for work to stop at Station 7200, but we were able 
to do 300 feet more of 18-foot road than called for, so we stopped 
at Station 7500, near the last gate of the cemetery. This work 
was looked after and done by the Massachusetts Highway Com- 
mission Engineer, Mr. Delano, and your Superintendent. The 
cost of the job was $7442.51, which was divided equally between 
State, County and Town. I would say asphalt was used this 
year instead of Tarvia. This is the first time this kind of material 
has been used on this road, and while it cost a little more, the 
wearing of the road will be watched. At the rate we are building 
this road it will take from six to eight years to finish it, and then, 
according to reports, the State intends taking it over. I think 
steps should be taken to have the State take it over at once. 
While we had only $2500.00 this year on our end of the work, 
Tewksbury, who has started their end going from Andover line 
to Lowell, spent about $20,000.00, or $6000.00 to $7000.00 apiece, 
Town, State, and County building about one mile. 

On October 10th w r ork was started near the residence of Mr. 
Jones on Central Street, and finished at Lupine Road on Novem- 
ber 10th; there being done 4028 square yards of Tarvia road, at 
a cost of $4772.36. This included curbing, cutting hill drain, 
and all work done on road — or $1.18 per yard, while the road 
work only cost 95 cents per yard. 

There were 785 feet of curbing set on the hill, two catchbasins 
built, and 110 feet of 10-inch drainpipe used. 

A small job was done by the Town and State together on Main 
Street, near the residence of Mr. George Chandler. The cost of 
this work was $393.61, one-half of which the State paid. This 
was allowed to remain in a bad condition longer than I wished, 
but nobody was to blame, as the State held us up on this work 
for a long period. 

25 



Oiling Streets 

There was only one car of oil used this year; Tarvia B and sand 
being used now on all good roads. 

Ashes 

Ashes were used on a great many different streets, as I reported 
before. They are being used on the back streets a great deal, and 
I would recommend they be either oiled or have a light coat of 
Tarvia for a binder. These ashes should be well rolled, wet, and 
rolled again, and then they will last for years with a very little 
attention, if blanketed with some material for a binder. Thr- 
ashes on Webster Street and the River Road were not rolled this 
year, because the roller was caught in the early winter on Abbot 
Street and could not get up there, but it is my intention to send 
the roller there the first thing this spring, as well as more ashes. 

Sidewalks and Curbing 

Work has been done on High Street, resurfacing both sides; 
also Main Street, Elm Street, Abbot Street, Bartlet Street, Salem 
Street, Highland Road, and School Street all have had some 
resurfacing, as well as fifteen driveways, put in so as to make the 
roadway and sidewalk as nearly equal as possible. 

New walks have been built on School Street, near the residence 
of Mr. George Selden, and in front of Abbot Academy property 
now occupied by Judge Mahoney. Part of this work was grano- 
lithic. 

A new walk on Whittier Street was done granolithic. 

A retaining wall and new walk were built on Highland Road, 
from William Watson's to the end of the wall by J.N. Cole's - 
a distance of about 430 feet of 6-foot walk. 

New walks were built in Abbott Village district; on Essex 
Street from railway station to end of street ; on east side ; on west 
side, from Brackett's store to Smith & Dove's Hall; on Red 
Spring Road, from Henderson's to Smith & Dove's last house, 
top of hill; Cuba Street, a distance of 141 feet; on Shawsheen 
Road, from end of walk by boarding-house to end of Smith & 

26 



Dove property by Brechin Terrace; on Red Spring Road from 
river pavSt mill gate to end of dry-shed. 

Curbing was set on Central Street, 785 feet; on Red Spring 
Road, 953 feet; on Essex Street, 886 feet; on Cuba Street, 141 
feet; on Shawsheen Road, 282 feet, total 3047 feet, as well as on 
Chestnut Street corners, where new street was built - Whittier 
Street as well. 

Drains 

Catchbasins have been added on Chestnut Street, Whittier 
Street, Central Street, Lowell Street, Abbott Village, as well as 
pipe laid to carry the water away to its natural courses. 

Ballardvale 

Work done by Mr. John Haggerty in Ballardvale section during 
1917 consists of cleaning gutters and catchbasins throughout th< 
village; also scraping and dragging. Laid about 700 feet ot 
cement curbing, built new catchbasins; used two carloads of dust 
on different sidewalks; also had walks resurfaced and some new 
work done. Amount spent in Ballardvale district covered by 
Mr. Haggerty and his men, vS2700.00. 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

Ordinary work, such as care of parks, playsteads, Boulder-. 
etc.; as well as burning leaves in the fall is all the park work thi> 
year. 

Appropriation March 5, 1917 S1500 00 

Expenditure — bills and payrolls 1279 0() 

Balance 220 94 



27 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation March 5, 1917 

Highway Department $36500 00 

Sprinkling 1876 46 

Lowell Street 2500 00 

Massachusetts Highway Commission 2480 84 

Essex County * 2480 84 

Credits 2897 61 

S48735 75 
Overdrawn 3400 34 

Total Expenditures 852136 09 

Expenditures 

Maintenance 820222 54 

Construction 12199 06 

Snow 2940 65 

Drains 1670 35 

Sidewalks and curbing 7660 98 

Lowell Street 7442 51 



S52136 09 $52136 09 

Overdrawn, shown by Town Treasurer not receiving the 
Franchise or Excise Tax. 



31 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




""WMIIIHIllWf** ^ 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1918 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1919 



CONTENTS 



Almshouse Expenses 


55 


Personal Property at 


59 


Relief out of 


59 


Repairs on 


57 


Superintendent's Report 


65 


Aiding Mothers 


58 


Animal Inspector 


70 


Appropriations, 1918 


16 


Art Gallery 


128 


Assessors' Report 


61 


Assets 


83 


Auditor's Report 


90 


Board of Health 


37, 72 


Board of Public Works 


Appendix 


Sewer Sinking Funds 


44 


Water Sinking Funds 


44 


Bonds, Redemption of 


49 


Brush Fires 


34 


Collector's Account 


81 


Cornell Fund 


71 


County Tax 


45 


Dog Tax 


45 


Dump, Care of 


50 


Fire Department 


31, 62 


Finance Committee 


91 


G. A. R. Post, 99 


44 


Hay Scales 


42 


Insurance 


42 


Interest 


48 


Jury List 


103 


Liabilities 


83 


Memorial Da) 


43 



Memorial Hall Library 44, 105 

Librarian's Report 110 

Miscellaneous 51 

Moth Superintendent's Report 69 

Moth Suppression 39 

New High School 27 

Notes Given 46 

Notes Paid 47 

Overseers of the Poor 53 

Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale 26 

Police 35, 64 

Printing and Stationery 38 

Punchard Free School, Report of 

Trustees 100 

Retirement of Veterans 50 

Schedule of Town Property 77 

Schools 22 

Selectmen's Report 22 

Soldiers' Relief 58 

Spring Grove Cemetery 41, 66 

State Aid 58 

State and Highway Tax 45 

Street Lighting 43 
Summary Collector's Cash Acct. 82 

Town House 29 

Town Meeting 7 

Town Officers 4, 28 

Town Warrant 95 

Treasurer's Report 83 

Tree Warden 40 

Report of 68 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1918 



Selectmen, Assessors and Overseers of the Poor 

HARRY M. EAMES, Chairman Term expires 1920 

CHARLES BOWMAN " " 1921 

WALTER S. DONALD, Secretary " " 1919 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
*JOHN W. BELL 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

School Committee 

MARY B. SMITH 
FREDERIC G. MOORE 
PHILIP F. RIPLEY 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
GEORGE A. CHRISTIE 
EDWARD C. CONROY 
EVERETT C. HILTON 
MARY W. FRENCH 
DAVID R. LAWSON 

Superintendent of Schools 
HENRY C. SANBORN 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 

BARNETT ROGERS Term expires 1919 

CHARLES B. BALDWIN " " 1919 

THOMAS E. RHODES " " 1920 

PHILIP L. HARDY " " 1921 

ANDREW McTERNEN " " 1921 

* Deceased 



Term expires 


1919 


<< <( 


1919 


11 n 


1919 


it It 


1920 


14 It 


1920 


n a 


1920 


n << 


1921 


<< << 


1921 


H a 


1921 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 

FRANK L. COLE 

Engineers of Fire Department 

WALTER I. MORSE, Chief WALTER H. COLEMAN, Clerk 

JOHN A. RILEY 



Board of Health 

FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 



Term expires 1921 
1919 
1920 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Constables 



GEORGE W. MEARS 
FRANK M. SMITH 
THOMAS F. DAILEY 



Term expires 1919 
1919 
1919 



<( 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

HAMBLIN 

SMITH 

STEARNS 

FLAGG 
E. KENDALL JENKINS 
Rev. FREDERICK A. WILSON 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 



NATHAN C 
GEORGE F. 
ALFRED E. 
BURTON S. 



:rm expires 


1921 


(< n 


1922 


n a 


1923 


a a 


1924 


ti it 


1925 


it n 


1919 


a 


1920 



Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1919 

SAMUEL H. BOUTWELL HARRY H. NOYES 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY M. EAMES 

FRANK T. CARLTON 



A uditors 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

XESBIT G. GLEASOX 

Trustees of Cornell Fund 

CHARLES N. MARLAND Term expires 1919 

JOHN C. ANGUS " " 1920 

Dr. WILLIAM D. WALKER " " 1921 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
JOHN H. PLAYDON 

Tree Warden 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 

Registrars of Voters 

CHARLES W. CLARK JOHN F. HURLEY 

PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 

Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 

WALTER I. MORSE DANIEL H. POOR 

GEORGE D. MILLETT WARREN L. JOHNSON 

FRED E. CHEEVER *JOHN W. BELL 

JOHN W. STARK 

* Deceased 



TOWN MEETING 



Annual Town Meeting March 4, 1918 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, SS. : To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the fourth day of March, 1918, 
at 6 o'clock A.M., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, two members of the 
Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the Board 
of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for one 
year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year, one 
Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, one Trustee of Cornell 
Fund for one year (to fill vacancy), two Trustees of Spring Grove 
Cemetery for one year (to fill vacancies), Fence Viewers, Pound 
Keeper, and any other officers the town may determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 
Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, 
Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 



Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G.A.R., Miscellaneous, Parks 
and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, 
Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water, Sewer, High 
School, and Andover Loan Act Bonds, Schools, Sewer Mainten- 
ance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove 
Cemetery, State Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town 
House, Tree Warden, Moth Department, Water Maintenance, 
Construction and Sinking Funds, and other town charges and 
expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will vote to extend the Water 
System from its present terminal on Lowell Street a distance of 
5600 feet to Brown Street, then 3900 feet on Brown Street, on 
petition of Charles W. Livingston and others, and appropriate 
the sum necessary for same. 

i 

Article 5. — To see if the town will vote to place an electric 
light on Lincoln Street between Fred McCollum's and James 
Magee's and appropriate a sum of money therefor, 6n petition of 
Arthur O'Hara and others. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000 for additions to the filter-beds, as ordered by the State 
Board of Health, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$2500 for the purpose of installing a 5-inch double suction pump, 
together with a 30-horsepower motor, and accessories, in the 
Pump Station on Bancroft Road, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will affirm its vote at the annual 
meeting of 1917, whereby it appropriated $4000 for the con- 
struction of a two-unit pumping plant within the reservoir circle 
off Bancroft Road and appropriate an additional sum of $1000 
to be added to the unexpended balance of the $4000 appropriated ; 
also to grant the Board of Public Works a sufficient sum from the 
W T ater Bonds, necessary to extend the water-main from the 
proposed pumping plant to a point near the present pumping 
plant on Bancroft Road, on petition of T. E. Rhodes and others. 

8 



Article 9. — To see if the town will appropriate ' the sum of 
S2500 for widening Essex Street Bridge over Shawsheen River, 
on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money not exceeding $5000, to continue the macadam on Lowell 
Street; the same to equal an amount which the State and County 
will severally appropriate, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will vote that citizens of the 
town in the National War Service and those hereafter engaged in 
the service shall be assessed for, but shall be exempt during the 
war, from paying a polltax, upon petition of Fred G. Cheney and 
others. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will grant the use of the Engine 
House Hall in Ballard Vale to the Ballard Vale Village Im- 
provement Society, and appropriate a sum of money sufficient 
to put it in proper condition for use for public gatherings, on 
petition of William Shaw and others. 

Article 13. — To act on any amendments to the Building Laws 
passed at the Annual Town Meeting of 1917, which may be 
offered by the Committee to meet the requirements of the 
Attorney General. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will vote to amend its By-Laws 
by inserting under Article 4 thereof sections to be numbered 12. 
13 and 14. 

Section 12. — The Selectmen may, as provided by 
Chapter 102 of the Revised Laws of Massachusetts and" 
amendments thereto, license suitable persons to be 
junk collectors, to collect, by purchase or otherwise,, 
junk, old metals, and second-hand articles from place 
to place within the limits of the Town of Andover and 
may revoke such licenses at pleasure; and any place, 
vehicle or receptacle used for the collection or keeping 
of the articles aforesaid may be examined at all times 
by the Selectmen, or by any person by them authorized 
so to do. 



—A license for the collection of junk shall 
not be granted to any person who is not a citizen of t: 
United States unless such person shall have declared 
hi- :tion to become a citizen of the United Stat 

;/ 14. — A lict nail be granted and issued 

:ly to such persons as have resided in the town of 
Andover for one year next preceding the date of appli- 
cation. 

A license fee of not less than r | ; 00) dolL 

must be paid to the Town Clerk at the time of making 
application for such license, and in the event that the 
license is not granted the Town Clerk shall refund 
the applicant the amount deposited. 

Article 15. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year 

Article 16. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 17. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in Anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 18. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriatio: 

Article 19. — To act upon the report of the Town officer- 

Article 20. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 21. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock A.M., and may be closed 
at 2 o'clock. P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting, as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

10 



Hereof fail not and make return oi this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this sixteenth day of February, A.I). 
1918. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of Andover 



Andovkr. March 4. 1918 

Ess MX, SS. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said town to meet at the time and place and for 
the purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places, where bills and notices 
are usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 



11 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 4, 1918 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House 
in said Andover on Monday, the fourth day of March, 1918, at 
six o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and 
after reading a part of the warrant, it was 

Voted, To dispense with the further reading of the warrant. 

Voted, To take up Articles 1 and 2 together. 

Voted, That the polls be closed at 2 o'clock p.m. 

Took up Articles 1 and 2 and proceeded to vote for Town 
Officers and on the Liquor License question by the Australian 
Ballot System. 

The ballot box was found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at six o'clock a.m., and closed at two o'clock 
p.m., as voted. The total number of ballots cast was 1004, sixty- 
eight (68) of which were female ballots for School Committee 
only. 

The result of the balloting was as follows: — 

Moderator — One year: 

Alfred L. Ripley 756 

Blanks 180 

Town Clerk — One year : 

George A. Higgins 724 

Blanks 212 

Town Treasurer — One year: 

George A. Higgins 698 

Blanks 238 

12 



Selectmen — Three years: 

Charles Bowman 639 

Louis G. Buck 82 

Gordon R. Cannon 189 

Blanks 26 

Assessors — Three years: 

Charles Bowman 630 

Louis G. Buck 85 

Gordon R. Cannon 189 

Blanks 30 

Collector of Taxes — One year: 

John W. Bell 738 

Blanks 198 

School Committee— Three years : 

Ralph W. Coleman 398 

Mary W. French 475 

Everett C.Hilton 449 

David R. Lawson 427 

Addison B. LeBoutillier 318 

Walter H. Thompson 317 

Blanks 628 

Board of Public Works axd Sinking Fund Commission- 
Three years: 

Philip L. Hardy 612 

Willis B. Hodgkins 328 

Andrew McTernen 591 

Blanks 341 

Board of Health — Three years: 

Franklin H. Stacey 676 

Blanks 260 

Auditors of Accounts — One year: 

Walter H. Coleman 679 

Nesbit G. Gleason 711 

John S. Robertson 730 

Blanks 688 

13 



Constables — One year: 

Thomas F. Dailey 677 

George W. Mears 641 

Frank M. Smith 700 

Blanks 790 

Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — Seven years: 

E. Kendall Jenkins 710 

Blanks 226 

Tree Warden — One year : 

Edward H. Berry 714 

Blanks 222 

Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in 
this town? 

Yes 274 

No 605 

Blanks 57 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted on by ballot 
and the check lists were used. 



REPORT OF PRECINCT CLERK 

Andover, Mass, March 4, 1918 
Polls open at 6 a.m. Voted to close polls at 2 p.m. Ballot box 
registered when open 0000. Ballot box registered when closed 
1006. Number of male ballots received 1650. Number of female 
ballots received 215. Number of male voters voted 936. Num- 
ber of female voters voted 68. Number of votes cast 1004. 
Number of male ballots returned 724. Number of female ballots 
returned 147. 

DANIEL A. COLLINS, Clerk 

14 



The Moderator declared : 

Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Treasurer for one year. 
Charles Bowman elected Selectman for three years. 
Charles Bowman elected Assessor for three years. 
John W. Bell elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 
Mary W. French elected School Committee for three years. 
Everett C. Hilton elected School Committee for three years. 
David R. Lawson elected School Committee for three years. 

Philip L. Hardy elected to Board of Public Works and Sink- 
ing Fund # Commission for three years. 

Andrew McTernen elected to Board of Public Works and 
Sinking Fund Commission for three years. 

Franklin H. Stacey elected Board of Health for three years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Nesbit G. Gleason elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Thomas F. Dailey elected Constable for one year. 

George W. Mears elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

E. Kendall Jenkins elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for seven years. 

Edward H. Berry elected Tree Warden for one year. 

15 



Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund — Dr. William D. Walker for 
three years. 

Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund — Charles N. Marland for one 
year to fill vacancy caused by death of Allan Simpson. 

Chose two Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery for one year 
to fill vacancies caused by deaths of John L. Smith and Felix G. 
Haynes — Fred E. Cheever, John W. Stark. 

Chose Fence Viewers for one year — James Saunders, Ray- 
mond L. Buchan, George W. Mears. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee (appointed by Moderator) 
— Walter H. Coleman, Colver J. Stone, Edwin E. Perry, Henry 
J. Gardner, Joseph L. Burns. 

Chose Finance Committee for one year (appointed by Mo- 
derator) — George Abbot, Samuel H. Boutwell, John H. Cam- 
pion, Walter M. Lamont, Chester W. Holland, Henry W. 
Barnard. 

Town Pound — Voted, That Town Barn and Barnyard be the 
Town Pound and that the Superintendent of the Town Farm be 
the keeper. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted — To appropriate the following stated sums of money: — 

Almhouse Expenses $4500 . 00 

Almhouse repairs 300.00 

Relief out of Almshouse 4300 . 00 

Aiding Mothers with Dependent children 500.00 

Board of Health 1500.00 

Brush Fires 600.00 

Fire Department 9400 . 00 

Hay Scales 125.00 

Highway Department, sidewalks, snow 25000.00 

(Sidewalks — $1000 to be spent under Betterment Act, 

but if no applications are received prior to August 1st, 

it shall be at the disposal of the Board of Public Works) 

Insurance 2000.00 



Amount carried forward 48225.00 

16 



Amount brought forward 

Insurance (Workmen's Compensation) 

Interest 

Memorial Hall Library 

Memorial Day 

Post 99, G. A. R. 

Miscellaneous 

Parks and Playsteads 

Police 

Printing and Stationery 

Public Dump 

Retirement of Veterans, Acts of 1912 

Redemption of Water Bonds 

Redemption of Punchard School Bonds 

Redemption of Andover Loan Act Bonds 

Schools and Receipts 

Sewer Department Maintenance 

Sewer Department Sinking Fund 

Soldiers' Relief 

Spring Grove Cemetery (and receipts from sale of lots) 

State Aid 

Street Lighting 

Town Officers 

Town House 

Tree Warden, Gypsy and Browntail Moth Dept. 

Water Department 

Maintenance 

Construction 

Sinking Fund 
Pump and Motor (Article 7) 
K>sex Street Bridge (Article 9) 
Lowell Street (Article 10) 
Old School House (Article 12) 

Total $221150.00 

The following motion was presented by the Hon. John N. Cole: 
That it is the sense of this meeting that the rates for water 

17 



48225. 


00 


1600. 


00 


17000. 


00 


1800. 


00 


350. 


00 


100. 


00 


3000. 


00 


1500. 


00 


4500. 


00 


1400. 


00 


75. 


00 


300. 


00 


13000. 


00 


6000. 


00^ 


5000. 


00 


60000. 


00 


2500, 


00 


1000. 


00 


1100 


.00 


3ts) 2500. 


00 


2500 


.00 


6500 


.00 


6900 


.00 


3000 


.00 


3500.00 


15000 


.00 


1800 


.00 


750 


.00 


2500 


.00 


2500 


.00 


5000 


.00 


250 


.00 



charged consumers by the Town of Andover be increased twenty 
20 1 per cent over rates now established, details of changes to lie- 
left to the Board of Public Works, and it v. 

Voted, That the whole matter be referred to the Board of 

Public Works for careful consideration and report at the next 
annual town meeting. 

Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 5.10 p. m.. To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 5.11 p. m.. To refer to the Street Lighting Committa 

Voted, To take up Article 9 at this time in place of Article 6. 

Voted, at 5.22 p. m., That the Selectmen be instructed to 
petition the County Commissioners at once, to lay out Essex 
Street, so called, from the B. &M. R. R. tracks to a point about 
30 ft. beyond the Shawsheen Bridge, to alter, widen or re-locate 
said highway, or order specific repairs on the same, including the 
bridge or abutments of the bridge crossing Shawsheen River, in 
accordance with the Revised Laws. Chapter 48. Sections 1 and 
(J . and acts amendatory thereof, and for the purpose of widening 
the bridge a sum. not exceeding $2500. no be appropriated as the. 
Town's share of the cost, the amount required to be expended 
prior to November 1. 1918. 

Voted to take up Article 12. 

Voted, at 5.27 p. m.. That a sum not exceeding $250 be appro- 
priated to put in suitable condition the north room on the upper 
floor of the old Schoolhouse in Ballard vale, put in a stove, and 
provide such other furnishings as will come within the appro- 
priation, it being understood that the selectmen may grant the 
use oi this room to the Ballardvale Village Improvement Societv 
under such conditions as they may appn >ve. 

18 



By courtesy of the meeting, William Shaw presented the follow 
ing motion, which was voted : 

That the School Committee be requested to arrange so that 
children may be admitted to school privileges at the age of five 
years, upon the request of their parents, approved by the Super- 
intendent of Schools, the School physician, and the teacher of the 
First Grade. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 5.34., To indefinitely postpone. 

Voted to take up Articles 7 and 8 together. 

Voted, at 6.02 p. m., That the town appropriate the sum of 
$2500.00 for the purpose of installing a five-inch double suction 
pump, together with a 30-horsepower motor, and accessories, in 
the Pump Station on Bancroft Road. 

Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 6.04. p. m., That the Town appropriate a sum of 
money not exceeding $5000 to continue the macadam on Lowell 
Street, the same to equal an amount which the State and County 
will severally appropriate, and that the Selectmen be instructed 
to at once petition the State Highway Commission and the 
County Commissioners, that each appropriate the sum of $5000 
as the proportion of the expense of said continuation work to be 
borne by the State and County for the year 1918. 

Took up Article 1 1 . 

Voted, at 6.05 p. m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 6.06 p. m., To indefinitely postpone. 

19 



Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 6.07 p. m., To indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 15. 

Voted, at 6.08 p. m., That the pay of the firemen be $75.00 per 
year. 

Took up Article 16. 

Voted, at 6.09 p. m., That the taxes be collected by the Tax 
Collector and that he receive one per cent of all moneys collected 
and that interest be charged at the rate of six per cent per annum, 
from October 15th, on all taxes remaining unpaid after November 
1st. 

Took up Article 17. 

Voted, at 6.10 p. m., That the Town Treasurer, with the appro- 
val of the Selectmen, be and hereby is, authorized to borrow 
money from time to time, in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1st, 1918, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts 
incurred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. 

Took up Article 18. 

Voted, at 6.11 p. m., That all unexpended appropriations be 
turned into the treasury. 

Took up Article 19. 

Voted, at 6.12 p. m., That the report of the Town Officers be 
accepted. 

20 



Took up Article 20. 

Voted, at 6.13 p. m., To raise by taxation, $163,000 and also 
an amount sufficient to meet the State and County taxes. 

Took up Article 21. 

The following report was rendered by the Board of Health: 
To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : — 

At the Town Meeting in March 1917, the Board of Health was 
asked to report at this time on a plan for the disposal of garbage. 

Inasmuch as we have waived temporarily some of the re- 
strictions in regard to the keeping of hens and swine, and to 
further the interests of our citizens, even in a small way, in the 
conservation of all food material, also from the fact that the 
collectors of garbage are now licensed, we have thought it best 
to suggest to the Town that action upon this matter be deferred 
for at least a year. 

Voted, at 6.15 p. m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the Warrant and of the Officer's 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meet- 
ing. 

Attest, 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, 

Town Clerk 



21 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
Received from tuition and supplies 



S60000.00 
795.75 



60795,. 75 



Teachers' payroll 

Janitors' payroll 

Alvah Wright, transportation 

C. H. Newton, transportation 

B. & M. R. R., transportation 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, team hire 

C. H. Newton, spring water 
New England Tel. and Tel. 
Lawrence Gas Company 
Perley F. Gilbert 

Boston & Lowell Despatch Express 
American Express Co. 
Lawrence Lumber Co., supplies 
T. A. Holt Co., supplies 
J. H. Campion & Co., supplies 
\V. I. Morse, supplies 
Robert Hutcheson, supplies 
Board of Public Works, water 
Ginn & Co., supplies 

D. C. Heath & Co., supplies 
Buchan & Francis, supplies 
J. H. Hammett Co., supplies 
Milton, Bradley Co., supplies 
Iroquois Publishing Co., supplies 
Edward E. Babb & Co., supplies 

Amount carried forward 



$37045.93 

4605 . 26 

570.00 

456.00 

869.27 

100.00 

27.88 

83.16 

137.82 

28.80 

10.83 

32.61 

147.43 

38.97 

90,16 

142.23 

1.34 

338.66 

148.55 

185.16 

22.15 

109.53 

417.07 

4.90 

668.69 

$46282.40 



22 



Appropriation and Receipts $60795.75 

Amount brought forward 

Andover Press, printing and supplies 

G. B. Robbins Disinfecting Co., supplies 

H. I. Dallman Co., supplies 

Jonathan E. Holt, labor 

Arden Farm, supplies 

Cross Coal Co., coal 

Andover Coal Co., coal 

Bay State St. Ry. Co., transportation 

Henry C. Sanborn, supplies 

S. K. Ames, supplies 

Chandler & Barber, supplies 

Gaylord Brothers, supplies 

C. C. Richards & Co., supplies 
Lyons & Carnahan, supplies 
Herman. Goldberger, supplies 
American Book Co., supplies 
H. W. Johns Manville, supplies 
James McGhie, labor 
J. W. Richardson, labor 

D. Donovan & Son, labor 
Buchan & McNally, labor and supplies 
City of Lowell, tuition 
Myra A. Jones, labor 
Louis Ilgorsky, labor 
Anna Ilgorsky, labor 
Robert Winters, labor 
John Crowley, labor 
C. A. Hill & Co., labor and supplies 
West Disinfecting Co., supplies 
Smith & Dove Mfg. Co., supplies 
Hiller & Co., supplies 
S. S. Kresge Co., supplies 
Silver Burdett & Co., supplies 
Houghton Mifflin Co., supplies 

Amount carried forward 

23 



S46282. 


40 


284. 


75 


56. 


18 


79. 


12 


7. 


00 


41 


,25 


2115. 


06 


6149. 


51 


810 


00 


75. 


41 


19. 


58 


106 


94 


10 


95 


1 


.27 


2 


.55 


14 


.50 


55. 


,68 


65, 


00 


8, 


,00 


239 


,73 


8. 


38 


1452. 


42 


282. 


50 


6. 


80 


10. 


00 


10. 


00 


10. 


00 


4. 


50 


52. 


47 


47. 


,25 


6. 


,25 


i. 


63 


10. 


88 


29. 


49 


16. 


99 


S58380.44 



$60* - 

Amount brought forward : 1380.44 

-le Brown & Co.. supplies 
Benjamin H- Sanborn ^ pplies 

\ J. Bart uppli, 1000 

James J. Abbott, wood 
Paula S. Clough. supplies 

"r -: - V •: SoiB C« SUDpfiefi 

Daniel O'Xeal 

The Cutler Dickie Co., supp 

Tver Rubber Co.. suppli I 9 1^ 

Library Bureau, supplies 6 

Rockport Market. suppBt 

E. E. Gray Co.. suppl 8-40 

Unc Young, provisio: 44 

Chester D. Abbe pplies W.30 

Albert \Y. Lam pplies 

\V. H. Coleman & Co., supplic 
'manufacturing Equipment Co.. supplit 
mk E. Whiting, cleaning dock 10. 00 

Bride. Grimes & Co.. suppli-. 31 .41 

W. D. Walker, school physician 
Henry Lavery, labor 10-00 

John Mahoney, labor 

County of Essex, tuition 63.28 

C. Birchard & Co., supplies 

A. N. Palmer Co., supplies 16. 18 

Oliver Ditson Co., supplies 1 88 

^ssachusetts State Prison, supplies 

Toch Brothers, supplies 

George H. Hadley & Co., supp 10 00 

J. H. Playdon. supplies 3 °° 

lliam r r truant officer 100. 36 
David May, labor 

Alexander Mirault 3 - °° 

Amount carried forward *5 ; 



Appropriation and Receipts 
A mount brought forward 

George A. Christie 

Rubine Kilburn, labor 

(M. Wilson, labor 

Anderson & Bowman, labor 

Andrew Wilson & Co., supplies 

John H. Nicoll 

Leonard Saunders, labor 

Curtis Standard Research, supplies 

The MacMillan Co., supplies 

Somerville Brush Co., supplies 

H. B. McArdle, supplies 

Sidney P. White, labor 

W. A. Allen, supplies 

Martin Engraving Co., supplies 

Standard Oil Co., supplies 

John C. Collins, labor 

O. P. Chase, supplies 

Thiras Brothers, supplies 

Diamond Spring Water Co., supplies 

Grace S. Thomas, substituting 

Isabel Tobin, substituting 

J. F. Barnard 

Myerscough & Buchan, supplies 

Mrs. Joseph L. Burns 

Harvard University Press 

Allyn and Bacon, supplies 

Royal Typewriter Co., supplies 

L. C. Smith Bros., supplies 

Underwood Typewriter Co., supplies 

D. Appleton & Co., supplies 

Biological Supply Co., supplies 

Charles E. Merrill Co., supplies 

John C. Winston & Co., supplies 

Atkinson Mentzer & Co., supplies 

Amount carried forward 





S60795.75 


S59225 


.33 




.76 


2 


.00 


10 


.50 


2 


.10 


35 


.16 


10 


.00 


3 


.50 


5 


.96 


44 


.06 


10 


.15 


3 


.58 


29 


.00 


1 


.25 


9 


.80 


30 


.45 


281 


.32 




.30 


3 


,87 


18. 


95 


2 


50 


2. 


50 


87. 


90 




50 


2. 


00 




,75 


19 


.92 




50 


2. 


25 


8. 


03 


8. 


62 


7. 


00 


7. 


67 


11. 


93 


10, 


21 


9 





$59900.32 



25 



Appropriation, and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., supplies 

Masury Young Co., supplies 

The Gregg Publishing Co., supplies 

Rand & McNally Co., supplies 

Funk & Wagnalls Co., supplies 

James A. Eaton, supplies 

American Seating Co., supplies 

Merrimac Boiler Works, supplies 

Overmeadow Farm, supplies 

George E. Hussey, supplies 

S. T. Shattuck & Sons, labor 

City of Lawrence 

Philip L. Hardy, labor 

Anti-Dust Co., supplies 

Charles K. Ernst, supplies 

David Milne, labor 

Louis J. Kibbee, labor 

Edward S. Hardy, wood 

American Supplies Co., supplies 

The Prang Co., supplies 

LeRoy Phillips Publishing Co., supplies 

Hopkinson and Holden, supplies 

Reformatory for Women, supplies 

Total 
Balance 



$60795.75 



$59900.32 

21.59 

6.50 

6.58 

5.10 

2.75 

1.60 

6.00 

326.78 

3.60 

2.00 

30.00 

19.99 

188.89 

16.00 

66.00 

3.50 

10.00 

121.00 

4.99 

3.36 

2.06 

22.56 

18.35 

60789.52 
6.23 



S60795.75 $60795.75 



OLD SCHOOL HOUSE, BALLARDVALE 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
J. E. Pitman, as per contract 

Total expenditure 



$250.00 



$250.00 



S250.00 $250.00 



26 



NEW HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 



Balance from last year 


$1742.28 


Received from interest and sales 


84.93 


John W. Richardson 


S63 . 14 


James Wilkinson Co. 


31.49 


Chandler & Barber 


26.73 


Buchan & Francis 


130.75 


D. Donovan & Son 


22.40 


H. W. Johns Manville Co. 


49.00 


J. H. Mendell Co. 


615.01 


Fisher, Ripley & LeBoutillier 


461.61 


Suffolk Engraving Co. 


2.00 


Frank E. Dodge 


3.60 


George B. Petrie 


5.90 


Board Public Works 


82.54 


Cambridge Botanical Supply Co. 


306.48 


Kmil M. Zeichert 


18.23 


Total expenditure 


1818.88 


Balance to treasurer 


8.33 



S1827.21 S1827.21 



27 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 

Harry M. Eames, chairman selectmen 

Walter S. Donald, selectman 

Charles Bowman, selectman 

George A. Higgins, treasurer 

George A. Higgins, town clerk 

Alfred L. Ripley, moderator 

Nesbit G. Gleason, auditor 

Walter H. Coleman, auditor 

John S. Robertson, auditor 

Ira Hill, field driver 

William C. Crowley, sealer of weights 

and measures 
Registrars of Voters 
Precinct Officers, Precinct 1 
Precinct Officers, Precinct 2 
Election Officers, town meeting 
Smart & Flagg, bond for Treasurer and 

Collector 
Daniel J. Murphy, town counsel 
Collectors of Taxes 
Dr. J. J. Daly, town physician 

Total expenditure 
Balance 





$6900.00 


S700. 


00 


600. 


00 


600. 


00 


600. 


00 


900. 


00 


10. 


00 


50. 


00 


50. 


00 


50. 


00 


25. 


00 


172 


.83 


104 


.50 


142 


00 


80 


.00 


70 


.00 


230 


.00 


320 


.00 


1833 


.82 


200 


.00 


6738 


.15 


161 


.85 



$6900.00 $6900.00 



28 



TOWN HOUSE 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 

Receipts 

George W. Mears, janitor 

Holden Bros., painting 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 

High School Committee, radiator 

Lawrence Gas Co., gas and electricity 

L. Saunders, police duty 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co. 

W. I. Morse, supplies 

Frank M. Foster, labor on settees 

C. F. Emerson, carting ashes, etc. 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 

T. A. Holt Co., supplies 

Andover Coal Co., coal 

J. W. Richardson, repairs 

Frank L. Dodge, repairing boiler setting 

Gray & Kendall, repairs 

H. I. Dallman & Co., supplies 

Knipe Brothers, repairs on plumbing 

Theo Muise, repairs on flag 

Miss S. E. Riley, repairs on flag 

Cheshire Chemical Co., supplies 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

A. S. Manning, supplies 

Mendlick Bros., cell-room floor 

Sadie Hobbs, laundry 

Anderson & Bowman 

Amount carried forward 





S3000.00 




182.75 


S800. 


00 


63. 


20 


36. 


86 


8. 


00 


151. 


23 


4. 


50 




90 


27. 


62 


9. 


00 


17. 


50 


5. 


50 


12. 


19 


186. 


40 


1 


16 


4 


.25 


10 


74 


9 


.31 


71 


.78 


18 


.25 


5 


.50 


7 


.00 




.60 


1 


.15 


143 


.00 


7 


.86 




.25 


SI 603 


*- — 



29 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought fonvard 

David M. May, services 

J. E. Pitman, contract on cell-room 

W. H. Welch & Co., plumbing 

Total expenditure- 
Balance 





S3182 75 


SI 603. 75 




13.00 




1390.61 




150.00 




3157.36 




25.39 





S3182.75 $3182.75 






FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 


$9400.00 


Earnings of teams 


1412.70 


Sale of manure 


75.00 


Ivan E. Steadman, chauffeur 


S510.00 


George Dick, chauffeur 


1191.50 


Lester Hilton, chauffeur 


1182.00 


John Haggerty, driver 


1081. '60 


John Collins, chauffeur 


1030.00 


Joseph Smith, chauffeur 


35.50 


William Baker, driver 


529.00 


K. Spark, labor 


1.50 


J. Peso, labor 


1.00 


William Hatch, labor 


2.00 


A. Bliss, labor on wires 


2.50 


Z. Tardiff, labor on fire alarm 


1.50 


R. Bales, labor on fire alarm 


1.50 


F. Collins, labor on fire alarm 


5.00 


Curry Bros. Oil Co., oil 


18.14 


Andover Press, printing 


7.00 


Payroll Engine Co. No. 1 


1212.50 


W. H. Coleman Co., supplies 


10.71 


John Haggerty, telephone 


25.44 


P. J. Hannon, hay- 


37.10 


Sinclair Refining Co., gasoline 


35.00 


Myerscough & Buchan, oil 


4.17 


George A. Brown, supplies 


22.50 


Payroll Engine Co., No. 2 


635.00 


Lester Hilton, labor on fire alarm 


1.50 


H. M. Eames, hay 


120.75 



Amount carried forward 



$7704.41 $10887.70 



31 



Appropriation and Receipts $10887.70 

Amount brought forward S7704.41 

S. T. Shattuck, teaming .90 

P. Murnane, janitor 100.00 

John F. Riley, engineer 100.00 

Walter I. Morse, engineer 100.00 

Charles S. Buchan, chief engineer 150.00 

John W. Richardson, labor 10.02 

A. M. Colby, repairs 18.95 
Robert Jackson, labor 8.00 
Board of Public Works, water 34.68 
Fred Peck, labor 2.00 
Frank A. Davis, labor 2 . 00 
Frederick Hulme 10.00 
Boston and Lawrence Despatch, express 1 .47 
Boston Woven Hose Co., fire hose 20.38 
Motor Parts Co., supplies 5.90 
Standard Oil Co., gasoline 87.73 
Smith & Dove Mfg. Co. 1 . 25 
T. F. Morrissey & Son 38 . 85 
Lawrence Gas Co., gas and electricity 80.42 
P. J. Daly & Co., supplies 10. 75 
American Express Co., express 8.77 
Ralph L. Greenwood 10.00 

B. &M. R. R., freight 1.00 
Tyer Rubber Co., blowing fire whistle 100.00 
Tyer Rubber Co., supplies 1 . 88 
Knipe Brothers, supplies and repairs 45.71 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies and repairs 32.66 
Fred Adams, labor 4 . 00 
C. S. Buchan . 73 
Andover Coal Co. 643 . 04 
Anderson & Bowman, shoeing horses, etc. 119.50 
E. W. Boutwell, hay 148 . 16 
E. McCabe & Co., repairs on boiler 5.60 
A. S. Manning, supplies 103.76 



A mount carried forward $9712.52 

32 



Appropriation and Receipts vS10887.70 

A mount brought forward S97 12.52 

T. A. Holt Co., supplies 131.65 

J. H. Campion & Co., supplies 12.09 

R. M. Haynes, supplies 133.01 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 59.34 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 32.05 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 12.35 
New England Tel. and Tel. Co. telephones 48.44 

Ira Buxton, engineman 50.00 

Ira Buxton 26.35 

A. W. Lowe, horse medicine 1.36 

Andover Steam Laundry 28 . 96 

J. E. Pitman, labor and supplies 44.22 
American La France Engine Co., supplies 278.07 

Poor & Riley, supplies 183.52 

John L. Morrison, shoeing horses, etc. 79.45 

The Dayton Tire Co., tires 563.56 

Gamewell Fire Alarm & Tel. Co. 1 .88 

Crowley & Co., horse medicine 5 . 26 

Benjamin Jaques, wood 3.50 



Total expenditure 1 1407 . 58 

Transferred from Miscellaneous 519.88 



S11407.58 S11407.58 



33 



BRUSH FIRES 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 


$600.00 


Received from B. & M. Railroad 


123.90 


William Baker, et al 


$2.50 


C. S. Harnden, et al 


9.75 


C. L. Bailey, et al 


3.75 


C. A. Hill, etal 


21.50 


A. Bliss Jr., et al 


60.25 


John A. Riley, et al 


66.50 


Henry Piatt, et al 


57.00 


American La France Fire Engine Co. 


15.00 


\Y. H. Coleman & Co. 


4.00 


Charles S. Buchan, et al 


109.75 


Poor & Riley, shovels 


15.75 


Joseph Terry, printing 


5.50 


George Dunnells, et al 


62.00 


Lester Hilton, et al 


55 . 75 


C. W. Flanders 


.80 


Louis Kibbee, et al 


57.00 


P. E. Livingston, et al 


8.00 


S. T. Shattuck & Son 


6.25 


H. Murphy, et al 


30.00 


Fred Collins, et al 


6.00 


George Clemons, et al 


39.50 


Fire Department, supplies 


51.30 


Total expenditures 


687.85 


Balance unexpended 


36.05 



S723.90 $723.90 



34 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 

County Treasurer, killing dogs 

Frank M. Smith, chief, and use of team 

James Napier, night police 

William L. Frye, night police 

Daniel P. Webster, day police 

Ralph Bruce, policeman 

Thomas Daly, policeman 

Charles A. Hill, supplies 

Dr. W. D. Walker, services 

Holden Brothers 

F. M. Smith, meals for prisoners 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Traffic Sign & Signal Co., silent policeman 

Andover Press, printing 

Frank L. Cole, coat 

Dionecio Michelini 

Frank Carse, police duty 

Theo Muise, repairs on coats 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies 

S. T. Shattuck 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

George C. Dunnells, police duty 

Gray & Kendall, supplies 

Myerscough & Buchan, auto hire 

Buchan & Francis 

Andover Steam Laundry 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

David M. May, police duty 

Amount carried forward 





84500.00 




44.00 


S1375.00 




1070.00 




1070.00 




272.00 




72.00 




73.00 




13.55 




10.00 




7.00 




11.25 




7.85 




7.80 




10.80 




12.50 




.70 




25.05 




24.85 




11.85 




9.00 




77.43 




48.50 




i .90 




23.48 




.25 




1.40 




4.45 




52.00 





$4292.61 S4544.00 



35 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

R. J. Macartney 

M. T. Welch, police duty 

O. P. Chase 

John Stack, police duty 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

Thos. F. Morrissey & Son, auto hire 

American Express Co. 

James Walker, police duty 

Leonard Saunders, police duty 

F. Valentine, police duty 

Anderson & Bowman, supplies 

James Napier, meals for prisoners 

William C. Brown, police duty 

Leonard Saunders, killing dogs 

Charles Newton, police duty 

Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 





S4544.00 


vS4292.61 




39.76 




100.10 




.22 




13.00 




4.20 




174.25 




.92 




94.70 




63.64 




15.00 




1.50 




5.10 




16.50 




44.00 




8.00 




4873.50 






329.50 



$4873.50 $4873.50 



36 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 

Reading Sanitarium 

Charles H. Newton, inspector of meat 

And over Press, printing 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, auto hire 

Charles H. Newton, cattle inspector 

B. T. Haynes, member Board of Health 

B. T. Haynes, sundries 

Massachusetts Assn. Boards of Health 

H. H. Nevers 

James P. Nolan, inspector plumbing 

Dr. C. E. Abbott, secretary 

Dr. C. E. Abbott, postage and sundries 

Dr. C. E. Abbott, fumigation 

Lawrence Tuberculosis Hospital 

Charles Litchfield, scarlet fever 

Knipe Bros., labor 

B. O. Pinkham 

City of Haverhill 

Franklin H. Stacey, Board of Health 

Franklin H. Stacey, milk inspector 

Board of Health, postage and sundries 

Board of Health 

Hobbs & Warren 





$1500.00 


$64. 


58 


130. 


00 


7. 


55 


5. 


50 


250. 


00 


50. 


00 


8. 


82 


2. 


50 


6. 


00 


54. 


00 


75. 


00 


13. 


50 


134. 


50 


267 


.27 


48 


.00 


14 


.00 


15 


.00 


24 


.00 


50 


.00 


75 


.00 


32 


.64 


57 


.17 


2 


.82 



Total expenditure 1387 . 85 

Balance 112.15 



$1500.00 $1500.00 



37 



PRINTING ANl) STATIONERY 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 




$1400.00 


Burroughs Adding Machine Co. 




$8.00 


Carter Ink Co. 




1.25 


Andover Press 




1122.32 


J. H. McDonald, stamps, etc. 




198.97 


Wright & Potter Publishing Co., 


, printing 


10.75 


Henry M. Musk Publishing Co., 


printing 


3.00 


Hobbs & Warren, printing 




9.00 


P. B. Murphy, printing 




3.25 


H. M. Meserve, printing 




6.03 


E. Sellars, typewriting 




10.00 


R. A. Todd Paper Co., paper 




2.76 


A. W. Brownell 




.75 


Sengbusch Inkstand Co., inkstai 


ids . 


3.42 


Total expenditure 


1379.50 


Balance 




20.50 



$1400.00 $1400.00 



38 



GYPSY AND BROWNTAIL MOTH 
DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 $3000.00 

Sales of Supplies and Private Work 2700. 15 

Payrolls $2786.19 

Gray & Kendall, repairs . 85 

American Express Company 1 . 23 

Wm. H. Welch & Co., supplies 4.60 

John L. Morrison, storing sprayer 105.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 10.80 

W. M. Farwell, arsenate of lead 89.40 
S. T. Shattuck, labor and storage of sprayers 289.33 

Anderson & Bowman, labor 4.30 

Freeman Abbott, hauling sprayer 273.60 

Samuel Cabot, supplies 13.86 

City of Maiden, lead 180.85 

W. I. Morse, supplies 53.19 

American La France Engine Co.-, repairs 3 . 50 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 1 .45 

Fitzhenry Guptil Co., lead and sulphur 22.50 

Buchan & McNally, supplies .40 

John H. Playdon, superintendent 150.00 

Dow Chemical Co., arsenate of lead 1332.00 

Sherman Williams Co., supplies 36. 12 

Martin Doherty, storage 60.00 

W. H. Coleman, gasoline 103.72 



Total expenditure 5222.89 

Balance 177.26 



S5700.15 $5700.15 



3<> 



TREE WARDEN 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 $500.00 



Payrolls 


$372.73 


Lawrence Lumber Co. 


4.50 


Follansbee Nursery Co., trees 


37.50 


\V. I. Morse, supplies 


1.82 


Fire Department 


4.50 


Gray & Kendall, ftiing saws. etc. 


6.65 


Total expenditure 


427.70 


Balance 


72.30 



S500.00 $500.00 



40 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 




S2500.0O 


Sale of lots 




787.50 


Care of lots 




553.50 


Interments 




376.26 


Foundations 




122.71 


Sundries 




129.06 


Payrolls 


$3538.16 




E. Lundgren, acting superintendent 


100.00 




C. L. Wilson, self and team 


7.50 




People's Ice Co., ice 


39.00 




F. A. Gould, self and teams 


53.67 




F. L. Dodge, mason work 


13.30 




A. J. Kushin Co., stump puller 


109.75 




0. P. Chase, sundries 


.20 




A. S. Manning, fertilizer 


54.25 




Anderson & Bowman, repairs 


2.80 




W. I. Morse, supplies 


263.04 




Edith Sellars, clerical work ' 


100.00 




Buchan & McNally, supplies 


2.95 




John W. Bell, sundries 


2.00 




A. M. Colby, notices 


1.75 




Joseph C. Terry, printing 


4.25 




John L. Morrison, repairs 


13.00 




Board Public Works, water 


8.77 




J. H. Playdon, shrubs 


33.10 




W. L. Johnson 


16.50 




Total expenditure 


4363.99 




Balance 


105.04 





$4469.03 $4469.03 



41 



INSURANCE 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 S2000.00 

Appropriation, Workmen's Compensation 1600.00 

Dividends 39 . 64 

Smart & Flagg, agents, insurance S2013.62 

Smart & Flagg, Workmen's Compensation 2154.27 



Total expenditure 4167.89 

Transferred from Miscellaneous 528.25 



S4167.89 $4167.89 



HAY SCALES 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 $125.00 

John W. Richardson, repairs $3 . 73 

William C. Brown, weigher 100.00 



Total expenditure 103.73 

Balance 21.27 



S125.00 $125.00 



42 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
Lawrence Gas Co. 
Balance 


$6500.00 
$6262.39 
237.61 



S6500.00 $6500.00 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 $350.00 

June 3, Moses L. Farnham, Quartermaster S350 . 00 



Total expenditure 



$350.00 $350.00 



43 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Appropriation, March 4, 1918 $1800.00 

F. S. Boutwell, treasurer Memorial Hall 

Library $1800.00 



Total expenditure S1800.00 $1800.00 



POST 99, G. A. R. 

Appropriation, March 4, 1918 $100. 00 

April 29, Paid Moses L. Farnham Quar- 
termaster SI 00. 00 



Total expenditure $100. 00 $100. 00 



SEWER SINKING FUND 

Appropriation, March 4, 1918 $1000.00 

Thos. E. Rhodes, Treas. Sinking Fund 81000.00 



Total expenditure SI 000. 00 $1000. 00 



WATER SINKING FUND 

Appropriation, March 4, 1918 $750.00 

Thos. E. Rhodes, Treas. Sinking Fund $750.00 



Total expenditure $750.00 $750.00 

44 



STATE TAX AND HIGHWAY TAX 



Andover's proportion of State Tax 
Andover's proportion of Highway Tax 
Charles L. Burrill, Treas. and Receiver 
General 

Total expenditure 



$22000.00 
4629.50 



$26629.50 



$26629.50 $26629.50 



COUNTY TAX 



Andover's proportion of County Tax $15597 . 70 

David I. Robinson, County Treasurer $15597.70 



Total expenditure 



$15597.70 $15597.70 



DOG TAX 



Received from County Treasurer 
Paid F. S. Boutwell, Treasurer Memorial 
Hall 



$621.13 



$621.13 



Total expenditure 



$621.13 $621.13 



+5 



NOTES GIVEN 



Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, 

due Nov. 18, Rate 5.44 
Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, 

due Nov. 22, Rate 5.44 
Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, 

due Nov. 22, Rate 5.44 
Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, 

due Nov. 29, Rate 5.44 
Alar. 16, Andover National Bank, 

due Dec. 6, Rate 5.44 
Mar. 16, Andover National Bank. 

due Dec. 13, Rate 5.44 
Mar. 16, Andover National Bank, 

due Dec. 13, Rate 5.44 
Aug. 5, Andover National Bank, 

due Dec. 10, Rate 4.25 

Total Notes issued 



Note No. 44. 
Note No. 45, 
Note No. 46. 
Note No. 47, 
Note No. 48, 
Note No. 49, 
Note No. 50, 
Note No. 51, 



S20000.00 

10000.00 

10000.00 

15000.00 

15000.00 

5000.00 

5000.00 

20000.00 

S 100000. 00 



46 



NOTES PAID 



Nov. 18, Andover National Bank, 
Andover National Bank, 
Andover National Bank, 
Andover National Bank, 
Andover National Bank, 
Andover National Bank, 
Andover National Bank, 
Andover National Bank, 

Total Notes paid 



Note No. 


44 


$20000.00 


Note No. 


45 


10000.00 


Note No. 


.46 


10000.00 


Note No. 


47 


15000.00 


Note No. 


48 


15000.00 


Note No. 


49 


5000.00 


Note No. 


50 


5000.00 


Note No. 


51 


20000.00 




S 100000. 00 



INTEREST 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
Interest on deposits 

Paid 229 Water Bonds Coupons at $20.00 
Paid 91 Water Bonds Coupons at $17.50 
Paid 203 Sewer Bonds Coupons at $20.00 
Paid 210 High School Bonds Coupons at 

$20.00 
Paid 30 Andover Loan Act Bonds Cou- 
pons at $20.00 
Interest on Notes 44 to 56 inclusive 

Total expenditure 

Transferred from Miscellaneous 



SI 


7000.00 




775.41 


S4580.00 




1592.50 




4060.00 




4200.00 




600.00 




3339.56 




18372.06 






596.65 



$18372.06 $18372.06 



48 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 

Water 

Punchard School 

Andover Loan Act 
Abbott Village Sewer Assessment 

Mar. 28, Old Colony Trust Co., Water 

Bond 
Apr. 13, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

Water Bond No. 216 
Apr. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., Water 

Bond No. 334 
June 4, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

2 Water Bonds No. 240, 250 
June 28, Old Colony Trust Co., 5 Sewer 

Bonds, No. 151 to 155 
June 28 Old Colony Trust Co., 2 Water 

Bonds 
June 28, Old Colony Trust Co., 1 High 

School Bond, No. 101 
Aug. 28, Old Colony Trust Co., 1 Water 

Bond, No. 317 
Sept. 27, Old Colony Trust Co., 5 High 

School Bonds, No. 6 to 10 
Oct. 26, Old Colony Trust Co., 5 Ando- 
ver Loan 
Nov. 13, Geo. A. Higgins, Treas., paid 

5 Water Bonds, 141 to 145 





$13000 


00 




6000 


00 




5000. 


00 




5000 


00 


S 1000. 00 






1000.00 






1000.00 






2000.00 






5000.00 






2000.00 






1000.00 






1000.00 






5000.00 






5900.00 






5000.00 







Total S29000.00 S29000.00 



49 



RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 S300.00 

James Saunders S300.00 



PUBLIC DUMP 



50 



Total expenditure S300 . 00 S300 . 00 



Appropriation, March 4. 1918 S75.00 

Olof Benson S75.00 



Total expenditure S75 . 00 S75 . 00 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co. 

American Express Co. 

Andover National Bank, safe deposit box 

Dr. E. C. Conroy, return of births 

Dr. C. E. Abbott, return of births 

Dr. J.J. Daly, return of births 

Dr. E. D. Lane, return of births 

Dr. W. D. Walker, return of births 

Dr. P. J. Look, return of births 

C. F. Keefe, return of deaths 

Conlin & Ryan, return of deaths 

M.J. Mahoney, return of deaths 

E. M. Lundgren, return of deaths 

George C. Dunnells 

S. T. Shattuck 

W. L. Frye, constable 

C. W. Flanders, lunch for counters 

George A. Leek, photo of Essex Street 

Patrick J. Barrett 

Lilla D. Stott, probate and registry returns 

Ira B. Hill 

W. & L. E. Gurley, supplies for sealer 

Madeleine Hewes, clerical work 

J. E. Pitman, work on old Ballardvale 

schoolhouse 
City of Lawrence, settlement of claim 
H. M. Meserve & Co. 



Amount carried forward $861 . 14 

51 





S3000.00 


$8. 


01 


1. 


41 


5. 


00 




50 


2. 


25 


3. 


25 


4. 


50 


10. 


75 


8. 


75 


1. 


25 


1 


.25 


5, 


00 


21 


.00 


3 


.00 




.50 


5 


.00 


7 


.25 


7 


.50 


3 


.00 


41 


.45 


4 


.00 


2 


.98 


63 


.25 


68 


.81 


573 


.85 


7 


.93 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 

Amount brought forward 

John Franklin, plan of Essex Street 

T. F. Daly, constable 

Myerscough & Buchan, auto hire for 

registrars 
T. F. Morrissey & Son, auto hire 
Dr. E. D. Lane, medical services 
W. F. Gledhill, fish warden 
Bureau of Statistics 
B. & M. R. R., tickets 
Review of Record Co. 
Land Commissioners 

Todd Protectograph Co., check protector 
Expenses incurred by selectmen 
Farley Awning Co., decorating Town Hall 
J. H. Playdon 

Geo. A. Higgins, sundry expenses 
J. A. Riley, attendance on registrars 



sS3000.00 



S861.44 

6.00 
5.00 

6.00 
33.00 

9.00 
10.00 
16.00 
51.35 

5.00 

3.00 
39.20 
12.75 
71.90 
10.00 
30.25 
15.85 



Total expenditure 


1185.74 


Transferred to Interest 


596.65 


Transferred to Fire Department 


519.88 


Transferred to Insurance 


528.25 


Balance 


169.48 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



-j 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The Overseers of the Poor submit the following report for the 
year ending December 31, 1918: — 

Since 1908 the Town of Andover has been most fortunate in 
having as superintendent and matron at the Town Farm, Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Swan ton, and it was with regret that we received 
their resignation, for during the ten years that they have had 
charge of our almshouse, they not only have performed their 
duties in a manner most satisfactory to your Overseers, but by 
their ever kind and painstaking treatment had endeared them- 
selves to those committed to their care. Especially is this true 
of Mrs. Swanton, who possessed peculiar ability for the successful 
discharge of the complicated and oftentimes difficult duties of 
her position as matron. 

We appointed Mr. and Mrs. William Hooten to take charge of 
the almshouse. They had been employed in a similar institution 
in Methuen and came highly recommended. 

The business affairs of the almshouse and farm have as hereto- 
fore been well conducted; the house continues to be a model of 
neatness and good order throughout. 

The expenses of the past year as shown in the accounts are 
about the same as in 1917. ''Poverty they say is cheap," but it 
costs our generous town a large sum of money every year, and 
the calls for aid will doubtless be as great, if not more, for the 
next year, judging from the present business outlook, and the 
greater number who will need employment. 

At the time our almshouse was built, it was not termed alms- 
house, but workhouse, and the inmates were young, middle- 
aged, old and mildly insane, and during the years these condi- 
tions prevailed it was a model building for this purpose, and was 
so deemed by the State officials as shown in their reports; but 
with the change in State laws, the personnel of our inmates has 
changed: "no children, no insane"; principally those who are 

.S3 



advanced in years, with no one to care for them and it would 
seem that the present building, containing some sixty rooms of 
various kinds, is larger than is needed, and that some plan could 
be devised whereby without reducing the efficiency, the expense 
of this department could be reduced ; and we would suggest that 
a committee of three be appointed to consider the matter and 
report at the next annual town meeting. 

HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Overseers of the Poor 



54 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
Receipts from Town Farm 



J. H. Campion & Co., groceries 

S. K. Ames, supplies 

Lindsay & Young, provisions 

Lawrence Gas Co. 

T. A. Holt Co., groceries 

H. Bruckman, grain 

A. B. Sutherland Co., dry goods 

A. S. Manning, groceries 

Rockport Fish Market, fish 

Andover Coal Co. 

John D. Blackshaw, supplies 

Thiras Brothers, supplies 

T. F. Morrissey & Son, straw 

Frank L. Holt, labor 

Percy J. Look, medical service 

John Curtin, provisions 

A. M. Colby, supplies 

C. A. Hill & Co., electric ironer 

John L. Morrison, blacksmith work 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co. 

Buchan & Francis, supplies 

O. P. Chase, supplies 

Andover Board of Public Works, water 

Andrew Basso, supplies 

Andover Press, supplies 

A mount carried forward 





$4500.00 




1355.43 




$5855.43 


$48.98 




17.53 




372.82 




187.71 




631.94 




261.12 




71.37 




268.69 




83.33 




410.87 




1.00 




1.25 




7.60 




89.75 




5.00 




47.34 




6.40 




133.24 




2.25 




3.58 




38.16 




17.54 


- 


70.03 




26.68 




6.50 




$2810.68 





55 



Appropriation and Receipts $5855 . 43 

A mount brought forward . $2810.68 

George A. Brown, shoes and repairing 30.50 

Hiller & Co., supplies 35.01 

Peter Henderson & Co., seeds 14. 20 

Anderson & Bowman, blacksmith work 28.95 

Theo Muise, supplies 1 . 50 

Chester D. Abbott, supplies 18.00 

Charles Robinovitz, shoes 13 . 25 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 29 . 80 

Walter I. Morse, hardware 19.56 

F. Orris Rea, supplies 20.75 

Frank E. Whiting, supplies 2 . 00 

Beach Soap Co., supplies 28.49 

Robert Hutcheson, fish 2.45 

H. F. Chase, supplies 2.00 

Frank L. Cole, clothing 12. 10 

Providence Churning Co., supplies 59.85 

Armour & Co., supplies 4.50 

F. C. Small & Co., groceries 107.99 

J. E. Pitman, supplies 4.50 

Reid & Hughes, dry goods 84.99 

Albert W. Lowe, drugs 43.50 

D. F. Chase, provisions 44.69 

Family Shoe Store, shoes 6. 70 

T. H.> Lane & Son, clothing 15.80 

Charles Stone, supplies 1 . 50 

A. B. Loomer, provisions 89.76 

Charles Melamed, pasturing heifers 28.00 

Annie W. Swanton, labor S3 . 33 

Crowley & Co., drugs 48.25 

Walter C. Boyce, pasturing heifers 21.25 

Charles F. Emerson, labor 1 . 38 

Lawrence Lumber Co., supplies 7.95 

Herbert Lewis, labor 40.74 

Lawrence Telegram, advertising 1 . 05 



A mount carried forward $3 7 64 . 9 7 

56 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 

People's Ice Co., ice 

J. P. Wakefield, provisions 

G. A. Yunggebauer, provisions 

Fred A. Swanton, superintendent 

William Hooton, superintendent 

Mrs. Lulu Whitman, labor 

Isabella Sinclair, labor 

Bertha Johnson, labor 

Jeremiah Doucette, labor 

Mrs. McEwan, labor 

G. E. Gillespie, labor 

Daniel J. Sharp, labor 

Lewis J. Kibbee, labor 

Alice J. Kimball, labor 

Mary Myers, labor 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$5855 . 43 



$3764.97 

65.00 

14.17 

6.57 

666.67 

133.33 

33.14 

337.86 

278.00 

3.15 

6.63 

7.70 

10.00 

6.00 

55.00 

23.75 

5411.94 
443.49 



$5855 . 43 $5855 . 43 



ALMSHOUSE REPAIRS 

Appropriation, March 4, 1918 

Walter I. Morse, hardware $16. 15 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 1 . 05 

W. T. Locke, labor 26.50 

Frank E. Dodge, labor and supplies 29. 15 

Lawrence Lumber Co., labor 7.50 

Buchan <& McNally, labor and supplies 32.79 

J. E. Pitman, supplies 16.62 

Merrimack Boiler Co., supplies 18.35 



$300.00 



Total expenditure 
Balance 



148.11 
151.89 



$300.00 $300.00 



5 7 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
Total expenditure 
Balance 



SI 100. 00 



S1025.77 

74.23 



STATE AID 



snoo. oo snoo. oo 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
Total expenditure 
Balance 



S2500.00 



S 1949. 00 
551.00 



S2500.00 S2500.00 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
Town cases 

On account other cities 
On account of State 

Total expenditure 
Due from cities 
Due from State 



Net expenditure 
Balance 



S500.00 





S266.00 
739.00 
430.00 


S510.66 
540.67 


1435 . 00 
1051.33 






383.67 
116.33 



S500.00 S500.00 



58 



RELIEF OUT OF ALMSHOUSE 



Appropriation, March 4, 1918 
Paid out of almshouse 
Paid other cities and towns 
Paid State 
Paid on account State 

Total expenditure 
Due town from State 

Net expenditure 
Balance 





$4300.00 


S3290.39 




57.34 




148.00 




270.83 




S3766.56 




232.83 




3533.73 




766.27 





S4300.00 $4300.00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMSHOUSE 



House furniture 
Clothing 
Farm stock 
Farm tools 
Farm produce 
Fuel 
Provisions 



S1375.00 
300.00 
720.00 
350.00 
440.00 
490.00 
125.00 



S3800.00 



59 



FARM CASH REPORT 
FROM JANUARY 1, 1918. TO NOVEMBER 1. 1918 



Received for 






Cows 


S570.00 




Milk 


32.64 




Calves 


13.50 




Pigs 


258.00 




Fowl 


32.10 




Eggs 


51.10 




Hay 


31.19 




Lumber 


89.92 




Board of inmates 


248.42 




Paid Town Treasurer to balance 




1326.87 




S1326.87 


$1326.87 


FRED A. 


SWANTON, 






Superintendent 



FROM NOVEMBER 1, 1918 TO DECEMBER 31, 1918 

Received for 

Milk S7.56 

Calf 5.00 

Board 16.00 

Paid Town Treasurer to balance 28.56 



S28.56 $28.56 

WILLIAM HOOTON, 

Superintendent 



60 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual 


report. 


Number of male polls assessed 


2025 


Personal estate 


S1738275.00 


Real estate 


6279425.00 




^301 7700 00 




oOUl / / uu . uu 


Poll tax 


$4050.00 


Tax on personal property 


38679.27 


Tax on real estate 


139721.83 




qiq-Mci in 


Rate of taxation per S1000, $22.25 


OloZ-tO 1 . 1U 


Number of 




Horses assessed 


532 


Cows assessed 


1037 


Cattle other than cows assess 1 


304 


Sheep assessed 


22 


Swine assessed 


257 


Fowl assessed 


10492 


Dwellings assessed 


1673 


Acres of land assessed 


17851 



HARRY M. EAMES 
WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 

Assessors of Andover 



61 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: — In compliance with the regulations of the Fire 
Department I submit the following report from January 1, 1918, 
to January 1, 1919. During this time 82 bell alarms, 9 still 
alarms, and 2 out-of-town calls were answered. Apparatus at 
Central Station answered 75 bell, 11 still, and 2 out-of-town calls. 

Combination No. 1 traveled 373 miles; Combination No. 2 
traveled 131 miles; Ladder No. 1, 41 miles. We have laid 16,500 
feet of 23^-inch hose, 1600 feet of 54-inch hose, raised 571 feet of 
ladders, and used 1090 gallons of chemicals. 

In answering grass and brush fires the apparatus traveled 346 
miles, laid 4950 feet of 2}^-inch hose, 750 feet of %-inch hose, 
and used 624 gallons of chemicals. 

Value of buildings and contents where fires occurred, 
S639,974.82; loss on buildings and contents, 822.368.14; insurance 
on buildings and contents, $550,749.00. 

During the past year there were 14 fires reported that the 
department was not called. on, with a loss of 8391.00 and in- 
surance $35,820.00. 

The working force of the department consists of three en- 
gineers, four permanent men, and sixteen call men at Central 
Station; one permanent man and eight call men at Hose No. 2, 
Ballardvale. The apparatus in working order consists of one 
Auto Combination Chemical Truck, one Combination Pumping 
and Chemical Truck, one Fourth Class Amoskeag Fire Engine, 
one two-horse Ladder Truck, one two-horse Hose Wagon, one 
spare two-horse Wagon, and one two-horse Pung. 

There are about 4500 feet of hose in good condition. 
The fire alarm is in good condition, but during the coming year 
part of the battery system will have to be replaced at an esti- 

62 



mated cost of $100.00. Also, very soon the old wire on the 
system will have to be replaced with new. 

The earnings of the horses and drivers, rent of shed, and sale 
of manure for the past year was about $1487.70. 

During the past year the cost of tires and repairs on tires was 
S616.27, and can be honestly charged up to brush fires, as they 
were almost new at the beginning of the new year. 

We feel that the present apparatus is too heavy and expensive 
to run to brush fires, and recommend that a chassis be purchased 
and the body of the spare hose wagon be fitted to it and be 
equipped for brush-fire work. 

We also recommend that some time in the near future the town 
purchase an auto ladder truck. The upkeep of the horse-drawn 
apparatus the past year at the Central Station was $458.27, and 
at Hose No. 2, Ballardvale, was $553.03. The expense of keeping 
a motor truck would be about $50.00 for gasoline and oil, and 
this would be a great saving over the horse-drawn apparatus. 

Owing to the high cost of everything pertaining to the upkeep 
of the department, we recommend the appropriation of $10,000 
for the ensuing year, together with the earnings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER I. MORSE 

Chief Engineer 



63 



POLICE DEPARTMEMT 



REPORT OF CHIEF 

To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the report of the Police 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1918. 

Whole number of arrests, 120. Males, 116. Females, 4. 

Offenses for Which Arrests Were Madi<: 

Non-Support 1 

Manslaughter 3 

Larceny 20 

Violating Automobile Law 7 

Drunk 15 

Common drunk 3 

Assault 5 

Delinquency 29 

Malicious mischief 2 

Vagrancy 3 

Insane 5 

Peddling without license 1 

Violation of Town ordinance 3 

Trespass 1 

Stubborn child 2 

Out-of-town officers 6 

Having no card of registration 2 

Concealing stolen property 1 

Violation Board of Health rules 6 

Deserters from Army and Navy 2 

Failing to file questionnaire 1 

Indecent language 1 

Unlicensed dog 1 

64 



DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Essex County Training School 1 

Returned to Army 2 

Continued 8 

Committed to House of Correction 5 

Committed to insane asylum 5 

Discharged 18 

Held for Grand Jury 2 

Paid fines 25 

On probation 18 

On file 18 

Committed to State Infirmary 3 

Defaulted 3 

To Lyman School 1 

To Shirley School 1 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Fines paid in lower court S 302 . 00 

Burglaries reported 18 

Doors found open and secured 71 

Dogs killed 44 

Value of property stolen 2900 . 00 

Value of property recovered 2000. 00 

Value of Police equipment 500.00 

SUPERIOR COURT FINDINGS 

Nol-prossed 1 

On probation 2 

No bill found 3 

Held for trial 1 

Cases pending 2 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Chief of Polity 



65 



w 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Your trustees are again called upon to record the loss of one 
of their valued and esteemed members during the year, John W. 
Bell, a man who gave much of his time, counsel and assistance 
to the development of the cemetery. 

At the annual meeting last March an appropriation of $1500 
was granted to the trustees for the purpose of resuming the work 
commenced in 1917 on the east side. Fifty-five lots were laid 
out and considerable construction work on avenues was done this 
last year. Nearly half of the lots laid out have already been sold 
and your Board of Trustees ask for an appropriation of $2000 in 
addition to the regular appropriation of $1000, and the proceeds 
from the sale of lots and other receipts for work done in the 
cemetery. I 

GEORGE D. MILLETT 
WALTER I. MORSE 
DANIEL H. POOR 
WARREN L. JOHNSON 
JOHN W. STARK 
FRED E. CHEEVER 

Board of Trustees 



66 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY STATISTICS 

Lots sold as per last report 
Lots sold in 1918 

Total lots sold 

Total number of single graves sold 
Interments as per last report 
Interments in 1918 

Total interments 



December 31, 1918 







17 






4& 






185 






1326 






81 






1407 




W. 


L MORSE 


Clerk 


of 


Board of Trustees 



67 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 



The trees in the center of the town are in good condition. We 
have done some trimming, removed dead trees, and planted 
some that were needed. I would like to call attention to the 
growth of brush in the outlying districts, which has grown sq 
close to the road that it is impossible for vehicles to pass each 
other in safety. I have had numerous complaints regarding 
this, and would ask the town to appropriate the sum of $500 to 
be used by the Tree Warden to improve these conditions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

' EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 



68 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



I am pleased to say that the Browntail Moth is now almost 
extinct and there is also a steady decrease in the Gypsy Moth 
nests this season in the residential section of the town, as during 
the spraying season good weather prevailed, with good results in 
the decrease of nests. Owing to the high cost of material and 
shortage of labor, we were obliged to curtail on the amount of 
work to be done in the outlying districts. I am a firm believer 
in spraying for the suppression of all leaf-eating insects, and I 
would recommend that that branch of the work be continued, 
as it is the most economical way to handle this pest, and in order 
that the condition of the town shall continue, I would ask that the 
sum of $3500 (thirty-five hundred dollars) be appropriated for 
this department. 

Respectfully, 

J. H. PLAYDON 

Local Moth Superintendent 



69 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: — I hereby submit my report for the year be- 
ginning November 15, 1917, and ending November 15, 1918. 
Number of cattle inspected 1359 

Number of stables inspected 156 

Number of cows condemned because affected with 

tuberculosis 16 

Number of stables disinfected 16 

Number of interstate cattle identified and released 95 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. NEWTON 

Inspector of Animals 



70 



CORNELL FUND 



Receipts 

Amount of Fund 
Deposited in Savings Banks 
Balance from last account 
Income 



Expenditures 



Paid for coal and wood 
Balance on hand 



842.64 
237.50 



85000.00 
5000.00 



280.14 



S127.28 
152.86 



280.14 



W. D. WALKER 
C. X. MARLAND 
J. C. ANGUS 

Trustees 



71 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



The work of the Board of Health for the year 1918 has not 
differed materially from the routine work during the past five 
years, with the exception of the additional duties of co-operative 
effort during the influenza epidemic. 

Many public nuisances have been permanently abated. The 
Board in several instances has been obliged to take individual 
cases into court, where property owners either would not, or 
could not crary out the injunctions of the Board. In the abolish- 
ment of dwellings unfit for human habitation the Board has 
endeavored to promote physical well-being as distinguished 
from conditions which merely secure escape from disease. If 
our town is to secure that immunity from disease for which it 
should strive, there are at lease five great routes for the dis- 
semination of disease germs in which it is concerned, viz: water, 
food, milk, flies, and contact. The matter of sewage disposal, 
so far as it is a sanitary consideration, is being well taken care of 
by the Board of Public Works. In the Frye Village district 
several problems in sewage disposal have been brought to the 
attention of your Board, and the problem as a whole should be 
given immediate attention. 

The inspection of milk is each year becoming of increased 
importance, and your Board particularly desires, the coming 
year, to add a new Babcock milk tester to its equipment. 

We present here a table of the contagious diseases occurring 
in 1918: 

Chicken Pox 10 

Diphtheria 7 

Ophthalmia 1 

German Measles 197 

Measles 112 

Mumps 23 

Tuberculosis 6 

72 



Scarlet Fever 8 

Typhoid Fever 3 

Whooping Cough 13 

Cerebro Spinal Meningitis 3 

Dysentery 1 

Lobar Pneumonia 14 

Influenza 1503 



1901 



DEATHS 

Tuberculosis 8 

Lobar Pneumonia 6 

Influenza 25 



39 
It will be noticed that our town has been fortunate in at least two^ 
respects during the year. We have escaped an epidemic of con- 
tagious diseases that are as a rule, considered especially danger- 
ous to life; and compared with the death-rate throughout the 
state from influenza, our percentage has been remarkably low. 
In the first instance we feel that much credit is due our physicians, 
for an early diagnosis of the disease, and for prompt isolation. 
In the second instance we can but feel that the immediate closing 
of schools, churches and the public library had a marked influence 
in calling the attention of our townspeople to the danger of making 
light of what proved to be a dangerous disease. 

The late George W. Garland M. D., a pioneer, as well as a 
leader in the practice of medicine in Lawrence, Mass., once read 
a paper before a section of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 
entitled, "There remains much yet to be learned". Dr. Garland 
combined with his rare skill as a physician, the attributes that 
made him during his professional life the typical family physician, 
a type which in the larger municipalities and towns at least, is 
rapidly becoming a matter of history. This fact is not due to a 
lack of medical men of repute, ability and conscientious atten- 
tion to the duties of the profession, but rather to the onward ten- 
dency towards specialism. The matter of public sanitation and 

73 



its administration was left at this period largely in the hands of 
men who had to do mainly with the administration of public 
affairs in general, with the help of such laws as were at the time 
on the public statutes. During the past twenty-five years, much 
has been learned, and much has been done, to aid in the care of 
individual and public health. It is to be hoped that the factor of 
specialism may not enter too largely into the work of the State's 
health administration. That which in surgery is termed the 
"end results" should be made a potent topic for consideration, 
as well as bacteriological findings, and the compilation of statis- 
tics and percentages. With this in view we trust that the coming 
year may see the State Department of Health empowered with 
funds to make special study of the question of Social Service work 
as an aid to local Boards of Health. This matter has been par- 
ticularly brought to the attention of your Board during the 
•epidemic of influenza which carried with it, not only individual 
loss of life, but social and economic conditions in public life, 
such as rarely visit communities. It was found that the diagnosis 
and treatment of the disease was but a part of the physician's 
work. It devolved upon him in many cases to take over a con- 
siderable responsibility in the care and adjustment of family 
affairs, and it is to the credit of the physicians throughout our 
state and country that they were not lacking in the atributes 
which make for the true family physician. Your Board of 
Health finds it difficult in mere words to express its gratitude, or 
voice the sentiments of our townspeople, in regard to the noble 
work done by organized effort, and individual care, in the ad- 
ministration of relief to the distressed and suffering families in our 
town. Not only has there been most hearty co-operation by 
members of the different organized bodies of men and women, but 
a spirit of chivalry has been shown second only to that which 
dominated our citizens in their attitude during the struggle which 
menaced the peace, not only of our country, but of the world. It 
would not be difficult, and yet the list would be long, to cite names 
of men and women who have sacrificed time, money, and even 
health, in this work. It is also to their credit that the spirit of 
neighborliness, which unfortunately has had a tendency to be 
classed with the lost arts, has again been brought to the surface. 

74 



We cannot too strongly commend to our citizens the advice 
so often brought to their notice by the State Department of 
Health and its agents. It is a well-known fact that free advice 
is not as a rule, well taken. Remember then, that all this good 
advice though given freely, is not entirely free, you are paying- 
for it through the usual channel of taxation ; consider it as you 
would a part of your life insurance. 

The percentage of deaths in the total population of a com- 
munity may be used as a guide to the healthfulness of that 
community, but there are many other considerations to be 
thought of. Public sanitation and infant mortality are two sub- 
jects which are from year to year being given more attention. 
The percentage of deaths from all diseases, and from contagious 
diseases, is an interesting and valuable study, but the percentage 
of death itself is always 100%. This is the "end result" which 
the conscientious physician, the Board of Health, and the pains- 
taking State Department of Health are striving to guard against. 
To this end, it is not entirely a matter of bacteriological findings, 
statistics, care and treatment of the patient, but also the study 
and care of social and economic conditions. Your Board would 
therefore, ask you to study with care and deliberation, the various 
bills in regard to matters concerning public health which are 
from time to time brought up for consideration by the legisla- 
ture of our state. The public as a whole, suppose that somebody 
is looking after these matters. They should realize that the 
entire responsibility does not rest on any one person or depart- 
ment. The conservation of health, like the conservation of food 
or money, should be made a matter of personal study. 

Your Board would commend, and ask you to support in every 
way the employment of a school nurse. It is a physical impossi- 
bility for a school physician, however much his interest may 
center in the public schools, to give the time and attention to 
this department which the subject merits. The school nurse is 
his aid. 

The work of the district nurse has become too wellknown, and 
is without question, of such inestimable value, that from what- 
ever source her financial support may be obtained, the work 
should be carried on and encouraged. 

75 



As we have already said, it would be an impossibility to record 
the beneficent work which has been done during the past year by- 
organized charity, private administration, and Social Service 
workers. 

The work of the Andover Public Safety Committee in its 
various departments, has at all time received the encouraging 
support of our townspeople. An attempt was made to so en- 
large its Health Committee that the several existing organiza- 
tions in town, all with fundamentally the same object in view, 
should be represented, and thus so far as possible, prevent 
friction and the overlapping of work. The chairman of the 
committee would take this opportunity to publicly express his 
sincere appreciation of all the work so faithfully and unselfishly 
carried out by the members of that committee in conjunction 
with the work of the Red Cross and Public Health Association. 
The results of this work were seen in the manifest relief of much 
physical suffering, and was in many instances a source of financial 
aid to families in distress during the influenza epidemic. Much 
has been learned and "There remains much yet to be learned ". 

In asking an appropriation of $2000 for the current year, we 
have in mind $1300 for ordinary expenses, and $700 for the 
support of cases of tuberculosis and contagious diseases that have 
in years past been under the jurisdiction of the Overseers of the 
Poor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANKLIN H. STACEY, Chairman 

BANCROFT T. HAYNES 

CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M. D., Secretary 

Board of Health 



76 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Richardson schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 



Amount carried forward 



Town House, fixtures and furniture 


850000.00 




Engine house, storehouse and barn 


25000.00 




25723 feet land 


20000.00 


vS95000.00 






Memorial Hall 


30000.00 




22318 feet land 


10000.00 


40000.00 


Engine house, Ballardvale 


6000.00 


New shed 


200.00 




1-3 acre land 


250.00 




, 




6450.00 


Almshouse 


16000.00 


Barn and other buildings 


3800.00 




31 1-2 acres land 


5000.00 


24800.00 


Pun chard High School 


94000.00 


4 acres land 


8000.00 


102000.00 


Heating plant, Jackson schoolhouse 


30000.00 




John Dove schoolhouse 


25000.00 




Stowe schoolhouse 


31000.00 




3 3-4 acres land 


6000.00 


92000.00 


Brad lee schoolhouse, Ballardvale 


23000.00 


1 acre land 


500.00 


23500.00 



7000.00 
400.00 



7400.00 



$391150.00 



77 



Amount brought forward 



$391150.00 



Indian Ridge schoolhouse 
1 acre land 

West Center schoolhouse 
1-2 acres land 

North District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Bailey District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Osgood District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale 
1-4 acre land 

9 acres, Indian Ridge (Gravel Pit) 

41 1-2 acres, Carmel Woods Reservation 

173,751 sq. ft. land, Central Park 

(Richardson Field) 
6 1-2 acres Playstead 
Bandstand 

Andover Board Public Works — 
Pipe-lines and fountains 
Pumping-station and buildings 
Coal shed 

3 acres land 

20 acres Boston Ice Co. land 
2 reservoirs 

4 1-2 acres land 
Machinery and tools 
Stone-breaker and engine 

Amount carried forward 



SI 7000. 00 
800.00 



3500. 


00 


150. 


00 


3500. 


00 


50. 


00 


2500. 


00 


50. 


00 


2000 


.00 


50 


.00 


3000 


.00 


500 


.00 



248000.00 

42500.00 

700.00 

800.00 

2500.00 

16000.00 

2350.00 

1000.00 

2000.00 



17800.00 



3650.00 



3550.00 



2550.00 



2050.00 



3500.00 

3000.00 

3600.00 

15000.00 

5000.00 
1000.00 



S3 15850. 00 451850.00 



78 



Amount brought forward 



S315850.00 451850.00 



Steam road roller 


1000.00 




Pump-house, east side No. Main St. 


5000.00 




3 sleds 


75.00 




1 auto 


300.00 




3 horses 


800.00 




Carts and harnesses 


200.00 




Sewer System 


253000.00 




Workshop, Lewis Street 


1600.00 




Barn and shed, Lewis Street 


3000.00 




47467 ft. land, Lewis Street 


3000.00 






— 583825. 


00 

• 




1035675 


.00 


mchard School Fund 


76454 


.28 


emorial Hall, Permanent Fund 


S45000.00 





Memorial Hall Library, John Cornell 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Byers 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Edward Taylor 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Isaac E. Gid- 
dings Fund 

Memorial Hall Library and furniture 

Memorial Hall Library, Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union 

Memorial Hall Library, Phillips Fund 

Personal Property at Town Farm 
Motor Combination Chemical Truck 
Motor Combination Pump and Truck 
One Steam Fire Engine and apparatus 
Hook and Ladder Truck 
Two hose wagons 

Amount carried forward 



7700.00 



10000.00 



500.00 



3000. 


00 




10000. 


00 




100 


.00 




3200 


.00 


79500.00 
3800.00 










5300.00 






9000.00 






2800.00 






1000.00 




SI 


1000.00 




214529.28 



79 



Amount brought forward 

Hose sled 

Four horses 

Hay scales 

Safes in Town House 

41 1-2 acres of land, Spring Grove Cem'y 

Receiving-tomb and toot-house 

Weights and measures 
Fire Alarm apparatus 
4000 ft. hose 



SI 


1214529.28 




60.00 




1000.00 




350.00 




800.00 


S7500.00 




1500.00 






9000.00 
350.00 






4500.00 




2000.00 


SI 232589. 28 



80 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of Assessors: 

The following is the Report of the Collector of Taxes for the 
year ending December 31, 1918. 



1915 



Amount as per warrant 
Added to warrant 
Moth work 
Street sprinkling 
Interest 
Collected taxes 
Collected moth work 
Collected street sprinkling 
Collected interest 
Abated 



1916 



Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Street sprinkling 

Moth work 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected street sprinkling 

Collected moth work 

Collected interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 





$3213.12 




36.60 




49.90 




13.08 




461.90 


$2854.25 




49.90 




13.08 




461.90 




395.47 





S3774.60 $3774.60 





$10303.15 




5.78 




66.21 




101.90 




756.26 


$7051.88 




66.21 




101.90 




756.26 




579.82 




2677.23 





$11233.30 S11233.30 



81 



1917 



Amount as per warrant 








$29179.98 


Added to warrant 








10.47 


Moth work 








199.25 


Street sprinkling 








271.23 


Interest 








793.42 


Collected taxes 






$19014.67 




Collected moth work 






199.25 




Collected street sprinkling 






271.23 




Collected interest 






793.42 




Abated 






356.04 




Uncollected 






9817.74 




Add for error in warrant 






2.00 






$30454.35 $30454.35 






1918 






Amount as per warrant 






$182451.10 


Added to warrant 




• 




65.27 


Moth work 








2363.55 


Street sprinkling 








846.55 


Interest 








73.95 


Collected taxes 






$148464.04 




Collected moth work 






2363.55 




Collected street sprinkling 






846.55 




Collected interest 






73.95 




Abated 






209.79 




Uncollected 






33842.54 






$185800.42 $1 
iSH ACCOUNT, 1 


185800.42 


SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CI 


918 


AMOUNT COLLECTED 


AND PAID TO TOWN TREASURER 










Moth 


Street 








Taxes 




Work 


Sprinkling 


Interest 


Total 


1915 .... 


$ 2854. 


25 


$ 49.90 


13.08 


$ 461.90 


$ 3379.13 


1916 .... 


7051. 


88 


101.90 


66.21 


756.26 


7976.25 


1917 .... 


19014. 


67 


199 . 25 


271.23 


793.42 


20278.57 


1918 .... 


148464 . 


04 


2363.55 


846.55 


73.95 


151748.09 




$177384.84 


$2714.60 


$1197.07 


$2085.53 


$183382.04 








GEORGE 111' 


jGINS 








82 




Collech 


?r, protem 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Liabilities 

Water Bonds, 4% (10000 due 1919) 
Water Bonds, 3J^% (3000 due 1919) 
Sewer Bonds, 4% (15000 due 1919) 
And'r Loan Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1919) 
High School Loan, \% (6000 due 1919) 



S102000.00 

44000.00 

100000.00 

10000.00 

99000.00 



-S355000.00 



Asset.* 

Cash, General Fund 
Cash, Water Loan 
Cash, Sewer Loan 
Cash, Sewer Assessments 

Uncollected taxes 
Street sprinkling 
Moth work 

Commonwealth, State Aid 
Commonwealth, pauper account 
Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 
Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 
Sewer Assessments 
Unpaid Water Rates of January 1 
Sinking Funds 

Balance against Town 



S14251.67 

5026.59 

356.59 

3980.72 



46337. 


51 


199 


.37 


413 


.05 



23615.57 



1949.00 


46949 . 


93 


232.83 






510.66 






540.67 






5590.90 






6028 . 03 






63889.29 








78741 
205693 


.38 
.12 




$355000 


.00 






GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 



Balance Jan. 1, 1918, General Fund 

Balance Jan. 1, 1918, High School Loan 

Balance Jan. 1, 1918, Water Loan 

Balance Jan. 1, 1918, Sewer Loan 

Balance Jan. 1, 1918, Abbott Village Sewer Ass'm't 

Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 

Bank Tax 

Income Tax 

Reimbursement taxes on land 

Soldiers' Exemption 

State Aid 

School Tuition 

Industrial School 

Mothers' Aid 

Hospitals for Comsumptives 

Contagious Diseases 

Pauper Account 

Temporary Aid 

Highway Com., Lowell St. 

Highway Com., Moth Work 

Hawkers' Licenses 



Commonwealth 
Commonweal th 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Com mo n wea 1 1 h 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonweal th 
Commonweal th 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 
Commonwealth 



Commonwealth 
Essex County, Lowell Street 
Essex County, Dog Tax 
Essex County, killing dogs 
Andover National Bank, Notes 
Collector's Department, Taxes 
Collector's Department, Interest on Taxes 
Collector's Department, Street Sprinkling 
Collector's Department, Moth Work 
Collector's Department, Interest on Deposits 
Board of Public Works, Water Rates 
Board of Public Works, Service Pipe 

Amount carried forward 



S5648 


10 


1742 


28 


5026. 


59 


356. 


59 


5776. 


13 


23310. 


64 


7770.04 


27580 


17 


70 


08 


104 


08 


1230 


00 


244 


50 


89 


96 


552 


50 


114 


29 


123 


50 


27 


86 


94 


29 


5000 


00 


24 


00 


65 


00 


5000 


00 


621 


13 


44 


00 


100000 


00 


177384 


84 


2085 


53 


1197 


07 


2714. 


60 


133 


28 


27053 


04 


2448 


96 


$403633.05 



84 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 



Orders paid 
Schools 

New High School 
Highway Department 
Lowell Street 
Park Department 
Street Lighting 
Police 

Fire Department 
Brush Fires 

Printing and Stationery 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous 
Town House 
Town Officers 
Spring Grove Cemetery 
Board of Health 
Moth Work 
Tree Warden 
Public Dump 
Hay Scales 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 
Memorial Day 

Special G. A. R. Appropriation 
Memorial Hall Library 
Memorial Hall Library, Dog Tax 
Old Schoolhouse, Ballard vale 
Almshouse Expenses 
Almshouse Repairs 
Relief out of Almshouse 
Soldiers' Relief 
State Aid * 

Amount carried forward 

85 



S S60789. 


52 


1827. 


21 


26804. 


00 


14999. 


46 


1496. 


65 


6262. 


39 


4873. 


50 


11407 


58 


687 


.85 


1379 


.50 


4167. 


89 


1185. 


74 


3157. 


36 


6738 


.15 


4363 


99 


1387. 


85 


5522 


.89 


427 


.70 


75 


.00 


103 


.73 


18372 


.06 


350 


.00 


100 


.00 


1800 


.00 


621 


.13 


250 


.00 


5411 


.94 


148 


.11 


3766 


.56 


1025 


.77 


1949 


.00 


$191452 


,53 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 

Dr. 

Amount brought forward $403633 . 05 

Board of Public Works, Highway Department 1133.97 

Board of Public Works, Sidewalk Assessments 672.49 

W. C. Crowley, Sealer's Fees 47.83 

George A. Higgins, Town Clerk, Fees 128.00 

Board of Health, Slaughter Licenses 3.00 

Board of Health, Garbage Licenses 2.00 

F. H. Stacey, Milk Licenses 9.50 

J. H. Playdon, Moth Supplies 65.00 

Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale, rents 187.50 

Colver J. Stone, Trial Justice, Fines 84.00 

Almshouse 1355.43 

Spring Grove Cemetery, Sale and Care of Lois 1969.03 

Town House, Rents 182.75 

School Dept., Tuition and Supplies 461.29 

Hay Scales 81.35 

Tree Warden, Sale of Lumber 36.96 

Cities and Towns, Pauper Account 57.85 

Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 126.67 

Cities and Towns, Board of Health 16.30 

Fire Department, Use of Horses 1437.70 

Fire Department, Rent of Shed 50.00 

Sewer Department, Assessments 4052 . 73 

Sewer Department, Interest on Assessments 309.56 

Andover National Bank, Interest on Deposits 775.41 

And over Nat'l Bank, Interest on High School Loan 59.93 

High School Loan, Sale of Radiators 25 .00 

High School Loan, Balance to Treasury S.33 

Brush Fire Department 123.90 

Insurance Dividends 39.64 

Phillips Academy, Street Lighting 230.00 



Total Receipts $417366 . 17 



86 



account with